Latest Additions

Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

Atari 800 - 16K Memory Module

Atari 800 - 16K Memory Module

'This easily installed module allows you to expand the memory capacity of your ATARI 800 personal computer system.  It enables you to write longer programs, store more data, and run Atari 810 Floppy Disk Recorders.'

 
Pioneer PX-7(BK)

Pioneer PX-7(BK)

The Pioneer PX-7 is an MSX1 computer, aimed at the Japanese market. It was meant for attaching to a Laserdisc player, and as such has Superimpose capabilities. The PSG sound is stereo, contrary to almost all MSX machines.

The PX-7 was available in black and in silver with lilac keyboard keys. This PX-7 is the PX-7(BK) which was released in the UK in black.

A graphic tablet (PX-TB7) was also sold with the Palcom PX-7. With this you could create illustrations, shapes and various backgrounds, then store up to 8 of these shapes with their respective animation programmes into the computer memory.

The LD-700 Laser Disc Player was also sold as an option. When linked to the Palcom PX-7, the computer could entirely control it and exchange information.

Pionner also sold the ER-101 interface (Laser Vision) unit which made it possible for all MSX computers to have the same functionalities as the Palcom PX-7.

 
Rockwell AIM-65 computer (grey case)

Rockwell AIM-65 computer (grey case)

This Rockwell AIM-65 computer is housed in a grey plastic case.

 
Computer Stop 16K RAM Board

Computer Stop 16K RAM Board

This expansion board for the Apple II adds 16K RAM.

 
Titan Technologies Accelerator II

Titan Technologies Accelerator II

The Accelerator //e was released in 1984 by Titan Technologies (formerly Saturn Systems), and was an upgraded version of the original Saturn Accelerator, in response to the introduction of the Apple IIe. The card maintained the 64 KB of RAM of the original card and added the newer 65c02 microprocessor. This card solved the Auxiliary RAM incompatibility problem of the older card, however it did not speed up this second bank of RAM which was common on the Apple IIe.

 
Sound Blaster CT1350B (late model)

Sound Blaster CT1350B (late model)

Sound Blaster SB2.0 8 bit Sound Card 1991 Reference: CT1350B
 
The Sound Blaster family of sound cards was for many years the de facto standard for audio on the IBM PC compatible system platform, before PC audio became commoditized, and backward-compatibility became less of a feature.
 
The creator of Sound Blaster is the Singapore-based firm Creative Technology, also known by the name of its United States subsidiary, Creative Labs.
 
Sound Blaster 2.0 added support for "auto-init" DMA, which assisted in producing a continuous loop of double-buffered sound output and increased the maximum playback rate to 44 kHz (the same maximum as the Sound Blaster Pro, released around the same time). The earlier Sound Blaster 1.0 or 1.5 could be upgraded to support auto-init DMA by replacing the socketed V1.00 DSP with a V2.00 DSP, which was available from Creative Labs.-

 
Rockwell AIM-65 computer (caseless)

Rockwell AIM-65 computer (caseless)

The Rockwell AIM-65 computer was a development computer based on the MOS Technology 6502 microprocessor introduced in 1976. The AIM-65 was essentially an expanded KIM-1 computer. Available software included a monitor with line at a time assembler/disassembler, BASIC interpreter, assembler, Pascal, PL/65, and FORTH development system. Available hardware included a floppy disk controller and a backplane for expansion.

The AIM 65 (R6500 based Advanced Interactive Microcomputer) is an under $500 microcomputer, complete with keyboard, display and hard copy printer. It has extensive options, many interfaces and expansion capabilities. The AIM 65 is also a mini-development system at the price of most evaluation boards. In addition to bare board blue-coller versions, the AIM 65 is available in an enclosure, complete with power supply, for use as a desk top computer. 

Standard software included the system console monitor software in ROM, called Advanced Interactive Monitor. It featured line assembler, disassembler, setting and viewing memory and registers, starting execution of other programs and more. Single stepping was made possible using non-maskable interrupt (NMI). The command prompt was the less-than sign "<", and on receiving a single character command, it added this input character and the greater-than sign ">". If the thermal printer was turned on, this would be output on a single line. The monitor included a number of service routines that could be accessed and used by a user's program to control I/O and code execution, and was fully documented, including source code.

The machine featured dual cassette tape control. This made it possible to write large assembly programs using the two pass assembler ROM. Source code in text was written twice consecutively to the input tape, and then the assembler, which could start/stop the input cassette tape using motor control was invoked. During the first pass the symbol table was built and stored in RAM. During the second pass symbols would be translated and code written out to the second tape, also using start/stop motor control. Being able to avoid storing code in RAM made it possible to save much space. It was however, still important to keep the symbols list short since RAM size was often no more than 4 KB.

PRICE: US $375 w/1K RAM

ORIGIN U.S.A. 1976
BUILT-IN LANGUAGE Optional Basic ROM
KEYBOARD Full-stroke keyboard
CPU Rockwell 6502 @ 1MHz
RAM 4 KB (up to 32 KB of static RAM)
ROM 12 KB
TEXT MODES 20-digit alpha-numeric LED

There are 5 ROM sockets available for program installation, but 2 of them are normally occupied by the Monitor/Text Editor. The Monitor can be considered the Operating System, since it provides the over-all system control. 

The three remaining ROM sockets can be used for user-defined programs to be installed. BASIC, PASCAL, FORTH, or an Assembler/disassembler can also be installed, although the PASCAL ROMS require an additional expansion module. 

The AIM 65 can directly interface with external peripherals with its two 8-bit bi-directional parallel ports, a 9600 baud serial port, 4 control lines, and 2 timers.

 
Cosmac Super Elf

Cosmac Super Elf

The SuperElf single-board computer was made by Quest Electronics. It was an improvement of the Netronics Elf and Elf II training boards, also based on the RCA 1802, one of the first RISC microprocessors.

The board also featured an 1861 video chip that was closely tied to the 1802 to generate a video image of 128x64 dots.

2, 4 or 6 7-segment Led display could be used. Its hexadecimal keyboard allowed programs to be entered and controlled more efficiently thanks to 8 function keys:

  • I - Input
  • L - Load mode
  • R - Reset
  • G - Go (run mode)
  • W - Wait (processor clock could be stopped)
  • M - enable Monitor ROM
  • S - Single step
  • P - Protect memory

The main board had connections for a speaker (and a circuit to drive the speaker). Sound was entirely software driven as the hardware simply had a single digital output bit (Q) tied to an LED and also to the speaker.

An optional expansion board could be added, providing serial port (software driven), cassette interface (also software driven), 1 KB ROM monitor, optional 2K tiny basic, 4 KB RAM. 2 S-100 slots where additional static memory or a video board could be used. Along with a Super Monitor, there where two versions of pitman's tiny basic, one that used the 1861 video chip and another that used a 64 characters x16lines s-100 video board.

The cassette's output used the same 'Q' output used for audio on the main board, which meant that you heard all of your data as it was written out to cassette.

The 9 LEDs along the left side of the keypad indicate the state of the 'Q' output, the current operating mode (Load, Reset, Run, Wait) as well as the current state of the CPU (Fetch, Execute, DMA, Interrupt).

 
Jupiter Ace

Jupiter Ace

The Jupiter ACE was a British home computer of the 1980s, marketed by a company named Jupiter Cantab. The company was formed by Richard Altwasser and Stephen Vickers, who had been on the design team for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum.

The Jupiter ACE somewhat resembled a ZX81 in a white case, with black rubber keys like the Spectrum. It displayed output on a television, and programs could be saved and loaded on cassette tape, as was standard at that time. The machine came with 3 KB RAM, expandable to 49 K. While it had only one video mode, text only, which displayed 24 rows of 32 columns of characters in black and white, it was possible to display graphics, by redefining the 8×8 pixel bitmap of any of the 128 characters. Like the ZX Spectrum, the machine's audio capabilities were restricted to beeps of programmable frequency and duration, output through a small built-in speaker.

The major difference from the 'introductory computer' that was the ZX81, however, was that the Jupiter ACE's designers, from the outset, intended the machine to be for programmers: the machine came with Forth as its default programming language. Though this gave a great speed advantage over the interpreted BASIC that was used on other machines, it did, along with the meager sound and graphics capabilities compared to the upcoming competition, keep the ACE squarely in a niche market. Sales of the machine were never very large. The reported number of Ace’s sold before Jupiter Cantab closed for business was around 8,000. Surviving machines are quite uncommon, fetching quite high prices as collectors items.
   Jupiter Aces General Specifications.
  • CPU: Z80A running at 3.25 MHz
  • Language: O/S: Ace Forth [not a standard fig-Forth or Forth-79].
  • ROM: 2 x 4kB Eproms containing the FORTH compiler and editor.
  • RAM: 3 kB expandable to 51kB.
  • Program Storage: 1500 baud cassette tape.
  • Video Display: 32 x 24 Monochrome Graphics, High Res: 64 x 48,
    all 128 characters redefinable.
  • Keyboard: 40 key rubber membrane, with auto-repeat on every key,
    and two shift keys allow ASCII codes to be produced.
  • Sound: Single channel buzzer.
  • Interfaces: TV connector [UHF TV set to Channel 36], Cassette port x2: Ear & Mic,
    power (9v), two edge connectors: first has a complete address and data lines from
    the cpu, Second: has data and some selection lines.
  • Size: 215 x 190 x 30 mm.
  • Wait: 246g.
  • Documentation: 182 page Users manual.
 
 
The above information was taken from http://www.jupiter-ace.co.uk/  Further information can also be found at www.jupiter-ace.com

 
Heathkit ET-3400 Trainer

Heathkit ET-3400 Trainer

The Heathkit/Zenith MicroComputer Learning System model ET-3400 was a very popular item designed to teach principles of computers and programming at Universities in the 1970s., and to educate the students of internal computer hardware and software components by self-assembly and programming the machine in pure Hexadecimal language.

It was delivered in assembled or Kit form. It also featured a prototype area and could be used as a design aid for developing special interface circuitry with common 6820 parallel interface or 6850 asynchronous chips.

Several software in ROM were also available. Among them an Assembler and a Tiny BASIC.

Built-in Language
Monitor in ROM
Keyboard
17 keys Hexadecimal keypad
Cpu
Motorola 6800 then 6808 (1981) and 6802 (1987)
Speed
1 MHz
RAM
256 bytes expandable to 1 KB
ROM
1 KB
Display
6 x 7-segment LEDs
Size/weight
30.5 (W) x 30.5 (D) x 10.15 (H) cm. / 2 Kgs
Price
$199.95 Kit, $279.00 assembled

 
Sound Blaster Pro Value Edition

Sound Blaster Pro Value Edition

The Sound Blaster Pro, announced in May 1991, was the first significant redesign of the Sound Blaster card's core features, and complied with the Microsoft MPC standard. The Sound Blaster Pro supported faster digital input and output sampling rates (up to 22.05 kHz stereo or 44.1 kHz mono), added a "mixer" to provide a crude master volume control (independent of the volume of sound sources feeding the mixer), and a crude high pass or low pass filter. The Sound Blaster Pro used a pair of YM3812 chips to provide stereo music-synthesis (one for each channel). The Sound Blaster Pro was fully backward compatible with the original Sound Blaster line, and by extension, the AdLib sound card. The Sound Blaster Pro was the first Creative sound card to have a built-in CD-ROM interface. Most Sound Blaster Pro cards featured a proprietary interface for a Panasonic (Matsushita MKE) drive. The Sound Blaster Pro cards are basically 8-bit ISA cards, they use only the lower 8 data bits of the ISA bus. While at first glance it appears to be a 16-bit ISA card, it does not have 'fingers' for data transfer on the higher "AT" portion of the bus connector. It uses the 16-bit extension to the ISA bus to provide the user with an additional choice for an IRQ (10) and DMA (0)m channel only found on the 16-bit portion of the edge connector.

 
Creative PC-DVD Encore 5x

Creative PC-DVD Encore 5x

This upgrade kit from Create labs combined a 5x-speed internal DVD drive with an MPEG-2 accelerator decoding board. The DVD video was overlaid onto the computer's display using a video pass-through cable.

 
Sound Blaster 16 PCI

Sound Blaster 16 PCI

In 1998 Creative Technology acquired Ensoniq and subsequently released the Sound Blaster 16 PCI. The Sound Blaster 16 PCI was based on Ensoniq AudioPCI technology and is therefore unrelated to the ISA Sound Blaster 16, Sound Blaster 16 VIBRA and Sound Blaster 16 WavEffects. It has no dedicated hardware for Adlib/OPL support, instead using the Ensoniq sample-synthesis engine to (somewhat poorly) simulate it. It is General MIDI compatible in most games.

Our Sound Blaster 16 PCI is sealed in it's original box and has the following idenitfying marks:

  • Serial number: M4740220074497
  • Model number: SB4740
  • Product part number: 5047401001

 
Timex Sinclair 1000

Timex Sinclair 1000

The Timex Sinclair 1000 (TS1000) was the first computer produced by Timex Sinclair, a joint-venture between Timex Corporation and Sinclair Research. It was launched in July 1982.

The TS1000 was a slightly-modified Sinclair ZX81 with an NTSC RF modulator instead of a UK PAL (Units sold in Portugal have a PAL RF modulator) device and the onboard RAM doubled to 2K. The TS1000's casing had slightly more internal shielding but remained the same as Sinclair's, including the membrane keyboard. It had black-and-white graphics and no sound. It was followed by an improved version, the Timex Sinclair 1500.

Like the Sinclair ZX81, the TS1000 used a form of BASIC as its primary interface and programming language. To make the membrane keyboard less cumbersome for program entry, the TS1000 used a shortcut system of one-letter "keywords" for most commands (e.g. pressing "P" while the cursor was in "keyword mode" would generate the keyword "PRINT"). Some keywords required a short sequence of keystrokes (e.g. SHIFT-ENTER S would generate the keyword "LPRINT"). The TS1000 clued the user in on what to expect by changing the cursor to reflect the current input mode.

The TS1000 sold for $99.95 in the US when it debuted, making it the cheapest home computer to date at the time of its launch (its advertising angle was "the first computer under $100".) This pricing initiated a price war with Commodore International, who quickly reduced the price of its VIC-20 to match and later announced a trade-in program offering $100 for any competing computer toward the purchase of a Commodore 64. Since the TS1000 was selling for $49 by this time, many customers bought them for the sole purpose of trading it in to Commodore.

The black-and-white display showed 32 columns and 24 lines, 22 of which were normally accessible for display, with 2 reserved for data entry and error messages. The limited graphics were based on geometric shapes contained within the operating system's non-ASCII character set. The only form of long-term storage was a home tape cassette recorder. The 16K memory expansion sold for $49.95. A shortage of the memory expansions coupled with a lack of software that would run within 2K meant that the system had little use for anything other than an introduction to programming. Home computer magazines of the era such as Compute! showed enthusiasts how to interface the computer with various kinds of equipment, providing the opportunity for learning about early speech synthesis technology through a Speak & Spell, robotics control through the memory port, and scrolling text displays for advertising.

Over time, the TS1000 spawned a cottage industry of third-party add-ons designed to help remedy its limitations. Full-size keyboards, speech synthesizers, sound generators, disk drives, and memory expansions (up to 64K) were a few of the options available. Languages such as Forth and Pascal, as well as BASIC compilers and assemblers augmented the TS1000's programming possibilities. Microcomputing magazine published an article in April 1983 decrying the membrane keyboard ("The designers of the Timex-Sinclair 1000 ... reduced this important programming tool to a fraction of the required size") and describing how to wire up external full-size keyboards.

Type Home computer
Release date July 19
Discontinued 1983
Operating system Sinclair BASIC
CPU Zilog Z80A @ 3.25 MHz
Memory 2 KB

Our model is missing the sticker with the model number and a serial number, but is otherwise in excellent condition and complete with the original packaging and manual.

 
ICL Perq 3A

ICL Perq 3A

The PERQ 3A (otherwise known as the ICL 3300 Advanced Graphics Workstation) was developed by ICL as a replacement for the PERQ 2 in 1985. The PERQ 3A had an all-new hardware architecture based around a 12.5 MHz Motorola 68020 microprocessor and 68881 floating-point unit, plus two AMD 29116A 32-bit bit slice processors which acted as graphics co-processors. It also had up to 2 MB of RAM, a SCSI hard disk and was housed in a desktop "mini-tower"-style enclosure. The operating system was a port of UNIX System VRelease 2 called PNX 300. Prototype units were produced in 1985, but the project was cancelled before full production commenced (the project had run late and ICL decided it was a solution provider - it would sell Sun workstations as part of the solution).

 
Weide ST-M2V2

Weide ST-M2V2

This expansion board, sold by Weide Elektronik, provides an additional 512KB of RAM for the Atari ST.

 
NEC jubilee/Economatics Computer Interface

NEC jubilee/Economatics Computer Interface

This expansion board connects to the BBC Micro's user and analogue ports. It appears to be for use in an electronics lab or classroom environment. It provides the following features:

  • Two tactile button inputs
  • Eight DIP switch inputs
  • LED display of tactile/DIP switch states
  • Three analogue op-amps
  • One inverting schmitt trigger
  • Motor, with slotted disc interrupting an opto-isolator input
  • Connector for microphone input
  • Child board with three red, three green, and two amber LEDs. Connector is amrked "traffic light socket".
  • Off-board connectors for digital input/outputs and four analogue inputs.

While we have no documentation for this item, "NEC" is almost certainly not the PC manufacturer. Economatics were a UK company that supplied input/output control boxes and 'turtle' robots for Acorn (and later PC) computers.

 
Aleph One ARM3 Upgrade

Aleph One ARM3 Upgrade

This upgrade kit was produced by Aleph One Ltd in 1989. It upgrades the processor in an Acorn Archimedes from an ARM2 to a 60MHz ARM3. Also included were instructions for installing the upgrade, along with instructions for upgrading the system's memory controller to the MEMC1a chip - a required upgrade before the ARM3 CPU can be installed. Our copy of this manual is marked up with typographical corrections and may be a pre-release copy.

 
Amstrad DDI-1 / FD-1

Amstrad DDI-1 / FD-1

The Amstrad DDI-1 was sold as a set consisting of a DDI-1 (Disk Drive Interface) and an FD-1 3-inch disk drive. It also came with a CP/M 2.2 disk and license. This set was intended for the CPC-464 which did not come with a built-in 765 floppy disk controller.

The FD-1 disk drive was also sold seperately where it could be used as a secondary drive for the CPC-664, CPC-6128, and for the CPC-464 with DDI-1 attached.

 
Power Play Joystick Interface

Power Play Joystick Interface

This cartridge connects to the expansion port on a ZX Spectrumand allows the user to connect a single joystick.

 
RC2014

RC2014

The RC2014 is a kit computer based on the Z80 processor.  The Z80 was a highly popular processor used in 1970s and 1980s home computers, from which the RC2014 is based.

The RC2014 'is not a clone of anything specific, but there are suggestions of the ZX81, UK101, S100, Superboard II and Apple I...It nominally has 8K ROM, 32K RAM, runs at 7.3728MHz and communicates over serial at 115,200 baud.'  It was designed to allow for modular expansion, either with modules supplied by the makers of the RC2014 or with homemade additions.  It boots into Microsoft BASIC and can also be programmed with Z80 machine code.

Our RC2014 is complete in kit form with assembly instructions.  Also included is a trump card for the system, produced by the donor and designed to match the Home Computer Trump Cards sold through our shop.

Reference: http://rc2014.co.uk/, 16/07/2017.

 
RM Nimbus PC-486/66

RM Nimbus PC-486/66

This 1993 PC-compatible computer from Research Machines was powered by a 486 processor and shipped with up to 16MB of RAM. It typically shipped with a Mitsumi CD-ROM drive connected via a SoundBlaster expansion card.

 
Freecom Power CD

Freecom Power CD

This external CD-ROM drive connects via the PC's parallel port. Capable of reading discs recorded under the following formats:

  • MS-DOS CD-ROMs (High Sierra, Mode 1 and Mode 2 according to ISO9660)
  • CD-ROM XA
  • Kodak Photo-CD (single and multi-session)
  • Audio CDs can be played back and read from (with the appropriate software)

 
US Robotics Sportster Voice 28.8 Faxmodem

US Robotics Sportster Voice 28.8 Faxmodem

External serial modem, featuring:

  • Hardware based V.24/MNP 2-4 error control and V.42 bis/MNP 5 data compressions
  • Transmit speeds of up to 28,800bps with throughput to 115,200bps
  • Compatible with the following standards: V.34, V.32 bis, V.32, V.22 bis, Bell 212A/V.22, V.23, V.25, and Bell 103/V.21 modems
  • Useable with Class 1 or Class 2.0 fax software
  • Plug and play compatible
  • Useable as a full duplex speakerphone

 
RM Nimbus NB300

RM Nimbus NB300

This PC-compatible laptop from Research Machines shipped with up to 5MB of RAM.

 
Acorn Business Computer (ABC)

Acorn Business Computer (ABC)

The Acorn Business Computer (ABC) was a series of microcomputers announced at the end of 1983 by the British company Acorn Computers. The series of eight computers was aimed at the business, research and further education markets. However, the ABC range was cancelled before any of the models were shipped to customers. The ABC 210 was subsequently relaunched as the Acorn Cambridge Workstation, sold in modest numbers to academic and scientific users.

The ABC range was developed by Acorn essentially as a repackaged BBC Micro, expanded to 64 kB RAM, to which was added (in some models) a second processor and extra memory to complement the Micro's 6502. The electronics and disk drives were integrated into the monitor housing, with a separate keyboard.

The Zilog Z80, Intel 80286 and National Semiconductor 32016 were all used as second processors in the various models. Two of the eight models produced, the Personal Assistant and the Terminal, had no second processor.

 
Acorn System 4

Acorn System 4

he System 4 is disc-based computer housed in a double height rack with the capacity for up to 14 Eurocards. The minimum configuration is:

  • 1MHz 6502 CPU
  • VDU Interface
  • 16K RAM
  • Floppy disc controller with 2 floppy disc drives mounted in the top half of the rack.

This System 4 case contains some of the eurocards, but is missing the two disk drives that fit in the top rack. Also there is only an 8K static RAM card, and no Operating System in ROM.

 
Acorn System 5

Acorn System 5

The Acorn System 5 is a disc-based computer mounted in a card cage. The card cage can hold 10 cards and 2 floppy disc drives.

More information is available here.

 
Raspberry Pi Zero (packaged with MagPi magazine)

Raspberry Pi Zero (packaged with MagPi magazine)

Released at the end of 2015, the Raspberry Pi Zero is the smallest and cheapest computer in the Pi range.   It was launched at a retail price of just $5.  Our Pi Zero came free with Issue 40 of MagPi, the official magazine for the Raspberry Pi, which retailed at a cost of £5.99 - more expensive than the Zero itself.  It remains in that original packaging.

Specification:

  • 1GHz, Single-core CPU
  • 512MB RAM
  • Mini-HDMI port
  • Micro-USB OTG port
  • Micro-USB power
  • HAT-compatible 40-pin header
  • Composite video and reset headers
  • CSI camera connector (v1.3 only)

 
Kindle DX

Kindle DX

The Kindle DX was part of Amazon's Kindle range of e-readers.  E-readers first gained popularity in the mid-2000s and, by 2017, digital book sales have become an important part of the publishing market. 

 Display: 9.7" diagonal paper display with E Ink Pearl technology, 1200 x 824 pixel resolution at 150 ppi, 16-level gray scale, 10:1 contrast ratio.

Size: 10.4" x 7.2" x 0.38".

Weight: 18.9 ounces.

 
Apple iMac G3 (Tray Loading, Blue)

Apple iMac G3 (Tray Loading, Blue)

The iMac G3 was the first model of the iMac line of personal computers made by Apple Inc. (formerly Apple Computer, Inc.). The iMac G3 is an all-in-one, luggable personal computer, encompassing both the monitor and the CPU in a single enclosure. Originally released in striking bondi blue and later a range of brightly colored, translucent plastic, casings shipped with a keyboard and mouse in matching tints.

The company announced the iMac on 6th May 1998 and started shipping on 15th August 1998. The launch of the iMac was a landmark event for its time, and had a massive impact on both the company and the computer industry.
 
Our Model:Grape Imac Power PC G3
Power PC G3 233 MHz
512k cache/32MB
4GB Hard Drive
24X CD drive -tray loading
Rage Pro 6MB SGRAM

 
Apple iMac G3 (Tray Loading, Red)

Apple iMac G3 (Tray Loading, Red)

The iMac G3 was the first model of the iMac line of personal computers made by Apple Inc. (formerly Apple Computer, Inc.). The iMac G3 is an all-in-one, luggable personal computer, encompassing both the monitor and the CPU in a single enclosure. Originally released in striking bondi blue and later a range of brightly colored, translucent plastic, casings shipped with a keyboard and mouse in matching tints.

The company announced the iMac on 6th May 1998 and started shipping on 15th August 1998. The launch of the iMac was a landmark event for its time, and had a massive impact on both the company and the computer industry.
 
Our Model:Red Imac Power PC G3
Power PC G3 233 MHz
512k cache/32MB
4GB Hard Drive
24X CD drive -tray loading
Rage Pro 6MB SGRAM

 
SGI Indigo 2 xZ

SGI Indigo 2 xZ

These SGI Indigo 2 xZ is based on the same "Express Graphics" architecture from the original SGI Indigo 2, but feature improved performance.

Released in January 1993, the Indigo 2, codenamed "Fullhouse", was the successor to SGI's Indigo workstation.  The Indigo 2 was marketed as a high-end workstation, with many configurations totaling well over $100,000 (USD), and thus was placed above the “budget” SGI Indy workstation released several months later. Like any other SGI workstation, the Indigo 2 was mostly used in academic and commercial settings, with very little value or use to the personal computer market. 

Classifying specific specifications is made difficult by the highly customizable nature of SGI’s workstations.  This issue become even more convoluted by the 1995 release of the Indigo 2 Impact. Like the Indy, the Indigo 2 and Indigo 2 Impact belong to the group of colourful and iconic “pizza box” workstations meant to fit underneath a monitor. Both versions are easily differentiated by the colour of their case with the base Indigo 2 teal and the Indigo 2 Impact purple.  There is also an additional rare POWER Indigo 2 version which featured a R8000 processor in a teal case.

Manufacturer  Silicon Graphics Incorporated

Dimensions  47 cm × 47 cm × 12.7 cm
Introduced  January 1993
Discontinued  June 1998

Operating System  IRIX 6.2 IRIX 6.5.22

Processor  R4000, R4400, R4600, R8000, or R10000
Frequency  100 MHz, 133 MHz, 150 MHz, 175 MHz, 200 MHz, 250 MHz
Memory  16 - Upgradeable to  a maximum configuration: 384 MB  via 12 * 32 MB SIMMs

Graphics  Newport Graphics (XL), Express Graphics (XZ), Ultra Graphics (Extreme),or Impact Graphics

Connectors:

Multimedia:
5 stereo 1/8" phone jacks, for headphone, microphone, speakers, etc.
Networking:
15 pin AUI network connector
RJ45 10BaseT network connector
Input/Output:
2 Mini-DIN 6 pin PS/2 compatible mouse and keyboard ports
2 Mini-DIN 8 pin Mac compatible serial ports (RS422 - 38.4 Baud)
50 pin SCSI-2 connector
DB25 female bidirectional parallel po

Workstation Owner’s Guides

Indigo 2

http://www.sgistuff.net/hardware/systems/documents/007-9096-050-indigo2.pdf

Indigo 2 Impact

http://www.sgistuff.net/hardware/systems/documents/007-2849-004-indigo2impact.pdf

 
Hitachi CDR-1503S - CD-ROM Drive System

Hitachi CDR-1503S - CD-ROM Drive System

Single Speed SCSI External CD-ROM Drive.

 
Philips CDD 521 - Compact Disc Recorder

Philips CDD 521 - Compact Disc Recorder

The Philips CDD 521 Compact Disc Recorder can write to disk at 300 Ko/sec or at 150 Ko/sec. The device is supplied with preformatting software for Windows or Macintosh.

 
A3K2 Drive Bridge

A3K2 Drive Bridge

The A3K2 is a styled housing providing the means for adding up to 2 additional floppy drives (2 x 3.5' or 1 x 5.25'), and a Winchester hard disc drive. All these can be added without having separate boxes hanging from the computer on ribbon cables. A3K3 is supplied with a high spec power supply with all the necessary sockets for peripherals.

 
Zenith Z 207-41 - 8

Zenith Z 207-41 - 8" Disk Drive

8" Disk Drive for the Zenith Z-100 PC Computer.

 
Zenith Z-100

Zenith Z-100

The Zenith Data Systems Z-100 was a pre-assembled version of the Heathkit H100 electronic kit. Configured as a family (Z-120 was an all in one model, with self-contained monitor), the Z-110 (called the low profile model) was similar in size to the cabinet of an IBM PC, XT, or AT, but a bit shorter, and configured with a raised cabinet molding on the top surface within which one placed one's display monitor, designed to keep it from sliding off to either side or back. Both models had a built in keyboard that was tactilely and in appearance modeled on an IBM Selectric typewriter, the premier office machine of the day.

Dual processors: 8085 and 8088. Available with CP/M and Z-DOS (non-IBM compatible MS-DOS variant). Five S-100 expansion slots. Two 320 KB 40-track double-sided 5.25-inch floppy disk drives. Socket enabled direct plug-in of external 8-inch floppies. 2× serial ports (2661 UART), one Centronics printer port (discrete TTL chips), light pen port. 640×225 bitmap display. 8 colors (low-profile model), or monochrome upgradable to 8 greyscales (all-in-one). Base 128 KB RAM, expandable to 192 KB on board, to 768 KB with S-100 cards. (Video RAM was paged into the 64 KB block above 768 KB). The Z-100 was a "near-compatible" system to the IBM PC, using standard floppy drives. It ran a non-IBM version of MS-DOS, so "generic MS-DOS" programs would run; but most commercial PC software used IBM BIOS extensions and would fail.[3] Several companies offered software or hardware solutions to permit unmodified PC programs to work on the Z-100. The Z-100 had unusually good graphics for its era,[3] superior to the contemporary CGA (640×200 monochrome bitmap or 320×200 4-color), IBM Monochrome Display Adapter (MDA) (80×25 text-only), and arguably even the Hercules Graphics Card (720×348 monochrome). Early versions of AutoCAD were released for the Z-100 because of these advanced graphics.[4] Aftermarket vendors also released modifications to upgrade mainboard memory and permit installation of an Intel 8087 math coprocessor.

Model: ZW 111-30

 
Millipede Electronics - Prisma 3

Millipede Electronics - Prisma 3

The Millipede Prisma 3 Graphics system was almost the ultimate TV graphics add on for use, originally with the BBC B and later, for A300 / A400 / Risc PC series computers running RISC OS 3. The system is an 8 bit RGB 768 pixel x 574 lines interlaced display which is fully broadcast genlockable. It is supplied as an external mains powered system box, with a podule control card connected by 50 way ribbon cable. The system had a 64 bit internal graphics bus for high speed graphics processing and a Hitachi HD63484P98 9.8MHz Advanced CRFT controller. It has 6 MB RAM which could be used to provide up to 14 frames worth of animation.

This unit was bought by CHris Whytehead from Paul Middleton of Uniqueway who said that the system was one of a number used to provide graphics for the 1992 General Election coverage on BBC Wales / S4C.

Kindly donated by Chris Whytehead.

 

 

 
Steve Furber 'Computer Group' Prototype

Steve Furber 'Computer Group' Prototype

This computer was built by Steve Furber during his time in the Cambridge Computer Group. It's architecture formed the base of the early Acorn Proton designs.

 
Amstrad PCW 8512

Amstrad PCW 8512

The PCW 8512 was identical to the Amstrad PCW 8256 but with double the RAM: 512KB instead of 256KB.

 
Commodore D9090 Hard Drive

Commodore D9090 Hard Drive

This external hard drive connects to any Commodore PET and provides 9.6MB of storage space (unformatted). Along with the D9060, this was the only hard drive Commodore ever made for the home/business markets.

In 1983 the D9090 retailed for 6100 GBP.

 
RISC PC Pizza Oven

RISC PC Pizza Oven

The 'pizza oven' was a promotional item produced by Acorn for use at trade shows. It was part of the Acorn Rocketship - a massively upgraded RISC PC that featured 10 'slices' included extra hard drives, docking stations, multimedia upgrades, and even a kitchen sink.

It did not actually cook pizzas - the interior was illuminated with red lamps to simulate the effect.

 
NEC APC-H20

NEC APC-H20

Connecting cable for the NEC APC advanced personal computer.

 
QuickShot QS-209E Skyhawk

QuickShot QS-209E Skyhawk

Gaming joystick manufactured by QuickShot for the PC. Features:

  • Ergonomic design
  • Compatible with IBM PC, XT, AT, 286,386,486, and P5
  • Auto-centering operating mode
  • Two positive response fire buttons
  • X/Y axis adjustment
  • 6-foot cable with 15-pin game port connector
  • Four stabilizing suction cups

 
Stack Light Rifle (CBM)

Stack Light Rifle (CBM)

"The Stack Light Rifle is one of a range of accessories and software for Atari, BBC, VIC-20, Commodore 64, Spectrum, and other popular home computers."

 
DFI MG-150 Video Card

DFI MG-150 Video Card

The MG-150 is an 8-bit ISA expansion board for the IBM PC. It provides text video output compatible with the IBM 5151 monochrome monitor, as well as monochrome graphics output compatible with the Hercules video card. it was also capable of an extended 132-character monochrome text mode, which caused it to become a popular option for PC users who needed to interact with mainframe terminal emulators.

The card uses the Tseng Labs ET1000-A video chip to fit these video features plus a parallel port on a short-length ISA card.

 
Atom Colour Issue 3

Atom Colour Issue 3

This expansion board for the Acorn Atom adds colour video support.

Issue 3, PCB 202,006.

 
IBM 3476 InfoWindow

IBM 3476 InfoWindow

The InfoWindow series 3476 is a 14-inch, flat screen, smudge-resistant, monochrome monitor that attaches to the IBM System/36, IBM System/38 and IBM AS/400 processors. The IBM 3476 14-inch monitor has an actual viewable screen size of 11.4 inches when measured diagonally. The IBM 3476 attaches remotely to these processors via the appropriate IBM 5294, 5394, 5494 and compatible remote control units.

 
Epcot Electronics - Apple II Clone

Epcot Electronics - Apple II Clone

Apple II clone. Main board has a label on it saying Epcot Electronics - Made in Japan.

Power supply unit has APS-3 as a part number.

 
Steve Furber '2650' Protoype

Steve Furber '2650' Protoype

This computer was built by Steve Furber during his membership of the Cambridge Computer Club. It is based around a Signetics 2650 microprocessor.

 

 
Olivetti D33

Olivetti D33

Olivetti laptop in carry case.

 
Sinclair Black Watch Circuit Board

Sinclair Black Watch Circuit Board

This is the circuit board from a Sinclair Black Watch.  Sinclair products were known for their cheap build quality in order to keep costs down.  This philosophy of squeezing as much as possible from components can be seen on this circuit board.

 
ICL OPD Colour Monitor

ICL OPD Colour Monitor

This colour monitor was an alternative to the 12" monochrome monitor supplied with the ICL One-Per-Desk computer.

 

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