Seymour Cray demonstrates CRAY-1 - The first vector-processor supercomputer

1976
Seymour Cray demonstrates CRAY-1 - The first vector-processor supercomputer

Seymour Cray demonstrates the first vector-processor supercomputer, the CRAY-1. The first customers include Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and NCAR.
 
The CRAY-1 hardware is more compact and faster than previous supercomputers. No wire is more than 4 feet long, and the clock period is 12.5 nanoseconds (billionths of a second).
 
The machine is cooled by freon circulated through stainless steel tubing bonded within vertical wedges of aluminum between the stacks of circuit boards (Cray patents the bonding process). The CRAY-1ís speed and power attract researchers, who want access to it over networks.


 

 

 

 

Seymour Cray demonstrates CRAY-1 - The first vector-processor supercomputer

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