Apple Mac Books

The following is a list of Apple Mac Books in the Centre for Computing History collection. It is not an exhaustive list of and other books may have been published. If you have a book that you would like to donate to our collection, please view our donations page.

There are 34 Apple Mac Books in our collection :
Order By : Title - Release Date - Publisher
Apple Technical Introduction to the Macintosh Family Date: 1987 Apple Technical Introduction to the Macintosh Family

Apple Technical Introduction to the Macintosh Family for the Apple Macintosh

With the introduction of the second generation of Apple® Macintosh® computers, the Macintosh SE and the Macintosh II, Apple has broadened the definition of the Macintosh system with two open machines. These machines add significant new capabilities to the Macintosh family, at the same time fitting well within the flexible Macintosh software architecture. This book describes that software architecture, as well as the hardware architectures of the various Macintosh machines.
About this book
Technical Introduction to the Macintosh Family introduces the hardware and software design of the Macintosh family of computers and serves as a starting point to the Macintosh technical documentation. The discussion is primarily oriented toward the Macintosh Plus, Macintosh SE, and Macintosh II computers, but it also touches on earlier versions of the Macintosh where these differ from the Macintosh Plus. The information in this book can provide a starting point for programmers, particularly those who are new to the Macintosh. This book can also serve as a stand-alone handbook for technically minded users and system administrators.
Note that this book will not tell you how to write a Macintosh application. That task is undertaken by a second short volume, Programmer's Introduction to the Macintosh Family. 

In describing the architecture of the Macintosh system, this book follows an "outside-in" plan, beginning with the parts of the system seen by the user and proceeding to the lower-level details of the Operating System and the hardware:
o Chapters 1 and 2 introduce the basic pieces of the system hardware and software.
o Chapter 3 describes the graphical, window-based interface that the Macintosh presents to the user, beginning with a discussion of how mouse and keyboard actions are interpreted.

o Chapter 4 expands upon the discussion of this interface by describing resources, specially formatted chunks of data that are used to store user interface elements such as menus, windows, and icons.
o Chapters 5 through 8 describe other elements of the Macintosh software-graphics, the Macintosh Finder and system software, the Macintosh's use of memory, and files.

o Chapter 9 finishes the discussion of the Macintosh software by describing the low-level stuff of the Macintosh Operating System: the managers and device drivers that talk directly to the computer's hardware.
o Chapter 10 describes the hardware itself, contrasting the Macintosh Plus, the Macintosh SE, and the Macintosh IL
o Chapter 11 concludes the book by outlining the A!UX® operating system, Apple's implementation of the AT&T UNIX® Operating System for the Macintosh IL
This book surveys only the surface of the Macintosh hardware and software. If this book were presented interactively, as a piece of Macintosh software, it would represent no more than the Macintosh desktop, where each item could be doubleclicked to reveal many deeper levels of information. You can find these deeper levels of information in the other volumes of the Inside Macintosh Library. 

 

Publisher: Addison-Wesley
Author: Apple

AppleScript The Missing Manual Date: 2005 AppleScript The Missing Manual

AppleScript The Missing Manual for the Apple Macintosh is a book written by Adam Goldstein and published by O'Reilly Media in 2005.

Mac users around the world use AppleScript to automate their daily computing routines. Famed for its similarity to English and its ease of integration with other programs, AppleScript is the perfect programming language for time-squeezed Mac fans. As beginners quickly realize, however, AppleScript has one major shortcoming: it comes without a manual. No more. You don't need a degree in computer science, a fancy system administrator title, or even a pocket protector and pair of nerdy glasses to learn the Mac's most popular scripting language; you just need the proper guide at your side. AppleScript: The Missing Manual is that guide.Brilliantly compiled by author Adam Goldstein, AppleScript: The Missing Manual is brimming with useful examples. You'll learn how to clean up your Desktop with a single click, for example, and how to automatically optimize pictures for a website. Along the way, you'll learn the overall grammar of AppleScript, so you can write your own customized scripts when you feel the need. Naturally, AppleScript: The Missing Manual isn't merely for the uninitiated scripter. While its hands-on approach certainly keeps novices from feeling intimidated, this comprehensive guide is also suited for system administrators, web and graphics professionals, musicians, scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and others who need to learn the ins and outs of AppleScript for their daily work.Thanks to AppleScript: The Missing Manual, the path from consumer to seasoned script has never been clearer. Now you, too, can automate your Macintosh in no time.

Publisher: OReilly, 2005
Author: Adam Goldstein

Applied Mac Scripting Date: 1995 Applied Mac Scripting

Applied Mac Scripting covers Applescript, Frontier and other automation tools.

This introduction to the AppleScript environment shows users how to link Apple Macintosh programs for efficient data sharing and smooth work flow. Shows how to design, test, debug, and implement integrated systems. Includes tips on network automation, database management, graphics, and word processing. CD includes demo software and useable Apple Scripts.

Develop and design scripts with AppleScript, Frontier, and a variety of other Macintosh applications. Applied Mac® Scripting shows you how. The book's valuable techniques and CD-ROM help readers master important automation tools such as QuicKeys, Tempo II, and nShell. Applied Mac Scripting also covers FaceSpan application builder, Scripting PlainTalk, and System 7.5.

Tom Trinko also wrote "AppleScript For Dummies"

 

 

Publisher: M&T Books
Author: Tom Trinko

Dvorak's Inside Track to the Mac Date: 1991 Dvorak's Inside Track to the Mac

Dvorak's Inside Track to the Mac for Apple Macintosh.

The fact is simple. The Macintosh is one great computer — no matter what IBM PC or Amiga users like to think. The world has taken to the idea of the Mac's graphical interface. Everyone agrees that it is the model for the future and will be used by everyone, whether in the form of the Mac operating system, or Windows, or whatever.

With this guide, you will learn about the Macintosh and how it works. You will read about different areas of Mac software and how they could be of value to you. There are chapters on spreadsheets, word processing, databases, telecommunications, file management, educational programs, and desktop publishing. There is a chapter on HyperCard, which walks you through the creation of your own HyperCard stack. 'This means you will learn the basics of program- ming. This book covers the Macintosh in a logical order. We begin with a brief discussion of all computers, then move to Mac commands 2md information on the operating system, INITs and CDEVs, and XV desk accessories. Wherever possible, we make recommendatioiis, called "Tips," "Notes," and "Cautions." From the basics we move to application-specific information. Each chapter is designed to give you an overview as well as an in-depth understanding. There is a discussion of the application and a sampling of the important software cmd hardware available.

SHAREWARE PROGRAMS There is more here than just a book. BMUG (Berkeley Macintosh Users Group) created a disk for us, and it's included free with this book. The disk is chockful — down to the last byte— of useful stuff. BMUG chose a sam- pling of shareware and freeware programs from what's available through users groups all around the country. The progreims are neatly filed into folders labeled "Utility," "Business," "Games," and "Telecommunica- tions." There is also a folder called "About BMUG," with more mformation on the users group.

Includes: A 3.5-lnch Disk of Outstanding Programs for Your Macintosh

CHAPTER 1 COMPUTER BASICS: THE CPU. HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE. MACINTOSH HARDWARE. COMPUTER MEM- ORY. THE OPERATING SYSTEM. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 2 THE MAC FAMILY: THE MACINTOSH METAPHOR. APPLE BEGINNINGS IN A NUTSHELL. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 3 YOUR MACINTOSH: NOW YOUVE GOT IT. WHERE WILL YOU PUT IT?, UNPACK YOUR MACINTOSH, SET UP YOUR MACINTOSH. ADD DEVICES, START YOUR COMPUTER, THE OPERATING SYSTEM. SYSTEM 7 INSTALLATION-TIPS AND TRAPS

CHAPTER 4 USING YOUR MACINTOSH: WELCOME TO MACINTOSH. THE FINDER DESKTOP. MENUS. THE FINDER MENU BAR, WORKING IN APPLICATIONS, COMMAND KEYS, CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 5 THE SYSTEM FOLDER: PRINTMONITOR, STARTUP ITEMS IN SYSTEM 7, APPLE MENU ITEMS IN SYSTEM 7, DESK ACCESSORIES, CHOOSER, EXTENSIONS, CONTROL PANELS. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 6 OPERATING SYSTEMS AND UTILITIES: THE OPERATING SYSTEM. UTILITIES. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 7 DISK AND FILE MANAGEMENT:    FILE STORAGE CONCEPTS, THE DESKTOP FILE, BACKUP FILES. FILE COMPRESSION. SECURITY, COMPUTER VIRUSES CONTENTS

CHAPTER 8 PRINTERS AND PRINTING:  PRINTERS, HOW TO PICK A PRINTER, SETTING UP A MACINTOSH PRINTER

CHAPTER 9 FONTS: A BRIEF HISTORY OF TYPE. FONTS VERSUS TYPEFACES. FONT TYPES. WHICH FONTS SHOULD YOU USE?, BITMAPPED AND TRUETYPE FONT INSTALLATION, INSTALUNG POSTSCRIPT FONTS. FONT CHARACTERISTICS AND SIZING. USING FONTS TO COM- MUNICATE EFFECTIVELY. CREATING AND MODIFYING FONTS. OTHER FONT UTIUTIES, A MORE TECHNICAL LOOK AT FONTS. LOOKING AHEAD. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 10 SCANNING AND OCR: SCANNER BASICS, OCR: HOW TO MAKE YOUR MACINTOSH READ, CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 11 THE NOISY MAC: THE SOUNDS OF THE MACINTOSH, WHERE DO YOU GET SOUNDS?, THE MACINTOSH SPEAKS, THE MACINTOSH LISTENS. THE MACINTOSH PLAYS MUSIC. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 12 TELECOMMUNICATIONS: WHEN TELECOMMUNICATIONS BEGAN, WHAT IS TELECOMMUNICATIONS?, TRANS- FERRING TEXT FILES TO AND FROM A MACINTOSH, MACINTOSH COMMUNICATIONS HARDWARE STANDARDS, STANDARD MODEM FEATURES, FILE TRANSFER PROTO- COLS, COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE. ELECTRONIC MAIL AND INFORMATION UTILI- TIES. MAC FAX

CHAPTER 13 HARDWARE AND PERIPHERALS: MEMORY UPGRADES, LOGICAL UPGRADES, STORAGE DEVICES, DISPLAY MONITORS. PRESENTATION DEVICES, HAND-INPUT DEVICES. PROTECTION AND SECURITY DEVICES. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 14 HYPERCARD: HYPERROOTS, HYPERCARD-TURN IT ON. CREATE A NEW STACK. NOW YOU KNOW HOW IT WORKS, HYPERCARD APPLICATIONS, CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 15 PERSONAL AND HOME COMPUTING: PERSONAL AND HOUSEHOLD FINANCIAL MANAGERS, INCOME TAX PROGRAMS. PERSONAL NETWORKS; ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES, OTHER PERSONAL ORGANIZATION AND TIME MANAGEMENT PRODUCTS, INTEGRATED PROGRAMS, CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 16 NUMBER CRUNCHING: ACCOUNTING BASICS. MATHEMATICAL AND STATISTICAL SOFTWARE. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 17 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS: FILE MANAGERS. RELATIONAL DATABASE MANAGERS. PERSONAL INFORMATION MANAGERS (PIMS)

CHAPTER 18 WORD PROCESSING: A FINE LINE, WORD-PROCESSING FEATURES, WORD-PROCESSING SOFTWARE. SUPPORTING APPLICATIONS

CHAPTER 19 DESKTOP PUBLISHING: WHY BUY A DEDICATED DESKTOP PUBLISHING PROGRAM?, PRINTING, DESKTOP PUBUSHING PROGRAMS, CLIPART, CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 20 GRAPHICS, PRESENTATION, AND MULTIMEDIA PROGRAMS 535 WYSIWYG-WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET, GRAPHICS. PRESENTATION APPLICATIONS. MULTIMEDIA. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 21 EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE: HISTORY OF COMPUTERS IN SCHOOLS, TYPES OF SOFTWARE, TYPICAL PACKAGES FOR PRESCHOOL, TYPICAL PACKAGES FOR ELEMENTARY GRADES, PROGRAMS FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, PROGRAMS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION. TEACHER PRODUCTIVITY, ADULT EDUCATION, THE FUTURE OF COMPUTERS IN SCHOOLS

CHAPTER 22 COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN: DIMENSIONS, CAD BASICS, BUILDING BLOCK LIBRARIES, DESIGN LAYERS, WHAT TO CAD AROUND WITH, OTHER CAD WARES CHAPTER 23 NETWORKING 591 NETWORKING THE MACINTOSH, CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 24 PROGRAMMING THE MACINTOSH: WHAT IS A PROGRAM?, LANGUAGES, PROGRAMMING PHILOSOPHIES: STRUCTURAL VS. OBJECT-ORIENTED, PROGRAMMABLE PROGRAMS, PROGRAMMER’S RE- SOURCES FROM APPLE

APPENDIX A MACINTOSH MODELS: OLD-TIMER MACINTOSHES, ACTIVE MACINTOSHES. MACINTOSH CLONES

APPENDIX B MAC ERROR MESSAGES

Publisher: Osborne McGraw-Hill
Author: John C. Dvorak

Excel - Business Solutions for the Macintosh Date: September 1985 Excel - Business Solutions for the Macintosh

Excel Business Solutions for the Macintosh for Apple Macintosh

Micro Computer Books

 

Publisher: Addison-Wesley
Author: Richard Loggins

Getting Started with the Apple Macintosh, Including System 7 Date: 1999 Getting Started with the Apple Macintosh, Including System 7

Getting Started with the Apple Macintosh, Including System 7
Series: Getting Started Right

The basics of getting the Mac up and running, and some slightly more advanced topics regarding Macintosh applications, organizing the hard disk, working with fonts and sounds, the telecommunications revolution, and working with System 7. 

Publisher: Microsoft Press, 1999
Author: Neil Salkind

iMac FYI - Get More From Your iMac Date: 2000 iMac FYI - Get More From Your iMac

iMac FYI - Get More From Your iMac for Apple Macintosh

Answers questions on set up, customization, attaching peripherals, using the Internet, networking, problem solving, and working with pre-installed software.

Publisher: Muska & Lipman Publishing, 2000
Author: Martin C. Brown

Inside Macintosh: Volume I Date: 1st January 1985 Inside Macintosh: Volume I

Inside Macintosh, Volume 1 Volume I for Apple Macintosh

Inside Macintosh series is the Apple developer documentation manuals  for the APIs (Application Program Interfaces) and machine architecture of the Macintosh computer.

Volumes 1 to 6. (I to VI)

Kindly donated by Neil Hubbard

 

Publisher: Addison-Wesley, 1985
Author: Apple

Inside Macintosh: Volume II Date: 1st January 1985 Inside Macintosh: Volume II

Inside Macintosh, Volume 2 Volume II for Apple Macintosh

Inside Macintosh series is the Apple developer documentation manuals  for the APIs (Application Program Interfaces) and machine architecture of the Macintosh computer.

Volumes 1 to 6. (I to VI)

Kindly donated by Neil Hubbard

 

Publisher: Addison-Wesley
Author: Apple

Inside Macintosh: Volume III Date: 1st January 1985 Inside Macintosh: Volume III

Inside Macintosh, Volume 3 Volume III for Apple Macintosh

Inside Macintosh series is the Apple developer documentation manuals  for the APIs (Application Program Interfaces) and machine architecture of the Macintosh computer.

Volumes 1 to 6. (I to VI)

Kindly donated by Neil Hubbard

 

Publisher: Addison-Wesley
Author: Apple

Inside Macintosh: Volume IV Date: 1st October 1986 Inside Macintosh: Volume IV

Inside Macintosh, Volume 4 Volume IV for Apple Macintosh

Inside Macintosh series is the Apple developer documentation manuals  for the APIs (Application Program Interfaces) and machine architecture of the Macintosh computer.

Volumes 1 to 6. (I to VI)

Kindly donated by Neil Hubbard

 

 

 

Publisher: Addison-Wesley, 1986
Author: Apple

Inside Macintosh: Volume V Date: 1st February 1988 Inside Macintosh: Volume V

Inside Macintosh, Volume 5 Volume V for Apple Macintosh

Inside Macintosh series is the Apple developer documentation manuals  for the APIs (Application Program Interfaces) and machine architecture of the Macintosh computer.

Volumes 1 to 6. (I to VI)

Kindly donated by Neil Hubbard

 

Publisher: Addison-Wesley
Author: Apple

Inside Macintosh: Volume VI Date: 1st April 1991 Inside Macintosh: Volume VI

Inside Macintosh, Volume 6 Volume VI for Apple Macintosh

Inside Macintosh series is the Apple developer documentation manuals  for the APIs (Application Program Interfaces) and machine architecture of the Macintosh computer.

Volumes 1 to 6. (I to VI)

Kindly donated by Neil Hubbard

Version 7

 

Publisher: Addison-Wesley
Author: Apple

Mac OS X Leopard Edition The Missing Manual Date: 2007 Mac OS X Leopard Edition The Missing Manual

Mac OS X Leopard Edition The Missing Manual for Apple Macintosh

"The book that should have been in the box"

With Leopard, Apple has unleashed the greatest version of Mac OS X yet, and David Pogue is back with another meticulous Missing Manual to cover the operating system with a wealth of detail. The new Mac OS X 10.5, better known as Leopard, is faster than its predecessors, but nothing's too fast for Pogue and this Missing Manual. It's just one of reasons this is the most popular computer book of all time.

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition is the authoritative book for Mac users of all technical levels and experience. If you're new to the Mac, this book gives you a crystal-clear, jargon-free introduction to the Dock, the Mac OS X folder structure, and the Mail application. There are also mini-manuals on iLife applications such as iMovie, iDVD, and iPhoto, and a tutorial for Safari, Mac's web browser.

This Missing Manual is amusing and fun to read, but Pogue doesn't take his subject lightly. Which new Leopard features work well and which do not? What should you look for? What should you avoid? Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition offers an objective and straightforward instruction for using:

  • Leopard's totally revamped Finder
  • Spaces to group your windows and organize your Mac tasks
  • Quick Look to view files before you open them
  • The Time Machine, Leopard's new backup feature
  • Spotlight to search for and find anything in your Mac
  • Front Row, a new way to enjoy music, photos, and videos
  • Enhanced Parental Controls that come with Leopard
  • Quick tips for setting up and configuring your Mac to make it your own

There's something new on practically every page of this new edition, and David Pogue brings his celebrated wit and expertise to every one of them. Mac's brought a new cat to town and Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition is a great new way to tame it.

Table of contents

  1. The Mac OS X Desktop

  2. Folders and Windows

  3. Organizing Your Stuff

  4. Spotlight

  5. Dock, Desktop, and Toolbars

  6. Programs in Mac OS X

  7. Documents, Programs, and Spaces

  8. Time Machine, Syncing, and Moving Data

  9. Automator and AppleScript

  10. Windows on Macintosh

  11. System Preferences

  12. The Free Programs

  13. CDs, DVDs, and iTunes

  14. The Technologies of Mac OS X

  15. Accounts, Parental Controls, and Security

  16. Networking, File Sharing, and Screen Sharing

  17. Printing, Faxing, Fonts, and Graphics

  18. Sound, Movies, and Speech

  19. The Unix Crash Course

  20. Mac OS Online

  21. Internet Setup

  22. Mail and Address Book

  23. Safari

  24. iChat

  25. SSH, FTP, VPN, and Web Sharing

  26. Appendixes

  27. Installing Mac OS X 10.5

  28. Troubleshooting

  29. The Windows-to-Mac Dictionary

  30. Where to Go From Here

  31. The Master Mac OS X Secret Keystroke List

Publisher: OReilly Media
Author: David Pogue

Mac OS X Tiger Edition The Missing Manual Date: 2005 Mac OS X Tiger Edition The Missing Manual

Written by the New York Times columnist David Pogue and published by O'Reilly Media in 2005.

As Apple comes out with another version of Mac OS X, David Pogue hits the streets with another meticulous Missing Manual to cover it with a wealth of detail. The new Mac OS X 10.4, better known as Tiger, is faster than its predecessors, but nothing's too fast for Pogue and Mac OS X: The Missing Manual.

With its hallmark objectivity, the Tiger Edition thoroughly explores the latest features to grace the Mac OS. Which ones work well and which do not? What should you look for? This book tackles Spotlight, an enhanced search feature that helps you find anything on your computer; iChat AV for videoconferencing; Automator for automating repetitive, manual or batch tasks; and the hundreds of smaller tweaks and changes, good and bad, that Apple's marketing never bothers to mention.

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Tiger Edition is the authoritative book that's ideal for every user, including people coming to the Mac for the first time. Our guide offers an ideal introduction that demystifies the Dock, the unfamiliar Mac OS X folder structure, and the entirely new Mail application. There are also mini-manuals on iLife applications such as iMovie, iDVD, and iPhoto, those much-heralded digital media programs, and a tutorial for Safari, Mac's own web browser.

And plenty more: learn to configure Mac OS X using the System Preferences application, keep your Mac secure with FileVault, and learn about Tiger's enhanced Firewall capabilities. If you're so inclined, this Missing Manual also offers an easy introduction to the Terminal application for issuing basic Unix commands.

There's something new on practically every page, and David Pogue brings his celebrated wit and expertise to every one of them. Mac's brought a new cat to town and we have a great new way to tame it.

Table of contents

The Very Basics

  1. The Mac OS X Desktop
  2. Folders and Windows
  3. Organizing Your Stuff
  4. Spotlight
  5. Dock, Desktop, and Toolbar
  6. Applications in Mac OS X
  7. Documents, Programs, and Dashboard
  8. Mac OS 9 Programs—and Windows Programs
  9. Moving Data
  10. Automator and AppleScript

III. The Components of Mac OS X

  1. System Preferences
  2. The Free Programs
  3. CDs, DVDs, and iTunes
  4. The Technologies of Mac OS X
  5. Accounts, Firewalls, and Security
  6. Networking
  7. Graphics, Fonts, Printing, and Faxing
  8. Sound, Movies, Speech, and Handwriting
  9. Terminal: Doorway to Unix
  10. Fun with Terminal
  11. Mac OS X Online
  12. Internet Setup, .Mac, and iSync
  13. Mail and Address Book
  14. Safari, iChat, and Sherlock
  15. SSH, FTP, VPN, and Web Sharing
  16. Appendices
  17. Installing Mac OS X 10.4
  18. Troubleshooting
  19. The “Where’d It Go?” Dictionary (Mac Version)
  20. The “Where’d It Go?” Dictionary (Windows Version)
  21. The Master Mac OS X Secret Keystroke List

Publisher: O'Reilly
Author: David Pogue

Mac OS X Tiger for Dummies Date: 2005 Mac OS X Tiger for Dummies

Mac OS X Tiger for Dummies for Apple Macintosh
"Fully updated! Covers the new features of Mac OS X v10.4"
Mac OS X Tiger For Dummies is divided into five logical parts:

Part I: Introducing Mac OS X
This first part is very, very basic training. From the mouse to the Desktop, from menus, windows, and icons to the snazzy-but-helpful Dock, it’s all here. A lot of what you need to know to navigate the depths of Mac OS X safely and sanely will be found in this section. And although old-timers may just want to skim through it, you newcomers should probably read every word. Twice.
Part II: Rounding Out Your Basic Training
In this part, I build on the basics of Part I and really get you revving with your Mac. Here I cover additional topics that every Mac user needs to know, coupled with some hands-on, step-by-step instruction. It starts with a closer look at the program you’ll be using most, the OS X Finder, followed by a chapter about how to open and save files (a skill you’re sure to find handy). Next comes a chapter about managing your files for maximum efficiency followed by a quick look at using removable media (which means ejectable disks — CDs, DVDs, and even oldies but goodies such as Zip drives). Last, but certainly not least, is a chapter about the importance of backing up your data — and how to do it painlessly.
Part III: Doing Stuff with Your Mac
This part is chock-full of ways to do cool stuff with your Mac. In this section, you’ll discover the Internet first — how to get it working on your Mac, and what to do with it after you do. Next, I show you the ins and outs of printing under OS X. You also read about some of the more important OS X-related applications and features, plus how to make your Tiger look and feel just the way you like it. That’s all followed by the lowdown on the Classic Environment, and possibly the most useful chapter in the whole book, Chapter 13, which details each and every gosh-darned System Preference, filled with useful observations and recommendations.
Part IV: Networking and Troubleshooting
Here I get into the nitty-gritty underbelly of Mac OS X, where I cover somewhat more advanced topics, such as file sharing, creating and using multiple users (and why you might want to), and the all-important troubleshooting
chapter, Chapter 15.

Part V: The Part of Tens
Finally, it’s The Part of Tens, which may have started life as a Letterman ripoff, although it does include heaping helpings of tips, optional software, great Mac Web sites, and hardware ideas.
The Appendix
Last, but certainly not least, I cover installing Mac OS X Tiger in the Appendix. The whole process has become quite easy with this version of the system software, but if you have to install Tiger yourself, it would behoove you to read
this helpful Appendix first.

Contents at a Glance
Introduction ................................................................1
Part I: Introducing Mac OS X Tiger ..............................9
Chapter 1: Mac OS X Tiger 101 (Prerequisites: None) ................................................11
Chapter 2: I Think Icon, I Think Icon . . . .......................................................................27
Chapter 3: About Windows (Not the Microsoft Kind) and Menus ............................53
Part II: Rounding Out Your Basic Training ...................95
Chapter 4: Newfangled Finder .......................................................................................97
Chapter 5: Mastering the Save Sheet and the Open Dialog .....................................117
Chapter 6: File Management without Tearing Your Hair Out ...................................133
Chapter 7: Haggling with Removable Media ..............................................................161
Chapter 8: Back Up Now or Regret It Later ................................................................169
Part III: Doing Stuff with Your Mac ..........................177
Chapter 9: Internet-Working .........................................................................................179
Chapter 10: Publish or Perish: The Fail-Safe Guide to Printing ...............................203
Chapter 11: Application Overload ...............................................................................223
Chapter 12: The Classic Environment: Like Mac OS 9, Only Better ........................257
Chapter 13: What Your Mac Prefers ............................................................................271
Part IV: Networking & Troubleshooting ......................305
Chapter 14: Mine! Miiiiine! Sharing Your Mac and Liking It ......................................307
Chapter 15: Troubleshooting Mac OS X .....................................................................347
Part V: The Part of Tens ...........................................359
Chapter 16: Ten (Or So) Ways to Speed Up Your Mac Experience ..........................361
Chapter 17: Ten (Or So) Ways to Make Your Mac Better by Throwing Money at It ...................................................................................................................371
Chapter 18: Ten (Or So) Great Web Sites for Mac Freaks .........................................377
Chapter 19: Ten (Or So) Mac OS X Apps That You Might Need Someday .............381
Appendix: Installing or Reinstalling Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger (Only If You Have To) .............................389
Index .......................................................................397

Publisher: Wiley
Author: Bob LeVitus

Mac World Complete Mac Handbook Date: 1991 Mac World Complete Mac Handbook

Mac World Complete Mac Handbook for Apple Macintosh.

See Mac World Complete Mac Handbook Plus CD 2nd Edition for a description and contents of the later edition.

 

Publisher: Hungry Minds, 1991
Author: Jim Heid

Mac World Complete Mac Handbook Plus CD 2nd Edition Date: 1993 Mac World Complete Mac Handbook Plus CD 2nd Edition

Mac World Complete Mac Handbook Plus CD 2nd Edition for Apple Macintosh

Jim Heid's Introduction

These days, it’s common for a computer book to include a floppy disk or two with some software. Welcome to the first Macintosh book that includes 235 floppy disks. That’s roughly the equivalent capacity of the Macworld Complete Mac CD tucked into the back cover of this second edition of the Macworld Complete Mac Handbook. What better way to illustrate the diversity of the Macintosh world and the wide range of tasks that a Mac can perform? The Macworld Complete Mac CD gives you the Macintosh world on a silver platter.

So much has happened since the first edition’s release in 1991. The PowerBook, Performa, Centris, and Quadra families were introduced, and the Mac family tree has reached sequoia-size proportions. The Mac line used to be simple and expensive; now it’s complicated and inexpensive. System 7 — the fundamental software that enables the Mac to run — has become the dominant system software in the Mac world. Digital video is pervasive — like it or not, television and personal computers are on a collision course. And Macs have begun to sport the kinds of features that many people always dreamed or dreaded computers would have: the ability to act on spoken commands.

Bigger and Better This second edition covers these new developments and provides greatly expanded coverage of mainstream application areas — word processing, spreadsheet analysis, database management, graphics, communications, and electronic publishing. The chapters in this book are loosely based on the monthly columns, features, and reviews that I’ve been writing for Macworld since 1984. But these aren’t just reprints — far from it. Every chapter contains new sections, illustrations, tables, product listings, and sidebars containing additional background, tips, step-by-step instructions, and insights.

Contents at a Glance

Introduction 1

Part I: Using the Mac 7

Chapter 1: Macintosh Basics 1 1

Chapter 2: Word Processing Basics 49

Chapter 3: Word Processing Tips and Techniques 65

Chapter 4: Fast Formatting with Style Sheets 83

Chapter 5: Spreadsheet Basics 97

Chapter 6: Spreadsheet Tips and Techniques 115

Chapter 7: Database Management Basics 131

Chapter 8: Managing Mail Merge 151

Chapter 9: Desktop Publishing Basics 165

Chapter 10: Desktop Publishing Tips and Techniques 183

Chapter 11: T}q3ography 205

Chapter 12: Font Customizing Tips and Techniques 221

Chapter 13: Painting, Drawing, imd Cad Programs 235

Chapter 14: Image Processing 265

Chapter 15: Three-Dimensional Graphics 293

Chapter 16: Desktop Presentations 311

Chapter 17: Telecommunications Basics 329

Chapter 18: Downloading Freeware and Shareware 347

Chapter 19: Optical Character Recognition 359

Chapter 20: HyperCard 373

Chapter 21 : Multimedia and QuickTime 387

Chapter 22: Music and Soimd 421

Part II: Mastering the Mac 463

Chapter 23: System 7 Tips and Techniques 467

Chapter 24: Maintenance Tips and Techniques 507

Chapter 25: Customizing tlie Mac with Utilities 521

Chapter 26: Mass Storage 561

Chapter 27: Disk Tips, Viruses, and SCSI 585

Chapter 28: Exchanging Data 619

Chapter 29: Troubleshooting 653

Chapter 30: Printer Tips and Techniques 671

Part III: Expanding the Mac 691

Chapter 31 : Upgrading Strategies 695

Chapter 32: Printers 719

Chapter 33: Networking Basics 749

Chapter 34: Input Devices 761

Chapter 35: Power Protection 787

Part IV: Appendixes 797

Appendix A: Using the Macworld Complete Mac CD 799

Appendix B: How the Book and CD Were Produced 809

Appendix C: Macintosh Memory Configurations 817

 

Publisher: IDG Books, 1993
Author: Jim Heid

Mac World Guide to System 7 Date: 1991 Mac World Guide to System 7

Mac World Guide to System 7 for Apple Macintosh

Coinciding with Apple's roll-out of new models, this authoritative guide to Apple's new software reveals undocumented tips not found in the manual and uses a step-by-step visual approach in covering True-Type fonts, virtual memory, aliases, and more. Heavily illustrated.

 

Publisher: IDG Books, 1991
Author: Lon Poole

Mac World Mac Secrets 4th Edition Date: 1997 Mac World Mac Secrets 4th Edition

Mac World Mac Secrets 4th Edition for Apple Macintosh.

Review by John Nemerovski 

With any new Macintosh book, I evaluate its worth on how quickly I can locate valuable information that I can use immediately. Macworld Mac Secrets, Fourth Edition, by David Pogue and Joseph Schorr, rewarded me with these morsels:

The word "secrets" is appropriate to about one third of the information in the book. The other two thirds consist of useful general knowledge about all aspects of the Macintosh, plus helpful tips and tricks to boost your Mac productivity and enjoyment.

Lots of Book for the Buck -- Mac Secrets consists of three components: the massive book (1,208 pages), a respectably packed CD-ROM disk (550 MB), and a Web site for updates to the book and the bundled software. This edition is quite current, demonstrated by a reference to Mac OS 7.6's new installer, and, ironically, to rumors of Apple's potential liaison with Be, Inc.

The authors describe the fourth edition by stating that "everything's different, nothing's changed." The format and feel are consistent with earlier editions, but the look is cleaner and easier to read. On the CD, the custom folder icons from previous editions have been replaced by "plain, boring, ordinary" folders, so they open rapidly.

Pogue and Schorr offer a diversified presentation, including conventional text and occasional entertaining back-and-forth dialogues, plus sidebars of secrets, true facts, case histories, and "Answer Man" solutions. The book is peppered with bulleted bonuses, such as Speed Tips, Exclusives, On the CD, Strange but True, and Worth Learning. For example, one tip worth exploring is "The Golden Troubleshooting Rule: A Clean Install," which explains the benefits of installing all generations of Mac system software from scratch, instead of on top of an existing System.

Chapter 4 is an outstanding, mini-encyclopedia on control panels and extensions, including "The Ultimate Extension-Linking Guide." Troubleshooting your Mac is covered in an excellent 30-page chapter. An extensive glossary and index help readers locate and understand terms, concepts, and the secrets themselves.

More Than Just a Book -- Is this a book or a software package? Pogue and Schorr understand that "despite the countless hours your cheerful authors have spent researching and writing this book, you may well consider the software supplied with this book to be the main course." They're not kidding: a total of 110 different shareware, freeware, and commercial programs and demos fill up the CD-ROM, and the book uses 58 pages explains the software in detail.

A few fully functional titles include: CanOpener, Claris Emailer, DiskFit Direct, TechTool, TypeIt4Me, Remember?, Cyberdog, OpenDoc, and QuickTime. The CD is a veritable software library kept up to date via the book's Web site. (Discount coupons for upgrades and full versions of many commercial applications are also provided.)

On the CD, the software is conveniently listed by chapter, category, author, and a few more groupings, aliased to the Complete Software List. The entire text of the book is on the CD, in searchable Adobe Acrobat format.

 

Publisher: IDG Books, 1997
Author: David Pogue & Joseph Schorr

Mac World Macintosh Secrets Date: 1993 Mac World Macintosh Secrets

Mac World Macintosh Secrets for Apple Macintosh

The biggest secret to getting the most out of this book is understanding its structure. Each topic is divided into two halves. The first part is a general discussion, like a miniarticle. It’s followed by the Secrets: thousands of excellent, undocumented, often never-before-published hints and tips for pushing your Mac to its max.

Part by Part Here’s how the primary book sections are broken down: Part I: System Software Revealed unearths insider information about the free software you got with your Mac — namely, the System software that fills that mound of white System disks (and 4MB of your hard disk). But we won’t mention only the Finder (and aliases and labels and Trash and the Desktop file), but also the important Installer, your control panels, and your Apple menu. And, best of all, this part identifies all the System-folder clutter you can throw out. Part II: Secrets of the Machine takes you into the actual mechanics of the Mac. You won’t go so far in that you’ll need a degree in electrical engineering; you’ll just learn enough of the inner workings to be useful. This part, for example, actually gives a decent explanation of how to use virtual memory. It includes a Disk Chapter, a Memory Chapter, and special coverage of the PowerBook laptops. Chapter 9 even contains detailed Mac-by-Mac model descriptions so that you’ll know what you bought, how it can be upgraded, and how much technology has marched on since you bought your machine. Part III: Application Tips covers the programs you probably use in day-to-day work: major players like Word, Excel, and FileMaker, as well as software like ResEdit that can help make the Mac more yours. This part is a whole book-within-a-book, with enough expert insight to make you say “Wow” at least once on every page. 4 Macworld Macintosh SECRETS Part IV: Attachments is about everything you attach to your computer — printers (and, therefore, fonts), modems (and what to dial up with them), scanners, CD-ROM players, NuBus cards, and networks (includ- ing remote networks and using AppleTalk Remote Access). At the end of this part is a troubleshooting chapter that, among other things, contains our Rule of Three: a troubleshooting trick that solves about 99% of typical mysterious Mac crashes and odd behaviors. Part V: The Macworld Macintosh SECRETS Software Vault describes the 40 fantastic programs that come with this book. And, incidentally, we’ve provided the Macintosh SECRETS Software on three high-density 1.4MB disks. 

Contents at a Glance

Introduction 1

Part I: System Software Revealed 7

Chapter 1: Your First Software: The Finder 7

Chapter 2: Finder Command Secrets 9

Chapter 3: Control Panels, Extensions, and DAs 45

Chapter 4: Everything Else in the System Folder 1 19

Part II: Secrets of the Machine 1 53

Chapter 5: The Performa Chapter 155

Chapter 6: On, Off, and Everything In Between 169

Chapter 7: The Disk Chapter 189

Chapter 8: The Memory Chapter 219

Chapter 9: Mac-by-Mac: What You’ve Got and What You’re Missing 249

Chapter 10: Keyboards and Mice 291

Chapter 11: Monitors 303

Chapter 12: PowerBooks Exposed 321

Chapter 13: Buying and Setting Up 361

Part III: Application Secrets 367

Chapter 14: Multitasking 369

Chapter 15: Word Processing 399

Chapter 16: Page Design 457

Chapter 17: Number & Data Crunching 477

Chapter 18: Graphics 499

Chapter 19: Other Utilities 569

Chapter 21: Multimedia Unmasked 607 Part IV: Attachments 637

Chapter 22: Inside Fonts 639

Chapter 23: Macintosh Printing Secrets 683

Chapter 24: Scanning Secrets 735

Chapter 25: Mysteries of the Modem 745

Chapter 26: A Short CD-ROM Chapter 767

Chapter 27: Mysteries of the SCSI Chain 775

Chapter 28: NuBus and Other Slots 785

Chapter 29: The Networking Chapter 793

Chapter 30: Troubleshooting 835 Part V: The Macintosh Secrets Software Vault 851

Introduction to Part V 853

Chapter 31: The Macintosh SECRETS Commercial Software 857

Chapter 32: The Macintosh SECRETS Shareware 929 A Final Dialogue 959

Appendix A: Glossary 961

Disk Contents at a Glance 1016

Installation Instructions 1020

 

 

Publisher: IDG Books, 1993
Author: David Pogue and Joseph Schorr

MacFourier Manual Date: 1991 MacFourier Manual

MacFourier Manual for Apple Macintosh.

MacFourier Software for the Apple Mac from Oxford
For undergraduate students studying the principles and applications of Fourier Analysis.
The mathematical techniques underlying Fourier Analysis are shown at work on real data, and the graphic form of the results enables students to see the effects of their application. A set of operators is provided which can be applied to, and combined with, a set of basic functions consisting of both real and imaginary components. Fast Fourier transforms and
inverse transform conventions may be applied, and the results examined, modified, or saved in either graphic or numeric form.
Hardware requirements:
Apple Macintosh computer with minimum 512Kb RAM, System version 4.1 or higher, and most printers.
Price: £175 (UK customers add VAT, overseas customers add £10 postage and packing)
Site licences are also available.

Publisher: Oxford University Press
Author: Benjamin Selinger, Ralph Sutherland, Marilyn Olliff, Jo Ward

Macintosh Repair & Upgrade Secrets Date: April 1990 Macintosh Repair & Upgrade Secrets

Macintosh Repair & Upgrade Secrets for Apple Macintosh.
First Edition
Preface from Larry Pina

Every month, at various user group meetings, I listen to people with Macintosh hardware failures. Their story is always the same. They've been told that the Macintosh can't be repaired. New circuit boards cost hundreds of dollars! Some people are on their third or fourth boards. Well, the fact of the matter is that the Macintosh can be repaired—very easily. This book shows you how.
Beginning with the Macintosh power supply, I show you how to make repairs at the component level. No special technical skills are required, only the ability to read and follow directions. Even if you've never held a soldering gun before, this information could save you hundreds of dollars. But the manufacturer doesn't sell replacement parts—so there's no way Macintosh computers can be repaired!
Unlike the proprietary ROM chips on the logic board, there's nothing special about the resistors, filter caps, and rectifiers on the power-supply board. Some parts are readily available from Radio Shack. Others have to be mail ordered. Replacement parts are no problem, as long as you know which parts to ask for and where to send for them. Throughout this book, that's exactly what you'll learn. The symptoms listed in these chapters are real. The fixes are real. The
methods presented here were perfected long ago. They work for me; they work for others; they're going to work equally well for you.

Chapter 1 Safety Rules—Tools and Techniques 1
Chapter 2 Preliminary Checks 19
Chapter 3 Adjustments 41
Chapter 4 Power Supply Problems 55
Chapter 5 Video Problems 81
Chapter 6 Dead Sets 109
Chapter 7 Power Supply Upgrades—Fans 125
Chapter 8 Audio Upgrades 145
Chapter 9 Video Upgrades 159
Chapter 10 Disk Drive, RAM, ROM, and SCSI Upgrades 175
Chapter 11 Keyboard Repairs 207
Chapter 12 Mouse Repairs 223
Chapter 13 Lisa/Macintosh XL Repair Secrets 235
Chapter 14 Macintosh SE Repair Secrets 281
 
Kindly donated by Bill Henley

Publisher: Hayden Books
Author: Larry Pina

MPW Command Reference - Apple Macintosh Programmer's Workshop Date: 1993 MPW Command Reference - Apple Macintosh Programmer's Workshop

MPW Command Reference for Apple Macintosh Programmer's Workshop (MPW) Version 303 Ref: 030-4058-A.


Macintosh Programmer's Workshop (MPW) was a software development environment for the Classic Mac OS operating system and was an important tool for developing applications for System 7.x and Mac OS 8.x and 9.x. It was  part of Apple's professional developers program, but became a free download after it was superseded by CodeWarrior. On Mac OS X it was replaced by the Project Builder IDE (Integrated Development Environment, which eventually became Xcode.

MPW provided a command line environment and tools, including 68k and PowerPC  assemblers,  Pascal,  C  and  C++  compilers. The  Unix like shell was designed around the Macintosh's character set and GUI, using  a worksheet interface, rather than the usual terminal one, allowing the user to select and run sections of a shell script or to redo commands. In addition, command line tools were provided with a graphical interface named Commando. The debuggers were not integrated but the language compilers supported the symbolic debugging information file format and a source-level debugger called SADE (Symbolic Application Debugging Environment) which was not an MPW Tool but had a user interface similar to MPW. Apple's compilers had some features that were not common on other platforms—for example, the Pascal compiler was object-oriented, while the C and C++ compilers included support for length-prefixed strings (needed for Pascal-oriented APIs).

As Pascal was the original preferred language for Macintosh software development, MPW was initially released with only Pascal support. A C compiler was released with MPW 2.0. The MPW C compiler was written under contract for Apple by Greenhills, a Macintosh-variant of the Green Hills C compiler designed specially for Apple and similar to that of Apple Lisa Workshop.

MPW Command Reference is a command dictionary that describes each of the scripts, tools, and built-in commands available for use with the Macintosh Programmer's Workshop (MPW), as described above. Following the command dictionary are appendixes describing the special characters and operators.

Sections of the Reference

For each entry, the reference begins with a heading line that includes the command name and a label indicating whether the command is a script, tool, or built-in command.

For each command, the reference provides the following information:

 Syntax -- a concise listing of the syntax for invoking the command

 Description -- an explanation of the command's function

 Input -- information on the command's input

 Output -- information on the command's output

 Status -- a list of possible status codes and their meanings

 Parameters -- a description of each of the command's parameters

 Options -- a description of each of the command's options

For some commands, the reference also includes these sections:

 Alias Resolution -- information about the command's ability to resolve Finder aliases

 Examples -- examples of how to use the command

 Limitations -- a list of limitations, special cases, or warnings

 See Also -- references to related commands or information

Platform: Apple Macintosh 68K processor

               Mac OS System 7 and above

Application Software (AS:) Integrated Development Environment

Version: 303

Publisher: Digital
Author: Apple

Sad Macs, Bombs, and Other Disasters and What To Do About Them Date: March 1997 Sad Macs, Bombs, and Other Disasters and What To Do About Them

Sad Macs, Bombs, and Other Disasters and What To Do About Them, Third Edition for the Apple Macintosh,  according to the publisher is the definitive guide to have on hand when your Apple Macintosh rolls a bomb in your general direction. (For the MacNovice, the bomb indicates a terminal system error.) The book is the complete guide to troubleshooting the Mac, and has an entry for every imaginable disaster that might befall your Mac from bootup to shutdown. Along the way, you'll find some incidental treasure--advice on tuning your Mac, using virtual memory, decoding the deep mysteries of the System Folder, and performing routine maintenance tasks to keep your system cranking along at top speed. This edition also features new information on PCI Macs, PowerPC Powerbooks, coverage of Mac System 7.5/7.6 issues, and an entirely new chapter on Internet protocols, Web browsers, PPP and similar issues emphasizing "problems and solutions."

Sad Macs is not only well written, it's elegantly organized. Besides the kind of comprehensive index you might wish for in a troubleshooting guide, the author also includes an elaborate "Symptom Index." The final third of the book is devoted to "Fix-It" guides to specific problem sets, such as diagnosing problems with system extensions, and throughout these guides are usefully cross-referenced. If you've got a Mac, this is an essential utility, and a must-have desktop reference guide.

Book Info
Contents include information on Mac OS 9, FireWire, USB, iMacs, iBooks, G4s, QuickTime 4, DVD drives, infrared connections, cable modems, what to do when the system freezes, how to handle memory problems, strategies for managing extension snafus, how to overcome Internet connection hurdles, and more.

Platform: Apple Macintosh 

               Mac OS System 7 and above

Publisher: Peachpit Press; 3rd edition (March 1997)
Author: Ted Landau

The Apple Macintosh Book Date: 1984 The Apple Macintosh Book

The Apple Macintosh Book by Cary Lu. The first edition was released with the Macintosh 128K in 1984. The second edition covered the Macintosh 512K, while the third edition covered six Macintosh models in all. The fourth edition of the book (published in 1992) covered 21 models (including discontinued models, such as the Macintosh 128K), and even included mentions of the Macintosh Classic series, the Macintosh Quadra series, the PowerBooks, and System 7.

Lu was founding managing editor of High Technology, technology editor for Inc. and a columnist on future technology for Inc. Technology. He wrote columns and articles for Macworld magazine and other computer and technology publications.

Publisher: , 1984
Author: Cary Lu

The Dead Mac Scrolls Date: January 1992 The Dead Mac Scrolls

The Macintosh Bible Guide to Saving Thousands on Mac Repairs : How to Fix Hundreds of Hardware Problems Without Going Bankrupt

The Dead Mac Scrolls is a 484 page do-it-yourself guide to repairing Apple Macintosh personal computer hardware problems in the most cost-effective way. Written by Larry Pina, the book was amongst other titles written by Pina for repairing Macintoshes. The book  was first published in 1992, and is now out of print.

Introduction by Larry Pina
This book is like a family medical guide, except that it covers the Macintosh family of computer equipment. Reading it won't grant you a doctor's degree, but it will enable you to recognize common symptoms and correctly diagnose hardware problems.
The purpose of this book is to save you money. By looking up symptoms before you call for service, you can get a good idea of what's wrong and how much repairs should cost.
Every page describes a unique symptom, with text and illustrations (if you can't find the symptom you're looking for, check the Symptom index at the back of the book). Then there's a diagnosis of the problem (generally to the component level) and a suggested solution . Finally, each page provides three different cost estimates for effecting repairs.

CONTENTS

Introduction 7
Guides for do-it-yourselfers 9
1. Early Macs 11
2. Mac SE and SE/30 144
3. Mac II 221
4. Floppy disk drives 243
Problems and solutions 244
Replacing disk drive heads without test instruments 265
5. Hard drives and other peripherals 277
6. External monitors 309
7. lmageWriter I (standard & wide) 348
8. lmageWriter II 374
9. LaserWriter and LaserWriter Plus 402
10. LaserWriter II SC, NT and NTX 442
Parts vendors and service providers 466
Symptom index 470

Kindly donated by Bill Henley

Publisher: Goldstein & Blair
Author: Larry Pina

The iMac Book Date: 1999 The iMac Book

'The iMac Book for the  Apple Macintosh iMac

From the blurb:  is the complete technology and cyberculture resource on Apple's new iMac for beginning computer users.  You will learn how the Mac Operating System works, as well as your option to run more than 30 other operating systems on your iMac, including Windows 95/98.  Additionally, you will discover how to troubleshoot problems, choose upgrade paths, add peripherals, and increase your computer memory by yourself.

This book is written for:

Publisher: Coriolis
Author: Don Rittner

The Little Mac Book Date: April 1991 The Little Mac Book

The Little Mac Book for Apple Macintosh. Ideal pocket reference covers System 7. Perfect companion to award winning The Big Mac Book, 2nd Edition.

This book was kindly donated by Rodney Dale

Publisher: Que (April 1991)
Author: Neil J. Salkind

The Macintosh Bible 7th Ed Date: 1998 The Macintosh Bible 7th Ed

The Macintosh Bible 7th Ed for Apple Macintosh through OS 8.5.

Extensively revised from the last, best-selling version, The Macintosh Bible, 7th Edition is a comprehensive reference for Mac users from novice to expert. Its packed with information on computing basics, Mac applications, software updates, including coverage of Mac OS 8.5, the Internet, and more, all presented in the clear, friendly style that has earned the Macintosh Bible millions of fans. The companion Web site provides tips, news, and updates on Mac developments.

The Macintosh Bible is billed as the "most popular Mac book ever," and reviews for earlier editions (from Macworld, the New York Times, and Byte among others) are almost universally superlative. No wonder. Sharon Zardetto Aker, who has authored and/or collaborated on each edition of The Macintosh Bible since the third, offers thousands of hints and inside suggestions that will be invaluable to even the most seasoned Mac user. This time, her attention extends to material through Mac OS 8.5 and issues of concern to iMac owners. Topics treated in depth include: beginning with a Mac, hardware, the operating system, other system elements, productivity software, creativity software, and connections. More than 80 percent of the material is new in this edition. The revised version especially excels in its attention to minutiae, encompassing issues as far-ranging as "zapping the PRAM" (that's the 24K parameter RAM that retains control panel and date/time settings, etc.) or the "Color Menu addition" to SimpleText (SimpleText Color Menu is a shareware utility that adds some cool functionality to the basic Mac text processor). In fact, you can pick just about any page in the Bible and find some new Web site or new function that will expand the power of your Mac or iMac. This one is essential. Updates will be continuously available at the readers-only Web site (password information is hidden in the book). --Patrick O'Kelley

Part 1 : For Beginners Only 
Chapter 1: Welcome to Macintosh
Part 2: Hardware 
Chapter 2: Basic Hardware
Chapter 3: Peripherals
Chapter 4: Storage
Part 3: The Operating System 
Chapter 5: The Interface
Chapter 6: The Desktop
Chapter 7: More Desktop
Chapter 8: System Software
Chapter 9: The System Folder
Chapter 10: Other System Stuff
Chapter 11: Intro to OS 8.5 
Part 4: Other System Elements
Chapter 12: Applications and Documents
Chapter 13: Using Memory
Chapter 14: Fonts
Chapter 15: Printing
Part 5: Productivity Software 
Chapter 16: Word Processing
Chapter 17: Spreadsheets
Chapter 18: Databases
Part 6: Creativity Software 
Chapter 19: Graphics
Chapter 20: Page Layout
Chapter 21: Web Page Design
Chapter 22: Music, Movies, and More
Part 7: Special Areas 
Chapter 23: PowerBooks
Chapter 24: Problems and Preventions
Chapter 25: Facts and Fun
Part 8: Connections 
Chapter 26: Networks
Chapter 27: The Online Universe
Chapter 28: The World Wide Web
Part 9: Appendices 
Appendix A: The Tipster List
Appendix B: Vendor Contact Information

Publisher: Peachpit Press, 1998
Author: Sharon Zardetto Aker

The Macintosh Bible 'What Do I Do Now Book'? Second Edition Date: 1991 The Macintosh Bible 'What Do I Do Now Book'? Second Edition

The Macintosh Bible 'What Do I Do Now Book'? Second Edition for Apple Macintosh. "what to do instead of panicking" 

From the preface of the 3rd Edition:

This book attacks Macintosh trouble from three directions: basic knowledge, conceptual problems, and operating problems. The first part, basic knowledge, covers the fundamentals of Mac hardware and system software, explains the types of things that can go wrong, shows how to avoid some common problems, and offers general advice about how to troubleshoot and solve problems on your own. If you read Part 1 (chapters 1-7) from start to finish, you will know more about the Macintosh than half the people now using them, and you will be that much better prepared to rescue yourself from problem purgatory.

Parts 2, 3, and 4 cover conceptual problems and operating problems that occur as you use the Mac. By conceptual problems, I mean problems that arise from misunderstandings about what's going on. In the majority of problem situations, the computer and software are functioning perfectly — it's the user's level of understanding that needs repairs.

Part 1 builds a foundation of understanding, a barrier between you and problems that arise out of ignorance; the conceptual problems and solutions in the other three parts deal with specific problems.

Parts 2, 3, and 4 cover the most common operating problems — actual hardware and software malfunctions — as well. Part 2 (chapters 8-17) is devoted to general problems with Macintosh system software. It's organized in functional areas having to do with different types of Mac operations. Most of the problems you'll have with a Mac are software-related, even if they don't appear to be, so check this section first for specific problems you have with your Mac. For example, a display problem with your monitor may be due to an improper software setting. Problems like this are covered in Chapter 13.

Part 3 (chapters 18-21) covers hardware problems that are unique to specific Macintosh computers, monitors, and printers. These problems are far less likely, but if you've tried software solutions to no avail, then this is where you should look next. Part 4 (chapters 22-28) deals with problems you may run into while using seven of the best-selling Macintosh application programs. Most Mac owners use at least one of these programs. Space prohibits me from covering more than a dozen or two problems for each program, but I've tried to highlight the ones that seem to give most people trouble.

 

Publisher: Goldstein & Blair, c1991
Author: Charles Rubin

Totally Rad Mac Programs Date: 1992 Totally Rad Mac Programs

"... brings together the best and funniest software available to jazz up your Macintosh - over 20 entertaining programs gleaned from dozens of shareware, freeware and commercial sources"
A book and disk by Owen W. Linzmayer and a host of programmers who hacked together the programs.
Contains 23 "Cool, Hip, Fun, & (shhh!) Useful Programs", public domain, shareware and commercial programs based on the Apple Macintosh. Each program was chosen for its enjoyment rather than productivity value. Individual chapters describe what each program does and a 800K disc was included.

Publisher: Sybex
Author: Owen W Linzmayer

Up & Running With Mac System 7 Date: September 1991 Up & Running With Mac System 7

For Apple Macintosh.
Provides advice to Macintosh computer users on how to install and use the System 7 operating system to update and improve their computer system.
List Price:  $10.95

Publisher: Sybex
Author: Craig Danuloff

Zen and the Art of Resource Editing Date: 1992 Zen and the Art of Resource Editing

Zen and the Art of Resource Editing for Apple Macintosh
ResEdit lets you custom edit parts of your Mac software, such as icons, menus, dialog boxes, pointers, patterns, and more. Packed with the hottest tips about editing sources, this book is the third edition in the BMUG series. The CD-ROM contains resource files that readers can use to implement into a system.
BMUG guide, 3rd edition
Includes:
How you can use ResEdit to your benefit.
Tips to ensure that you use ResEdit safely.
Information about using ResEdit with System 7.

Publisher: Peachpit Press
Author: Jens Peter Alfke, Tom Chavez, Chris Holmes, Lisa Lee, Brendan McCarthy, Leonard Morgenstern, Brian Novack, Blaise R. Pabon, Rick Reynolds, Cliff Stoll, James W. Walker, and Steve Yaste

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