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OS/2 Warp Version 3 on Floppy Disk

Operating System/2 (OS/2 Warp) was originally developed as a joint project between IBM and Microsoft. It's intention was to replace the antiquated Disk Operating System (DOS) as the operating system of choice. At the time, DOS was at version 3.x, and IBM and Microsoft both realized that with the advent of the Intel 80286 in the mid-1980's, it was quickly becoming obsolete. Thus, OS/2 was born, initially as a 16-bit, command-line based operating system. Microsoft worked closely with IBM up to version 1.3. While IBM worked on the "guts," they worked on the new graphical user interface that was due for later versions. OS/2's kernel was developed by IBM from the ground up as the Personal Computer (PC) version of a mainframe operating system, with all of the time-slicing, stability, and other features previously existing solely on those high-end machines.

Around this time (circa 1990), Microsoft's other project, Windows, now at version 3.0, was starting to gain popularity with some users. Previously, Windows had been little more than a task-swapping shell for DOS applications, and was intended to compete with QuarterDeck's DesqView. Users found it appealing becaused it contained some of the GUI elements that were being developed for OS/2. A decision was made to drop all support for OS/2, and go strictly with Windows. However, because of the history they had with IBM, and because they still used so much of their technology (Object Linking and Embedding [OLE] aka ActiveX and Component Object Model [COM] are derived from Dynamic Data Exchange [DDE]), Microsoft to this day maintains a broad-ranging cross-licensing agreement with them. Windows NT was partially based on the OS/2 work that they did for IBM, and Windows 95 also borrows heavily from this code.

With Microsoft no longer doing development on the user interface, IBM was faced with creating this themselves. In this timeframe, a deal was made with Commodore. Commodore licensed IBM's REXX scripting language for inclusion in their AmigaOS, and IBM took many GUI design ideas from the AmigaOS for their new GUI. With the release of OS/2 2.0, the WorkPlace Shell (WPS) user interface was born. OS/2 was now a 32-bit operating system, with a fully object-oriented graphical user interface. Based on IBM's System Object Model (SOM), the WorkPlace Shell is still the model for all graphical user interfaces, since nothing else has come even close to providing the same functionality. OS/2 2.1 and 2.11 followed, including a version of 2.11 with full Symmetric Multi-Processing (SMP) support. OS/2 2.x won over many Windows 3.x users because of it's ability to run Windows programs seamlessly, while maintaining a stable system, something that Windows had trouble doing. IBM even went so far as to trademark the term "Crash-Proof."
 
Our boxed set with manuals and the BonusPak which includes Internet, Fax, IBM Works, Multimedia and more was kindly donated by Morcum Lund


Platform : PC
Format : 3.5 Floppy Disk
Publisher : IBM
Authors :
Date : Unknown

Other Software by IBM:

Item Manufacturer Platform Format Date
OS/2 Warp Connect IBM PC 3.5" disks & CD Rom Unknown
IBM PC 3270 Emulation Program Entry Level Version 1.2 IBM PC DOS 3.5" & 5.25" Floppy Disk Unknown
OS/2 Warp Version 3 on CD-ROM IBM PC CD-ROM Unknown
OS/2 Warp Version 3 on Floppy Disk IBM PC 3.5 Floppy Disk Unknown
Disk Operating System IBM PC 5.25 disk 1981
DOS 3.30 Programming Family IBM PC 5.25 disk & 3,5 Disk 1981
Asynchronous Communications Support IBM PC DOS 5.25 Disk 1982
Basic Programming Development System IBM PC DOS 5.25 Disk 1982
Guide to Operations IBM PC 5.25 Floppy disk 1983
Fixed Disk Organizer Productivity Family IBM PC 5.25 disk & 3,5 Disk 1983
Macro Assembler Version 2.00 IBM IBM PC & PCjr 5.25" Floppy Disk 1984
PC DISK IBM DOS 3.30 5 1/4" Disc Apr 1984
IBM DOS 3.1 IBM PC DOS 5.25 Disk 1985
IBM DisplayWrite 4 IBM PC 5.25" Floppy Disk 1986
IBM Demo Presentation Manager IBM IBM PC 5.25" Floppy Disk 1987
DOS 3.30 Reference Manual IBM PC Manual 1987
MS-DOS 3.3 IBM MS-DOS 5.25" 1987
DOS 3.3 Programming Family IBM DOS 3.30 Apr 1987
IBM Personal System/2 Model 30 286 Guide To Operations and Starter Diskette IBM PC 1988
IBM PS/2 Model 30 Starter Diskette IBM PS/2 1988
IBM PC/HOST Terminal Emulator IBM PC 3.5 Disk 5.25 Disk 1989
IBM Personal System/2 Model 55SX Quick Reference Guide and Reference Diskette IBM IBM PS/2 3.5" Floppy Disk 1990
IBM Personal System/2 Model 95XP Quick Reference IBM IBM PS/2 3.5" Floppy Disk 1990
IBM RS/6000 Power Station & Server software IBM RS/6000 1990
IBM RS/6000 Diagnostic Disks IBM RS/6000 1990
DOS 5.0 IBM PC 3.5" Disk 1992
OS/2 Version 2.1 on Floppy Disk IBM PC 3.5 Floppy Disk 1993
IBM PC DOS 6.3 for Preload IBM PC DOS 6.3 1994
IBM DOS 7 OEM Preload IBM PC DOS 7 1995
The Developer Connection for OS/2 & LAN Systems IBM CD-ROM 1995
IBM AIX V4.3.2 for RS/6000 IBM RS/6000 1999
IBM AIX V4.3.2 for RS/6000 IBM RS/6000 1999
IBM ViaVoice for Mac IBM Apple Macintosh CD-ROM 2000

Information About IBM:

Item Manufacturer Date
IBM Unknown

 

 

 

This exhibit has a reference ID of CH12539. Please quote this reference ID in any communication with the Centre for Computing History.
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