Latest Additions

Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

Power PC Board

Power PC Board

Released by Kolff Computer Supplies in 1990, the Power PC Board provides IBM XT emulation for Amiga A500 and A2000 computers.

This version two board features an NEC V30 processor running at 10MHz. It supports floppy drives and hard drives (with a special driver). It has 1MB of RAM, allowing it to emulate MGA, CGA, EGA, and VGA graphics modes. It communicates with the Amiga using the internal serial port at up to 19.2kb/s. It can also access the Amiga's floppy controller and parallel port. A battery-backed clock and emulated PC sound card are also supported. It is only compatible with PAL Amigas.

 
Cossor Data Processor

Cossor Data Processor

Cossor Trainer Unit

 

 
Commodore PET 4008

Commodore PET 4008

The Commodore PET 4008 was the base model of the 4000 series with just 8K of RAM.

It offered BASIC 4.0 as standard and a lower price point that made them attractive to schools.

 
Apple iMac G5

Apple iMac G5

The iMac G5 is an all-in-one desktop computer designed and built by Apple Inc. from 2004 to 2006. It was the final iMac to use a PowerPC processor, making it the last model that could natively run Mac OS 9 (Classic) applications. It was replaced in 2006 by the Intel iMac.

 
Olivetti M21

Olivetti M21

'The Olivetti Personal Computer M21 is a transportable computer system, designed to provide the versatility and computing power required in the modern business environment.

The Olivetti Personal Computer M21 is a complete computer system, providing the full range of hardware and software options normally associated only with desktop personal computers. Based on the Intel 8086 microprocessor, the M21 supports the following operating systems:

  • MS-DOS
  • Concurrent CP/M-86
  • UCSD p-System

With these operating system options, users can choose from a vast range of application software to meet their processing needs.

A comprehensive set of programming languages is also provided, for users who want to develop their own applications:

  • BASIC
  • COBOL
  • Pascal
  • FORTRAN
  • C Language
  • Assembler

The flexibility of the system's software is matched by its hardware. Memory capacity starts at 128K bytes and can be expanded to 640K bytes. In terms of external storage, the system offers a variety of options:

  • 320/360K byte diskette(s)
  • 640/720K byte diskette(s)
  • 10 Mbyte hard disk unit

The system supports an integrated 9" monochrome video, this video provides advanced graphics features with a maximum resolution of 640 x 400 pixels. If a larger screen is required, or colour output is wanted, either of the M24's 12" videos can be connected.

The keyboard is a compact, industry-standard 83-key input device. During transit the keyboard is attached to the front of the basic module, thus protecting the video.'

 
Scorpion 3 Light Gun

Scorpion 3 Light Gun

  • 100Hz compatible Light Gun
  • Works with all PlayStation and PlayStation2 gun games
  • GunCon and GunCon2 compatible
  • Laser targeting
  • Auto Reload and Auto Fire function
  • Manual Reload, Single Button Reload
  • Light weight

 
Elektronika MK-52

Elektronika MK-52

The Elektronika MK-52 (Russian: Электро́ника МК-52) was an RPN-programmable calculator manufactured in the Soviet Union during the years 1983 to 1992. Its original selling price was 115 rubles.

The functionality of the MK-52 was identical to that of the Elektronika MK-61, except that the MK-52 had an internal non-volatile EEPROM memory module for permanent data storage, a diagnostic slot, and a slot for ROM modules. The programming language and functionality of the MK-52 and MK-61 calculators were extensions of the earlier MK-54, the B3-34, and B3-21 Elektronika calculators. The MK-52 is the only calculator known to have internal storage in the form of an EEPROM module. All Soviet calculators are renowned for having a very large number of undocumented functions.

The MK-52 was used as a backup to onboard computers of the Soyuz spacecraft during the Soyuz TM-7 mission to the Mir space station.

In what would be considered an unusual practice today (but was common for Soviet electronics), technical schematics were provided for the MK-52 when it was purchased, prompting user modification and repair of the machine.

 
Iomega CRE-01A Floppy Plus 7-in-1 Card Reader

Iomega CRE-01A Floppy Plus 7-in-1 Card Reader

This USB-powered disk drive from Iomega can read and write 3.5" floppy disks, as well as various solid-state memory cards:

  • Compact flash I and II card
  • SmartMedia cards
  • MultiMediaCard (MMC) media
  • Memory Stick media
  • Memory Stick Pro media
  • Secure Digital memory (SD-card)
  • Micro Drive cards

 
Matsucom OnHand PC

Matsucom OnHand PC

The OnHand PC (pictured here in the DS-20 dock) was released in 1998 by the Japanese company Matsucom. It featured 2MB of non-volatile storage and ran an operating system known as W-PS-DOS version 1.16. It had 128KB of RAM, with an additional 128Kb of ROM. The device's screen is a 102x64 STN 4-greyscale LCD which uses a timed backlight to save power.

Data could be entered either by using the joystick mounted to the front of the watch or by synchronizing data from a full-sized PC using the included software. A program called HandySurf also allows synchronizing internet content, such as Yahoo! News Headlines.

Communication with other devices is either through a 38,400 bit/s serial port dock, or through the 9,600 infrared link, the transmitter of which is mounted to the upper middle of the watch. It is possible to link two Onhands via this infrared link to play various two-player games.

The OnHand PC was discontinued by Matsucom on April 7, 2006.

 
Unknown Mechanical Calculator

Unknown Mechanical Calculator

Unfortunately, this mechanical calculator with printer is missing it's manufacturer and model number badges.

 
GNT 3406 Paper Tape Punch

GNT 3406 Paper Tape Punch

The GNT 3406 paper tape punch was released by GN Telematic in 1976. It features a spooling system which allows the punched tape to wind itself automatically.

 
Hewlett Packard HP-85

Hewlett Packard HP-85

Similar in appearance to the IBM 5100 from five years earlier in 1975, the Hewlett-Packard HP-85 is an all-in-one portable computer system with a built-in keyboard, 5" screen, thermal printer, tape storage unit, and the BASIC programming language.

 
Telemod 2 V23 Modem

Telemod 2 V23 Modem

From the front of the box: "Telemod 2 links microcomputers to Prestel, Micronet 800, and other viewdata services. you can communicate directly with other users."

 
Belkin F5D7011 Wireless G Card

Belkin F5D7011 Wireless G Card

This PCMCIA card allows a laptop computer to access wireless networks using the 802.11g 2.4GHz standard.

 
Apple Async Printer Interface Card

Apple Async Printer Interface Card

Printer interface card, asynchronous, for the Apple II.

 
Hektor Peripheral Board

Hektor Peripheral Board

Homemade board designed to connect to the Open University Hektor peripheral port. Purpose unknown.

 
Open University Hektor III

Open University Hektor III

Hektor III
 
CPU: 8085
RAM: 6KB
ROM: 14KB

Educational Computer made by Open University for a Systems Analysis Course. The Hektor III followed the Hektor II and featured updated ROM firmware and support for lower-case letters.

This Hektor III features EPROMs instead of mask ROMs and has a sticker inside reading 'V8E prototype firmware'.

 
SGI Indigo 2

SGI Indigo 2

The Indigo 2 (codename "Fullhouse") was as successor to the Indigo series as a highend desktop workstation. It used the R4400 CPU and Extreme graphics.

 
The Megaprocessor

The Megaprocessor

The Megaprocessor is a microprocessor built on a huge scale.  It consists of seven panels, is two metres high and nearly ten metres end-to-end.  It was built by James Newman, of Cambridge, as a hobbyist's project.  Since the Megaprocessor is not based on any single computer or chip architecture, it is a unique machine, the only one of its kind in the world.  It arrived at the Centre on 20 October 2016 and is currently on display in the foyer.

The project began with Newman's desire to learn about transistors.  The transistor is the fundamental component of modern electronics.  It switches or amplifies electrical power, allowing for the creation of logic circuits.  Today they are mostly produced in integrated circuits, with millions or billions of them crammed onto a microchip.  Newman used discrete transistors: individual components you can count in the palm of your hand.

This makes the Megaprocessor a huge recreation of a device that, in practical electronics, would be tiny.  The advantage of this approach is educational.  Newman said:

“Computers are quite opaque. Looking at them, it’s impossible to see how they work. What I wanted to do was get inside and see what’s going on. Trouble is we can’t shrink down small enough to walk inside a silicon chip. But we can go the other way; we can build the thing big enough that we can walk inside it. Not only that we can also put LEDs on everything so we can actually see the data moving and the logic happening.”

The Megaprocessor runs at a top speed of around 20khz and can be slowed down to 0.01hz.  Programs can be halted and stepped through cycle by cycle.

256 bytes of RAM is included on a separate panel, with each bit represented by an LED.  The board is approximately 2m2.  On this scale, 32GB of RAM - a commonplace amount in performance PCs -  would need a panel the size of the United Kingdom.

There are over 10,500 LEDs and 40,000 individual transistors on the system.  Newman made more than a quarter of a million solder joints during construction.

For more information on the Megaprocessor, please visit Newman's site, www.megaprocessor.com.

 
Prototype 'Slogger' Electron Products

Prototype 'Slogger' Electron Products

Assorted prototype boards from Slogger Electron Products. Includes Pegasus 400 Disc Interface.

 
AIO Serial and Parallel Apple Interface

AIO Serial and Parallel Apple Interface

The AIO Serial and Parallel Apple Interface from SSM Microcomputer Products allows the user to connect an external parallel or serial driven device, like a terminal or printer, to the Apple II computer. The AIO uses two software controllable LSI (Large Scale Integration) chips for the parallel and serial interfaces to give the user maximum flexibility in configuring to system needs.

The included manual covers cable connections; serial and parallel setup; sample applications; use of included firmware and software; troubleshooting; and software listings and schematics.

 
BeebOPL Kit (Assembled)

BeebOPL Kit (Assembled)

The BeebOPL is a modern peripheral designed for the BBC Micro. It functions as an FM synthesizer using the Yamaha OPL chip. From the manual:

"This easy to assemble and install card transforms your computer into a powerful synthesiser which will faithfully reproduce the sound of a single instrument or an entire orchestra.

"In fact, it uses the same digital sound technology as the best electronic keyboard, so you hear rich, rumbling base, crystal clear highs, and true up-front mid-range. It also has up to 11 discrete channels for up to 11 different instruments and game sounds playing at once. You can listen to the sound straight from the speaker of your BBC Microcomputer and with the built-in pre-amplifier and output jack you can even listen to it on your home stereo."

Kit fully assembled with original manual, packing list, and schematic.

 
Philips CD-i Touchpad 22ER9017

Philips CD-i Touchpad 22ER9017

Joypad controller for "CDI-2**" series CD-i players. 12 foot (3.6m) cord.

 
HandyPort Wireless RS-232 Transceiver

HandyPort Wireless RS-232 Transceiver

This pair of wireless transceivers can connect two DE9 serial ports wirelessly.

Specifications:

  • 2.4GHz frequency hopping spread spectrum
  • D-sub 9P female connector
  • Maximum 20dBm (100mW) output power
  • Typical -80dBm receive sensitivity
  • 1.2 ~ 115.2 Kbps scalable baud rates
  • 2 LEDs for status indication (operation, link)
  • Reset button for factory setting recovery and user reconfiguration
  • SMA interface for external antenna (dipole or patch)
  • DC jack for external power feeding (+5V ~ 12V)
  • User reconfigurable locally and remotely; no extra software needed
  • CE certified (registration number G5M203060109-C)

 
Sega Saturn Arcade Racer

Sega Saturn Arcade Racer

This official racing controller for the Sega Saturn allows analogue control of racing games.

 
Micro Peripheral's 5.25

Micro Peripheral's 5.25" Disk Drive

5.25" floppy disk drive by Micro Peripherals Inc. Model 51SM; manufactured March 1983. Note the striped label on the bottom of the drive, used for calibrating the rotation rate with a strobe lamp.

 
Dacom Unity+ Gold

Dacom Unity+ Gold

8-bit ISA modem expansion by Dacom. Features:

  • V21/V22/V22bis/V23 PC Model
  • MNP5 error correction/data compression
  • Datatalk communications software

 
Acorn A540 ARM3 CPU with FPA10

Acorn A540 ARM3 CPU with FPA10

The 33MHz Archimedes A540 ARM3 CPU with FPA10 floating point accelerator installed.

 
Mark XIV Bomb Sight

Mark XIV Bomb Sight

The Mark XIV Computing Bomb Sight was a vector bombsight developed and used by Royal Air Force Bomber Command during the Second World War. The bombsight was also known as the Blackett sight after its primary inventor, P. M. S. Blackett. Production of a slightly modified version was also undertaken in the United States as the Sperry T-1, which was interchangeable with UK-built version.

Developed in 1939, the Mk. XIV started replacing the First World War-era Course Setting Bomb Sight in 1942. The Mk. XIV was essentially an automated version of the Course Setting sight, using a mechanical computer to update the sights in real-time as conditions changed. The Mk. XIV required only 10 seconds of straight flight before the drop, and could account for shallow climbs and dives as well. More importantly, the Mk. XIV sighting unit was much smaller than the Course Setting sight, which allowed it to be mounted on a gyro stabilization platform. This kept the sight pointed at the target even as the bomber manoeuvred, dramatically increasing its accuracy and ease of sighting.

The Mk. XIV was theoretically less accurate than the contemporary Norden bombsight but was smaller, easier to use, faster-acting and better suited to night bombing. It equipped the majority of the RAF bomber fleet; small numbers of Stabilized Automatic Bomb Sights and Sperry S-1s were used in specialist roles. A post-war upgrade, the T-4, also known by its rainbow code Blue Devil, connected directly to the navigation computer to automate the setting of windspeed and direction and further increase accuracy. These equipped the V Bomber force as well as other aircraft.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Mark XIV bomb sight", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

 
Phonemark Quick Data Drive Model 8500

Phonemark Quick Data Drive Model 8500

Designed for the Commodore 64 for computer program/data loading and saving.

Features:

  • High speed: 15 times audio cassette.
  • Speed selection: 892 or 14000 bits/second.
  • Reliable: 1 soft error in 10 7 bits transferred.
  • Fully computer controlled operation.
  • Drive-in-use indicator.

 
Phoenix ROM Sharer

Phoenix ROM Sharer

This internal accessory allows a Commodore Amiga 500/1500/2000 owner to switch between two different Kickstart ROM versions at the flick of a switch.

 
Commodore Amiga 2090 Hard Disk/SCSI Controller

Commodore Amiga 2090 Hard Disk/SCSI Controller

The Commodore Amiga 2090 Hard Disk/SCSI Controller supports both ST506 hard disks and SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) systems. Both 3.5" and 5.25" drives can be installed.

In addition, the A2090 can function as a SCSI "host adapter", allowing you to connect one or more external SCSI storage subsystems such as hard disks, tape streamers, or combined disk/tape systems. Most external SCSI subsystems designed for the Macintosh Plus will plug directly into the rear connector of the A2090 controller.

 
Apple IIe Extended 80-Column Text Card

Apple IIe Extended 80-Column Text Card

This expansion card for the Apple IIe adds support for 80-column text mode and also provides a 64K memory expansion.

 
Nintendo GameCube Broadband Adapter

Nintendo GameCube Broadband Adapter

This accessory for the Nintendo GameCube allows on-line play over the telephone network. This is the Japanese version.

 
WKK Remote Control System

WKK Remote Control System

This third-party infra-red controller for the Sega Mega Drive was produced by WKK Industries. Two wireless controllers can be used at once. A similar system was available for the Sega Master System.

 
Sun Ultra 60

Sun Ultra 60

The Ultra 60 is a fairly large and heavy computer workstation in a tower enclosure from Sun Microsystems. The Ultra 60 was launched in November 1997 and shipped with Solaris 7. It was available in several specifications.

 
Atari Game Controller (Alamogordo Atari Dig)

Atari Game Controller (Alamogordo Atari Dig)

This controller is one that was dug up from the Alamogordo, New Mexico desert.

The 'Atari Tomb' is a landfill site in the New Mexico desert full of Atari games, peripherals and other stock.  The story surrounding it became one of the great myths of the gaming industry.  

In 1983, the young videogame industry in North America collapsed.  One of the reasons for this was saturation of the market.  Atari, one of the giants of the industry, was left with a mountain of unsold and returned stock as consumers lost confidence in gaming.  This useless stock was dumped in a landfill site near Alamogordo, New Mexico, beginning in September 1983.

The games industry quickly recovered and became an entertainment giant.  Soon, Atari items of this vintage became desirable, and myths spread about what lost treasures might be buried in the Tomb.  The amount of speculation led to some doubt as to whether the burial site even existed.

In April 2014, an excavation took place as part of the production of a documentary on the topic.  Some 1,300 cartridges were excavated out of an estimated 728,000, and other items such as peripherals were also recovered.  They have become symbols of the early days of the gaming industry.

 
Solidisk PC Plus

Solidisk PC Plus

80168 second processor for the BCC Master 128. Unusually mounted in an external enclosure.

 
The Magnus Connection

The Magnus Connection

A computer resource pack for the offshore oil industry. Part of the Microelectronics Education Programme by BP Educational Service. Includes VHS tape, card reader, ID cards, keyboard overlays, and resource pack.

 
ACP 08 Disk Interface

ACP 08 Disk Interface

This disk interface for the Acorn Electron was produced in 1986 by Advanced Computer Products.

 
HP F1015A DOS-compatible cable

HP F1015A DOS-compatible cable

For connecting HP Palmtop PCs and HP-48 to DOS PCs.

 
Pre-printed Port-a-Punch Cards

Pre-printed Port-a-Punch Cards

These 80-column punched cards are pre-printed with the locations for IBM alphanumeric code punches. Intended for use in teaching environments.

 
marchant AC1M Adding Machine

marchant AC1M Adding Machine

Electro-mechanical adding machine.

 
Compaq Armada 4160T

Compaq Armada 4160T

Pentium-class machine laptop. Shipped with Windows 95.

 
Matrox Rainbow Runner

Matrox Rainbow Runner

This daughterboard expansion for the Matrox Mystique graphics card adds extra hardware to enable high-resolution Motion JPEG video capture and editing. It also has a composite TV-out connector and hardware MPEG1 decoder for full-screen video playback.

Pictured here attahced to the Matrox Mystique graphics card.

 
Home-made Acorn Atom ROM Switcher

Home-made Acorn Atom ROM Switcher

This home-made expansion box for the Acorn Atom allows the user to switch between multiple ROMs at the press of a button.

 
Linux Gaming Computer

Linux Gaming Computer

This Linux-based touch-screen computer was originally designed in the US for the Chuck E Cheese franchises. It was brought over to the UK in order to seek venture funding from Amadeus Group.

 
Sun Ultra 1

Sun Ultra 1

The Ultra 1 is a family of Sun Microsystems workstations based on the 64-bit UltraSPARC microprocessor. It was the first model in the Sun Ultra series of Sun computers, which succeeded the SPARCstation series. It launched in 1995 and shipped with Solaris 2.5. It is capable of running other operating systems such as Linux and BSD.

The Ultra 1 was available in a variety of different specifications. Three different CPU speeds were available - 143 MHz (Model 140), 167 MHz (Model 170) and 200 MHz (Model 200). The Ultra 1 Creator3D 170E launched in November 1995 with a list price of US$27,995.

 
Newbury 7003 Terminal

Newbury 7003 Terminal

This terminal from Newbury Laboratories Ltd is designed to connect to computers over an RS-232 serial link. An optional local printer can be connected to create hard copy.

 
EG3008 Video Genie II System

EG3008 Video Genie II System

EG3008 Video Genie System - Third Version

Video Genie (or simply Genie) was the name given to a series of computers produced by Hong Kong-based manufacturer EACA during the early 1980s. They were compatible with the Tandy TRS-80 Model I computers and could be considered a clone although there were hardware and software differences.

The computers making up the series were

    * Video Genie System (EG3003 - first version, early/mid 1980)
    * Video Genie System (EG3003 - second version, late 1980) - our unit
    * Genie I (EG3003 - third version, late 1981)
    * Genie II (EG3008 - late 1981)
    * Genie III (EG3200 - mid 1982) - a more business-oriented machine with CP/M-compatibility.

Although Video Genie was the name used in Western Europe, the machines were sold under different names in other countries. In Australia and New Zealand they were known as the Dick Smith System 80 MK I (EG3003) and System 80 MK II (EG3008). In North America they were sold as the PMC-80 and PMC-81.

Features

 CPU: Zilog Z80, at 1.76 MHz
 Video: Monochrome
           64x16 / 32x16 uppercase text
           128x48 block graphics
           Composite video output, cable included
           RF tv signal output, cable included
 16 KB RAM, expandable to 48 KB
 12 KB ROM containing Microsoft LEVEL II BASIC
 Storage: Built in 500 baud cassette deck
           Cable for using an external cassette deck included
 Built in powersupply

The EG 3008 is complete with:
EG 100 Monitor
EG 3013 Expander
EG 400 Disk drive unit

 
British Antarctic Survey

British Antarctic Survey "Micro" (caseless)

We are grateful to Michael Pinnock of the British Antarctic Survey for the following description of this exhibit:

A custom-made microcomputer used by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) on its Antarctic research stations, ships, aircraft, and its Cambridge research institute. It was primarily designed for controlling and logging data from experiments (e.g. automatic weather stations, airborne geophysics, shipborne oceanography) but could also be used for data and text processing.

Its design evolved in the early 1980's (1980-1982) and some 25 of them were produced by 1985. The last unit was taken out of service in 2003 - at that time it was still reliably logging geomagnetic field data at BAS's Halley research station.

Based around a Motorola 6809 processor, it ran the Flex operating system.

The design owes much to the rapidly evolving Cambridge microcomputer scene in the early 1980's, e.g. the first processor board used was an Acorn Atom design, although later units had a custom made processor board.

Additional design details from Jim Turton:

The BAS micro was indeed spawned from the SWTPC and Flex. However the hardware was more similar to the CMS (Cambridge Microprocessor Systems) board, which was a single board 6809 computer that also ran Flex DOS. This was also inspired by the Acorn Atom single boards around at the time. Acorn mostly used the 6502 processor - later used in the BBC Micro, but it did make a 6809 version. Although Acorn never used Flex like CMS. Essentially we cribbed this idea to design our own 19 inch card frame board. We designed the hardware and it was laid out on PCB by one Arthur Bartrum of 'Batvale' in Sutton. The processor board had 6809 processor and 8k of static memory plus address decoding only. We also developed our own bootstrap monitor which had some powerful debugging features. Additional cards had an ACIA (6851) serial port (for RS232) terminal comms, a PIA (6820) for a parallel printer port and a PIA for disc interface. Other cards had vaarious custom interfaces such as ADC's and DAC's for experiment interfacing.

For the printer we used the Epson RX80 dot matrix printer then the FX80 (or the other way round). The system supported two 5.25in floppy drives. One for the Flex DOS and programs and the other for data.

 
Intel A80386DX-20

Intel A80386DX-20

Intel i386 32-bit processor.

 
Intel 16/4 MCA Token Ring Adapter

Intel 16/4 MCA Token Ring Adapter

This Intel MicroChannel adapter allows you to connect a PS/2 computer to a TokenRing network.

 
Sound to Light Converter

Sound to Light Converter

This board was designed by Mike Cook and converts signals from the BBC Micro's cassette cable to signals which can be read from the user port. From there software would convert the data into colour visuals on screen. Originally published in The Micro User Body Build series.

 
Hom-made ZX80 Memory Expansion

Hom-made ZX80 Memory Expansion

This home-made memory expansion is designed to connect to the Sinclair ZX80.

 
Pioneer UC-V109BC Barcode Scanner

Pioneer UC-V109BC Barcode Scanner

This barcode reader is designed to connect to a Pioneer Laserdisc player to control which audio tracks and video sequences play.

 
Answer Box 100

Answer Box 100

This barcode scanner is designed to connect to a Laserdisc player and allows the user to control it by scanning barcodes. The player can be commanded to play a series of frames, switch audio tracks, or turn the video on/off.

Our Answer Box 100 is packaged as part of 'An Interactive Videodisc package for Initial Teacher Trainers' published by 'The Technical & Vocational Educational Intiative'. This package also includes a Laserdisc and two copies of the supporting book.

 
Prototype ZXpand PCBs

Prototype ZXpand PCBs

Two prototypes of the ZXpand MMC board for the Sinclair Spectrum.

 

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