Computing Books published by McGraw Hill

The following is a list of Computing Books published by McGraw Hill in the Centre for Computing History collection. It is not an exhaustive list of and other books may have been published. If you have a book that you would like to donate to our collection, please view our donations page.

There are 22 Computing Books published by McGraw Hill in our collection :
Order By : Title - Release Date - Publisher
6502 Assembly Language Programming Date: 1986 6502 Assembly Language Programming

6502 Assembly Language Programming

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Lance A. Leventhal
Platform: 6502

6502 Assembly Language Subroutines Date: 1982 6502 Assembly Language Subroutines

6502 Assembly Language Subroutines
by Lance A. Leventhal, Winthrop Saville
Binding: Paperback
Description:x, 550 p. ; 24 cm.
Publisher: Osborne/McGraw-Hill, U. S
Date Published: 1982
ISBN-13: 9780931988592 ISBN: 0931988594

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Lance A. Leventhal, Winthrop Saville
Platform: 6502

BBC Micro and Electron Book Date: 1985 BBC Micro and Electron Book

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Gavin Haines
Platform: BBC Micro

Complete Reference Internet 2nd Edition Date: 2002 Complete Reference Internet 2nd Edition

General reference book on the internet

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Margaret Levine Young
Platform: None

Computer System Performance Date: July 1995 Computer System Performance

Computer System Performance
Author: Herbert Hellerman, Thomas F. Conroy
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Inc.,US
380 pages
ISBN-13: 9780070279537
ISBN: 0070279535
Publication date: 07/1975
Hardcover

Publisher: McGraw Hill

Platform: Performance

How to Do Everything with Your Palm Handheld Date: 2003 How to Do Everything with Your Palm Handheld

by Dave Johnson, Rick Broida
Trade paperback, McGraw-Hill/Osborne Media 2003
4th edition
442 pages
ISBN: 0072230827
ISBN-13: 9780072230826

Put down that flimsy manual and get to the heart of the matter with the fourth edition of this step-by-step Palm goldmine. Easy-to-follow and filled with information, this handy guide will help readers achieve the most from their Palm Handheld.

This guide provides expanded coverage of the palm as a portable office to address the needs of a growing number of palm users who work on documents, update databases, and manage their finances and schedules from their handheld device while on the go.

Publisher: McGraw Hill

Platform: Palm

Information Handling for the ZX Spectrum Date: 1983 Information Handling for the ZX Spectrum

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: C A STreet
Platform:

Interfacing the BBC Microcomputer Date: 1984 Interfacing the BBC Microcomputer

 

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Colin Opie
Platform: BBC Micro

Internetworking with TCP/IP Vol. I: Principles, Protocols, and Architecture Date: 1991 Internetworking with TCP/IP Vol. I: Principles, Protocols, and Architecture

Second Edition
by Douglas E. ComerPublishers: Prentice Hall 1991
Paperback 548 pages
ISBN-10: 0134743210
ISBN-13: 9780134743219

Publisher: McGraw Hill

Platform: TCIP

Learn and Use Assembly Language on the ZX Spectrum Date: 1983 Learn and Use Assembly Language on the ZX Spectrum

by Tony Woods
Publisher McGraw-Hill
ISBN-10    070847053
Published 1983
Edition    First Edition
Binding    Soft Cover 160 pages

Machine code for action. Machine-code programs run very quickly, literally hundreds of times faster than the equivalent BASIC. And they are very powerful, enabling your computer to do things undreamed of by its manufacturer!
The ZX Spectrum uses a Z80 processor, and machine-code programs are written in Z80 assembly language. This book is a complete course in Z80 assembly language, right from the beginning. Written by an experienced teacher and programmer, it is ideal for anyone with a knowledge of BASIC and contains many complete-and useful- programs.
Assembly software. The assembly-language listings in this book can of course be hand assembled into machine code, but for speed and accuracy you should use the McGraw-Hill ZX Spectrum Machine Code Assembler program, available on cassette for the 16K or 48K Spectrum. All the program listings have been specially written to match this software

Publisher: McGraw Hill

Platform: ZX Spectrum

LEO: The Incredible Story of the World's First Business Computer Date: 1998 LEO: The Incredible Story of the World's First Business Computer

The revised United States edition of User-Driven Innovation. A Chinese edition was published in 2000.

To see a pdf of the Preface to this book, click on the following link : Click here
#OBJECT=50353=https://www.researchgate.net/publication/220373807_LEO_The_Incredible_Story_of_the_World's_First_Business_Computer#

#OBJECT=50681#

Extracts from Reviews:

Professor Dick Nolan of the Harvard University Business School writes in his introduction to the book: "This story has the best qualities of a Harvard Business School case study: it is an important event in the history of the business. It is a study about extraordinary people ... As confident executives they look outside their company, in other countries, at universities to discover new ways of doing things and fresh ideas. In their bold actions, trust shows through as a foundation in implementing their vision. Young people are given free reign and do not disappoint. A resulting exciting, challenging ‘can-do' culture is heard in the words of the people who were there."

Dr Terry Gourvish, Director Business History Unit, LSE, in LSE Business History Newssheet: "This is a major contribution to the history of computing and computers in the UK. A full scale case study of LEO computers, written by members of the team who experienced all its trials and tribulations, it provides a fascinating insight into the development by J. Lyons & Co. of the first business computer in the UK."

Neil Fitzgerald, editor of CA magazine, in The Scotsman, Business section:
"Can-do culture, empowerment, user-driven innovation, business process re-engineering, flat organisations, quality, short lines of communications and decision making. We are led to believe that these are radical, modern ideas. However, a book that has come into my hands shows that they were being successfully harnessed almost half a century ago, to create the most significant event ever in business management. 

The editors ... tell the story of how they and others built and put to work the world's first business computer. This did not happen in California's Silicon Valley, but at Cadby Hall, the ... west London premises of Lyons.

An important facet was that they felt they should always take a strategic view of the whole function to be computerised and make recommendations for improvements before going to work."

Dr John Pinkerton, review in ICL Technical Journal: "Telling the story of how the foundations of data processing were laid from 1949 onwards has evidently been a labour of love. This is a work of scholarship but eminently readable nevertheless. It will be seen as a major contribution to the history of business computing; it is strongly recommended for anyone already working in or studying to enter the field of IT."

Michael Braithwaite, Deloitte, Touche, European Journal of Information Systems: "I commend this book to a wide audience. To the general reader it stands as a very well written and exciting account of technological innovation. To the business school student it presents a remarkable story of technological success that, as a commercial venture was flawed, perhaps by factors beyond the control of the players."

Professor George Mitchell, review published Journal of Operational Research Society: "This fascinating book tells the life story of LEO. Rather over a third of the book is the historical record, carefully researched and engagingly written up by Caminer. The rest is largely personal memoirs of those involved in the early days, including accounts of several innovative applications. The whole is rounded off by an evaluation by Aris. The book's value is enhanced by the style of writing. Those who worked in LEO, especially in its earlier days, including many of the book's authors, exercised an influence on the development of business computing in the UK quite disproportionate to their numbers.

I found this book a good read and one which exited several strands of thought. Although its main market will be among scholars and students of IT and business studies, it deserves a wide readership in the OR community."

John Perkins, National Computer Centre Newsletter: "The book is a fascinating adventure story in which the dynamics of an extraordinary group of people
made the seemingly impossible happen."

Professor John Ward in the Journal of Strategic Information Systems: "The story of that first business computer: Leo - Lyons Electronic Office - is told in this book. Whilst it is history, reflection on what was achieved and not achieved and why still has many lessons of relevance to the successful use of IT today - we seem to be learning painfully and slowly!.

.... a review by John Aris of what of what he calls the ‘LEO approach' - an integrated combination of technology innovation, application and consultancy designed to enable significant business improvements from computer use in a range of situation. Many of these applications would be called ‘business process redesign' in the 1990s!

The wide range of contributors provide many different perspectives on what happened and views on why things evolved the way they did. It is a set of memoirs - often very personal ones - of a time when Britain could be said to have led the world in the application of this new technology.

... it is a book that we should all be grateful the authors took the time and trouble to get together and write. It is a story of extraordinary achievements, by a talented team..."

I. A. Lovelock in Management Accounting: "This book is a first-hand account of how this astounding innovation came about. It is a flesh and blood, warts and all story related by the participants, brimming over with the same enthusiasm that enabled the unlikeliest of organisations to lead the way into the future that we are all familiar with today.

It concludes with different strands coming together to provide the essence of the LEO credo of comprehensive, integrated, secure, action stimulated implementations.”

Professor T. Brady, Brighton University: "As well as being a fascinating piece of historical writing the book provides food for thought in the supposedly computer literate world of the 21st Century. Spectacular computer disasters such as the London Stock Exchange's Taurus system have left us with rather jaundiced perceptions about computer projects. Why were Lyons better at implementing computer systems?

One major factor was that before automating business processes the Lyons team ensured that they were well understood and ready for computerisation. Long before the prospect of computers came along, Lyons had established a systems research office with the brief to constantly search out how improvements might be made to the business by changing processes.

Professor Paul Ceruzzi, Smithsonian Institute Washington: "Most surveys of the history of computing mark the beginning of the commercial computer age with the delivery of the first UNIVAC in 1951. The better ones note the first delivery of a UNIVAC to a commercial, not government, customer (General Electric) in 1954. Only the best histories mention LEO, a computer built by the British catering company J. Lyons & Co. and first operational in September 1951, as the real beginning of commercial application of the stored program
computer.”

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: David Caminer
Platform:

Matrices and computers in electronic circuit analysis Date: 1971 Matrices and computers in electronic circuit analysis


Matrices and computers in electronic circuit analysis / by Robert Lee Ramey and Edward John White
by Ramey, Robert Lee
New York : McGraw-Hill, [1971]
Electronic circuit design -- Data processing
390 p. : illus ; 23 cm.
Includes bibliographical references

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Robert Lee Ramey and Edward John White
Platform:

Metropolitan Area Networks Date: 1991 Metropolitan Area Networks

Concepts,standards, and services
by Gary C. Kessler and David A. Train..
Published 1991 by McGraw-Hill in New York, NY .
Hardback 436 pages
Written in English.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Classifications
Dewey Decimal Class 004.6/7
Library of Congress TK5105.85
ID Numbers
Open Library OL20947092M
ISBN 10 0070342431

Publisher: McGraw Hill

Platform: netwoorks

Process Quality Control Date: 1975 Process Quality Control

by Ellis R. Ott
Hardcover: 379 pages
Publisher: McGraw Hill Higher Education 1975
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0070479232
ISBN-13: 978-0070479234
Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6 x 0.8 inches

Review from Amazon:
"Full of numerous case studies that give insight into the kind of detailed process sleuthing that process capability studies are all about ... it should be a part of every serious quality practitioner's library."

--Bert Gunter in Quality Progress Magazine* Want to design fail-safe methods for finding and solving problems in complex processes? Discover new ways to coax answers from complicated data? Uncover hidden value in perplexing findings? If you want the most sophisticated and insightful approach to process sleuthing and process capability available, you've come to the right place. Packed with case studies drawn from real industrial processes, Process Quality Control demonstrates how to collect, crunch, and analyze data, step by step. Along the way, it gives you examples of successful, real-world applications used to solve tough questions. This book can help you: Learn time-tested troubleshooting methodologies. Discover better ways to gather, interpret and analyze data. Correctly interpret findings with time-ordered data. Resolve difficult, puzzling, or conflicting results with proven methods. Gain new insight in the analysis of attributes and variables data. Employ newer methods of analysis to maximize the information from your data. Draw problem-solving solutions from the identification of outliers in data. Apply graphical analysis to experimental designs. For anyone charged with discovering problems in processes, or suggesting improvements, there could be no more worthwhile--or inspiring--reading than Ellis Ott's, Edward G. Schilling's, and Dean V. Neubauer's Process Quality Control.

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Ellis R. Ott
Platform: quality control

Programming and Customizing the Basic Stamp Computer Date: 1998 Programming and Customizing the Basic Stamp Computer

Book with CD

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Scott Edwards
Platform: Miscellaneous

Q. L. Assembly Language Programming Date: 1st October Q. L. Assembly Language Programming

by Colin Opie
Paperback: 270 pages
Publisher: McGraw Hill Higher Education (1 Oct 1984)
Language English
ISBN-10: 0070847770
ISBN-13: 978-0070847774

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Opie
Platform: QL

Schaum's outline of theory and problems of mechanical vibrations Date: 1964 Schaum's outline of theory and problems of mechanical vibrations

by William W Seto
Published by : McGraw Hill, (New York :)
Physical details: 199 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
ISBN: 070563276.
Year: 1964

Publisher: McGraw Hill

Platform: Schaum

Spectrum Interfacing and Projects Date: 1983 Spectrum Interfacing and Projects

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Graham Bishop
Platform: ZX Spectrum

Systematics : A New Approach to Systems Analysis. Date: 1975 Systematics : A New Approach to Systems Analysis.

Based on his experience working with LEO Computers, Grindley sets out a ‘language’ for defining information systems.

Published: 1975
ISBN13: 9780894330209

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Kit Grindley
Platform: Tex

Systems Programming Date: 1st June Systems Programming

Systems Programming
John Donovan

ISBN: 9780070851757
Format: Paperback
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education - Europe
Edition: International edition

ISBN 0070851751   DEWEY 005.42
ISBN13 9780070851757
Publisher McGraw-Hill Education - Europe   Pages 500
Imprint McGraw-Hill Inc.,US   Published in New York
Format Paperback   Height (mm) 230
Publication date 01 Jun 1975

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: John J Donovan
Platform: programming

User-Driven Innovation: The Worlds First Business Computer Date: 1994 User-Driven Innovation: The Worlds First Business Computer

This is a first-hand account written by thirteen of the early users who developed the disciplines of systems engineering and put LEO to work on economic, time-dependent business applications, starting in 1951.

Included is an edited version of the seminal report of the two Lyons executives who, after a tour of the early computer activity in the United States in 1947, recommended that Lyons acquire a computer of their own. Also included is a Science Museum interview with John Simmons.

Tony Priest worked on the LEO for many years and kindly donated this book. It has been signed inside the front cover by John Aris, Frank Land and Ninian Eadie.

Extracts from Reviews

Professor Dick Nolan of the Harvard University Business School writes in his introduction to the book:

"This story has the best qualities of a Harvard Business School case study: it is an important event in the history of the business.

It is a study about extraordinary people ... As confident executives they look outside their company, in other countries, at universities to discover new ways of doing things and fresh ideas. In their bold actions, trust shows through as a foundation in implementing their vision. Young people are given free reign and do not disappoint. A resulting exciting, challenging ‘can-do' culture is heard in the words of the people who were there."

Dr Terry Gourvish, Director Business History Unit, LSE, inLSE Business History Newssheet,

"This is a major contribution to the history of computing and computers in the UK. A full scale case study of LEO computers, written by members of the team who experienced all its trials and tribulations, it provides a fascinating insight into the development by J. Lyons & Co. of the first business computer in the UK."

Neil Fitzgerald, editor of CA magazine, in The Scotsman, Business section. .

"Can-do culture, empowerment, user-driven innovation, business process re-engineering, flat organisations, quality, short lines of communications and decision making. We are led to believe that these are radical, modern ideas. However, a book that has come into my hands shows that they were being successfully harnessed almost half a century ago, to create the most significant event ever in business management.

The editors ... tell the story of how they and others built and put to work the world's first business computer. This did not happen in California's Silicon Valley, but at Cadby Hall, the ... west London premises of Lyons.

An important facet was that they felt they should always take a strategic view of the whole function to be computerised and make recommendations for improvements before going to work."

Dr John Pinkerton, review in ICL Technical Journal

"Telling the story of how the foundations of data processing were laid from 1949 onwards has evidently been a labour of love.

This is a work of scholarship but eminently readable nevertheless. It will be seen as a major contribution to the history of business computing; it is strongly recommended for anyone already working in or studying to enter the field of IT."

Michael Braithwaite, Deloitte, Touche, European Journal of Information Systems.

"I commend this book to a wide audience. To the general reader it stands as a very well written and exciting account of technological innovation. To the business school student it presents a remarkable story of technological success that, as a commercial venture was flawed, perhaps by factors beyond the control of the players."

Professor George Mitchell, review published Journal of Operational Research Society..

"This fascinating book tells the life story of LEO. Rather over a third of the book is the historical record, carefully researched and engagingly written up by Caminer. The rest is largely personal memoirs of those involved in the early days, including accounts of several innovative applications. The whole is rounded off by an evaluation by Aris. The book's value is enhanced by the style of writing. Those who worked in LEO, especially in its earlier days, including many of the book's authors, exercised an influence on the development of business computing in the UK quite disproportionate to their numbers.

I found this book a good read and one which exited several strands of thought. Although its main market will be among scholars and students of IT and business studies, it deserves a wide readership in the OR community."

John Perkins,National Computer Centre Newsletter,

"The book is a fascinating adventure story in which the dynamics of an extraordinary group of people made the seemingly impossible happen."

Professor John Ward in theJournal of Strategic Information Systems.

"The story of that first business computer: Leo - Lyons Electronic Office - is told in this book. Whilst it is history, reflection on what was achieved and not achieved and why still has many lessons of relevance to the successful use of IT today - we seem to be learning painfully and slowly!.

.... a review by John Aris of what of what he calls the ‘LEO approach' - an integrated combination of technology innovation, application and consultancy designed to enable significant business improvements from computer use in a range of situation. Many of these applications would be called ‘business process redesign' in the 1990s!

The wide range of contributors provide many different perspectives on what happened and views on why things evolved the way they did. It is a set of memoirs - often very personal ones - of a time when Britain could be said to have led the world in the application of this new technology.

... it is a book that we should all be grateful the authors took the time and trouble to get together and write. It is a story of extraordinary achievements, by a talented team..."

I. A. Lovelock in Management Accounting.

"This book is a first-hand account of how this astounding innovation came about. It is a flesh and blood, warts and all story related by the participants, brimming over with the same enthusiasm that enabled the unlikeliest of organisations to lead the way into the future that we are all familiar with today.

It concludes with different strands coming together to provide the essence of the LEO credo of comprehensive, integrated, secure, action stimulated implementations.

Professor T. Brady, Brighton University

"As well as being a fascinating piece of historical writing the book provides food for thought in the supposedly computer literate world of the 21st Century. Spectacular computer disasters such as the London Stock Exchange's Taurus system have left us with rather jaundiced perceptions about computer projects. Why were Lyons better at implementing computer systems?

One major factor was that before automating business processes the Lyons team ensured that they were well understood and ready for computerisation. Long before the prospect of computers came along, Lyons had established a systems research office with the brief to constantly search out how improvements might be made to the business by changing processes.”

Professor Paul Ceruzzi, Smithsonian Institute, Washington

"Most surveys of the history of computing mark the beginning of the commercial computer age with the delivery of the first UNIVAC in 1951.  The better ones note the first delivery of a UNIVAC to a commercial, not government, customer (General Electric) in 1954.  Only the best histories mention LEO, a computer built by the British catering company J. Lyons & Co. and first operational in September 1951, as the real beginning of commercial application of the stored-program computer."


Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: David Caminer, John Aris, Peter Hermon, Frank Land
Platform:

World Wide Web Explorer Date: 1996 World Wide Web Explorer

"The book begins by telling you the best way to connect to the Net with Web access in mind, and how to chose suitable software and establish an Internet account that will cost you as little as possible while providing the greatest flexibility possible."

Publisher: McGraw Hill
Author: Steve Rimmer
Platform: None

Help support the museum by buying from the museum shop

View all items

Founding Sponsors
redgate Google ARM Real VNC Microsoft Research
Heritage Lottery Funded
Heritage Lottery Fund
Accredited Museum