Latest Additions

Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

Sinclair Sovereign

Sinclair Sovereign

The Sovereign was one of the last calculators to be released by Sinclair before the company refocused on the personal computer market. It was released in 1976 and can display eight digits in its red LED display. It features the usual four arithmetic functions plus square, square root, percentage, and memory. Because the case was made of pressed steel instead of plastic it was available in a variety of styles, including black painted, chrome plated, silver plated, and gold plated.

 
Sinclair Executive Memory

Sinclair Executive Memory

The Sinclair Executive Memory is a four-function calculator introduced by Sinclair Radionics in 1973. It uses eight red LED digit displays and is powered by four button cell batteries. The low power consumption required to run off such a small power source was obtained by pulsing the power supply to the electronics.

 
Datel Electronics Syncro Express

Datel Electronics Syncro Express

Syncro Express is a high speed floppy disk backup system for the Atari ST. Data is transferred directly from source to target using the Syncro Express Interface, producing a single sided copy in less than 23 seconds and double sided in under 44 seconds. Note that a secondfloppy disk drive is required.

 
GN Telematic 4501 Tape Reader/Punch Station

GN Telematic 4501 Tape Reader/Punch Station

The GNT 4601 is a combination paper tape reader/punch device. It handles serial data at speeds of up to 1200 baud, and all data and control signals conform to RS232C/V24 and RS423. There is also a current loop facility and a parallel input for the punch.

The GNT 4601 is intended for word processing systems and version A incorporates facilities for conversion between ASCII and Telex code.

The GNT 4601 has two signal connectors and can be inserted between a computer and a terminal. The Reader/Punch combo can also be used as a terminal itself. Tapes can be duplicated.

 
VEL Beeb-Lock BL.2K

VEL Beeb-Lock BL.2K

This external genlock device from Video Electronics Ltd performs two functions:

  1. The Beeb-Lock unit synchronises the RGB output from a BBC Micro to a composite colour video signal from a camera, studio, videodisk player, etc. and encodes the three separate RGB waveforms in a standard PAL format.
  2. The BL.2K mix/key board allows the PAL encoded output from the Beeb-Lock to be mixed with the input video signal in a variety of way without the use of any other vision mixing equipment. Alternatively a Beeb-Lock system with the BL.2K board can be used as a 'downstream keyer' to add captions and graphics over the output from an existing studio mixer.

Item consists of:

  • VEL Beeb-lock 2K unit with BL.2K mix/key board installed.
  • VEL BPU1 power supply.
  • Genlock interface cable, type two.
  • Application note BL2K.001: Beeb-Lock downstream mix/key extension board type BL2K.
  • Application note BL2K.002: Connecting the BL.2K downstream mix/key board to video systems.
  • Application note BL2K.003: BL2K downstream mix/key board operating notes.
  • Installation details for VEL Beeb-Lock interface to BBC Micro (issue 2).

 
Casio fx-310

Casio fx-310

The Casio fx-310 is a scientific calculator with 8 digits precision and algebraic logic. It has 54 functions, 39 keys and one of the early LCD (liquid crystal) displays which incorporated a yellow filter. The power source is 2x1.5V cell. The calculator was manufactured in Japan.

 
AVIE 4MB Upgrade for the A310

AVIE 4MB Upgrade for the A310

This expansion board by AVIE exapnds the Archimedes A310's memory to 4MB. The smaller board plugs into the memory controller's socket and provides updated memory decoding for the extra RAM. The larger board plugs into the OS ROM sockets and holds the original ROMs as well as the extra memory chips.

 
Dacom 2123AD Autodialling Modem

Dacom 2123AD Autodialling Modem

Auto dialling modem by Dacom Systems Ltd.

 
VineGen 2

VineGen 2

By linking the VineGen between your computer and your VGA monitor, and connecting a 12v power supply, a video signal can be taken to a television or video - for display or video recording. By feeding a video signal (from a camcorder or VCR) into one of the inputs, you can then overlay titles and graphics, and re-record the results.

'PC to video' features:

  • VGA/SVGA/XGA (24-bit compatible) input.
  • Converts imag eto Composite, S-Video, and RGB (computer image).
  • infra-red remote control of all functions.
  • Adjustable overscan/underscan settings.
  • Freeze facility; two-level flicker reduction control.
  • Horizontal and vertical picture size and positioning adjustments.
  • All functions can be computer-controlled from Windows or DOS.
  • Colour sub-carrier locked to line frequency, thus reducing 'dot-crawl'.

'Overlay' features:

  • Composite video and S-Video inputs.
  • 32-level luma-key allows overlay of titles of any colour (except black).
  • Fader allows titles and graphics to be faded to black, or to the video background.
  • 32-level of fade speed, from 0.5s to 4s (approx).
  • Two keying methods provided: hard keying and soft keying.

 
Anderson Jacobson A211 Acoustic Coupler

Anderson Jacobson A211 Acoustic Coupler

Anderson Jacobson was primarily a manufacturer of acoustic coupler modems, but also manufactured printing terminals designed to replace teletypes. Anderson Jacobson began early in 1967 as a manufacturer of one of the first acoustic data couplers. By 1973, the company had acoustic coupler products that transmitted at 150, 300, 450 and 1200 baud. The 1200 baud acoustic coupler believed to be the only one of it's kind in 1973An acoustic coupler is an interface device for coupling electrical signals by acoustical means — usually into and out of a telephone instrument.

The link is achieved through converting electric signals from the phone line to sound and reconvert sound to electric signals needed for the end terminal, such as a teletypewriter, and back, rather than through direct electrical connection.

It is designed for acoustically coupling a telephone to a data terminal for the purpose of transmitting or receiving messages, where the telephone handset is placed on a bracket mounted directly on the chassis of the terminal. Isolation of transmitting and receiving acoustic links is provided by a pair of resilient cups, one for each link. The inside contour of each cup is adapted to provide a supporting annular ledge for one end of the telephone and an airtight seal over the transducer thereof. An annular recess below the ledge is formed to receive and tightly hold a flange of a receiving or transmitting transducer. Each cup is mounted on the bracket by a resilient flange. The flange is connected to the cup by a sleeve which is turned in at the top to form an inverted auxiliary cup with the base of the main cup protruding through the bottom of the auxiliary cup. In that manner, virtually complete acoustic isolation is provided by the cup from the surrounding air and bracket.

Our coupler has a serial number of 30783 and was kindly donated by William (Bob) H Williams

 
Atari External Floppy Disk Drive

Atari External Floppy Disk Drive

 This third-party external floppy disk drive connects to the Atari ST via a 14-pin DIN connector.

 
Cherlyn Electronics Microscale

Cherlyn Electronics Microscale

An electronic scale, developed by Cherlyn Electronics Ltd. 15-pin D-sub connector (possibly PC game port?).

 
Apple Adjustable keyboard

Apple Adjustable keyboard

This keyboard connects to an Apple personal computer over an ADB connector. It can be raised or lowered with spring-loaded feet and the keyboard halves can be rotated up to 45 degrees to allow more comfortable typing.

Family number: M1242

 
Shugart SA-400 Floppy Disk Drive

Shugart SA-400 Floppy Disk Drive

This full-height 5.25" floppy disk drive by Shugart Associates can read and write 35-track single-sided double-density disks capable of storing up to 110KB (unformatted - formatted capacity was generally around 87.5KB).

 
Trident 1MB SVGA Card

Trident 1MB SVGA Card

A video expansion card for the PC 16-bit ISA bus. 1MB video RAM onboard, with VGA feature connector. Originally retailed for £69.95.

 
DJ Hero 2

DJ Hero 2

The follow-up to the award-winning, #1 new videogame IP of 2009, DJ Hero 2 delivers the ultimate way for gamers to come together with a host of new multiplayer modes that pit DJ against DJ in unique Battle Mixes, invite vocalists into the spotlight with scoring based on pitch and range detection and bring the party to life with jump-in/jump-out Party Play gameplay.  Featuring the biggest dance, pop and hip-hop hits by the hottest artists everyone knows and loves remixed by world-class DJ's in an all-new way, the game's soundtrack delivers over 70 unique mashups only available in DJ Hero 2.  Further immersing players into the music,  the game offers a heightened level of creative input and allows everyone to add their own touch, directly impacting the beats they're spinning with Freestyle scratching, cross-fading and sampling, performed at set points in the mix.

 
Flytech PC Expansion Card 1.0

Flytech PC Expansion Card 1.0

This 8-bit ISA expansion card by Flytech makes the ISA bus pins available on both an extender port (at the top of the card) and also on two internal IDC connectors.

Part number: FT-870728

 
AMS 30L Deluxe Disk Case

AMS 30L Deluxe Disk Case

This plastic case is designed to allow the user to store up to 30 3-inch floppy disks.

 
Ferranti 1600B Semiconductor Memory Module

Ferranti 1600B Semiconductor Memory Module

This D1115M memory module was designed for use in the Ferranti FM1600B computer system. It uses semi-conductor chips to provide 6,384 words of 26 bits each. This unit was upgraded from the previous model which used the much slower and physically larger core storage.

 
Acorn Prestel Adapter Production Field Test Unit

Acorn Prestel Adapter Production Field Test Unit

This Acorn Teletext/Prestel adaptor is a Production Field Test unit. It appears to be identical to the publicly-available ANE02 adapter, but lacks model or serial numbers.

 
Compaq AlphaServer DS20

Compaq AlphaServer DS20

The Compaq AlphaServer DS20 server is an ideal Web hosting platform. It features many options required by today's intranets, including dual processor capabilities, internal secondary storage with a RAID controller option for external arrays, and integrated management augmented by the integrated remote management console.

Today's intranets support a broad scope of communication and collaboration applications far beyond simple e-mail and Web-based publishing, and also provide an infrastructure for general-purpose application development. Forward-thinking enterprises recognize the value of linking their intranets with those of trading, joint-venture, and supply chain partners and customers.

With support for applications such as AltaVista Search, firewall and tunnel products, and Netscape SuiteSpot, the Compaq AlphaServer DS20 server provides the perfect foundation for a comprehenisve intranet infrastructure. It ties together internal resources to access data quickly, enables the management and sharing of that data outside corporate wall, and connects remote satellite offices, customers, and suppliers.

 
Commodore Super Expander with 3K RAM Cartridge

Commodore Super Expander with 3K RAM Cartridge

This cartridge provides 3KB of RAM and additional features for the Commodore VIC-20.

 
Q 16K RAM Switchable Cartridge for Commodore VIC-20

Q 16K RAM Switchable Cartridge for Commodore VIC-20

This cartridge provides 16KB of RAM and is suitable for use with the Commodore VIC-20.

 
ZX81 Keyboard Upgrade - 2

ZX81 Keyboard Upgrade - 2

This model has been fitted with a 3rd party upgrade to the keyboard. It is a large, plastic device that is stuck over the original keyboard to make the buttons larger and easier to hit.

 
Amino Freedom J5001

Amino Freedom J5001

The Amino Freedom is a set-top box designed to display streaming and on-demand video over IPTV. Unlike previous models, the J5001 does not feature any analogue inputs - all video is streamed over the ethernet network or through the HDMI input. An optional input for an IR blaster is present, allowing the set-top box to be hidden in normal use.

 
Amino Freedom

Amino Freedom

The Amino Freedom is a Linux-based set-top box priduced by Amino Communications. This particular model features dual RF-inputs, ethernet, component and composite video output, as well as HDMI and SP/DIF connectors. it also has a Common Interface slot for a CAM (Conditional Access Module) - this would have been used to enable access to subscription or pay-per-view services.

 
Amino AmiNET 103

Amino AmiNET 103

The Amino AmiNET 103 is a miniature MPEG-2 set-top box for IPTV and video-on-demand applications. It is based on the Linux operating system and can be remotely managed and upgraded (with the appropriate server software).

  • Outputs: Composite Video, Stereo Audio. Standard definition PAL or NTSC.
  • Graphics Resolution: 640x438 (525-line) or 640x512 (625-line), 16 bit RGB colour, 8-bit Alpha blending
  • Codecs: MPEG1 & MPEG2 MP@ML, up to 10Mbps
  • Smart Card Interface: ISO-7816
  • Size: 100 x 34 x 93 mm
  • Construction: One-piece Aluminium Extrusion
  • Power: 5V, 400mA
  • Operating Environment: ETS 300-019-1-3 Class 3.1
  • EMC Conformance: EN55022. FCC Part 15.
  • Safety Approvals: Safety certification to EN60950, and ELSVD. CE, CB and CSA Safety approval

 
Sun JavaStation-1

Sun JavaStation-1

Produced by Sun Microsystems in 1996, the JavaStation-1 was a Network Computer (NC) intended to run only Java applications.

The hardware is based on the design of the Sun SPARCstation series of UNIX workstations. As a Network Computer, the JavaStation lacks a hard drive, floppy or CD-ROM drive. It also differs from other Sun systems in having PS/2 keyboard and mouse interfaces and a VGA monitor connector.

The JavaStation-1 (part number JJ-xx), codenamed Mr. Coffee was the first production model and was based on a 110 MHz MicroSPARC IIe CPU. The computer was housed in a cuboidal Sun "unidisk" enclosure.

The JavaStation range of computers would ultimately be superceded by the SunRay thin-client system.

 
BCL Susie Paper Tape Reader

BCL Susie Paper Tape Reader

This paper tape reader and panel were used in a BCL Susie electronic computer.

 
RM Nimbus PC

RM Nimbus PC

The Nimbus PC was introduced by Research Machines for use in the education market. It sold with 192KB RAM, a single 720 KB floppy drive, and extended sound and graphics. It could be expanded to 1 MB of RAM, dual floppy drives, and up to a 160MB hard disk. The Nimbus was also designed as a network station and came with built-in Piconet and ethernet ports.

The Nimbus ran a modified version of Microsoft MS-DOS 3.10 that would not run on a standard PC. Although an IBM emulator software allowed some standard PC programs to run, only software specifically written for the Nimbus was able to take advantage of the improved sound and graphic features. However, RM and third-parties released numerous languages and educational software that fulfilled most school needs.

 
Polo System 1

Polo System 1

This 'all-in-one' computer system was released by PoloMicrosystems in 1984. It was marketed as a machine that contained everything you needed to run a small office - including items that other computer manufacturers would sell seperately such as monitors, disk drives, a printer, and software.

It featured two microprocessors: an Intel 80188 to run DOS and PC-compatible software; and a Zilog Z80 to allow it to run CP/M software.

It also included a modem to allow it to dial-up to online services. One notable feature was the button on the upper-right of the keyboard. This placed it into a low-power 'sleep' mode from which it would wake periodically to dial-up to the user's mail service. If any unread messages were found, the Polo would return to sleep mode with a flashing LED to alert the user to their new mail.

Specifications:

  • 128KB RAM; internally expandable to 512K; externally expandable to 1MB.
  • CPU: 80188; Z80
  • Storage: two double-sided, double-density disk drives (360K capacity)
  • Keyboard: 90 keys, all software redefinable. 12 function keys; 12 key numeric pad. Includes one mouse port and two device input ports.
  • Monitor: 12-inch RBG colour CRT. 640x200 pixels in 16 colours. Tilt/swivel base.
  • Printer: 120 cps dot-matrix.
  • Communications: Bell 103 modem; auto-answer/auto-dial.
  • Expansion ports: Two RS-232 serial ports; two RJ11 phone jacks; two RAM/ROM cartridge ports; one system port.

 
Apple Lisa A6BB101 Parallel interface

Apple Lisa A6BB101 Parallel interface

This expansion board for the Apple Lisa adds two parallel ports to allow it to be connected to a printer.

 
Commodore 4040 Dual Floppy Drive

Commodore 4040 Dual Floppy Drive

The Commodore 4040 is the replacement for the previous models 2040 (USA) and 3040 (Europe). It's a dual-drive 5¼" floppy disk subsystem for Commodore International computers. It uses a wide-case form, and uses the parallel version of the IEEE-488 interface common to Commodore PET/CBM computers.

 
Stack Storeboard

Stack Storeboard

This expansion card for the Commodore VIC-20 allows you to add multiple RAM chips to expand a Commodore computer's storage. It also offers one external socket for a user-supplied EPROM (here populated by the VIKKIT 1 programming Aids PROM).

 
DEC VR297 Monitor

DEC VR297 Monitor

A 17" CRT monitor for DEC products. Has the typical workstation 13W3 video connector and uses a Trinitronshadow grille. Capable of displaying images at 1024x864@60Hz.

 
Apricot Mouse

Apricot Mouse

Apricot mouse/trackball. Uses an infra-red link to the main computer unit, although a short plastic lightpipe is included for those who want to place the mouse next to the computer instead of in front of it.

 
Apricot FM00009T Monitor

Apricot FM00009T Monitor

A small Apricot-branded monitor for the Apricot range of computers.

 
Apricot CM00010S Monitor

Apricot CM00010S Monitor

An Apricot-branded CRT monitor for the Apricot range of computers. White, 10" display.

 
Apricot F2

Apricot F2

The Apricot F2 was a business machine marketed by Apricot in 1985. It was similar in specification to the F10 but shipped with two floppy drives instead of a floppy/hard drive combination.

Compared to its' predecessor, the F1, it included an extra expansion slot, more memory and larger storage capacity. Like the F1, the F2 and F10 had an infra-red interface for the keyboard and the mouse/trackball (the same infra-red mouseball pointing device used with the Apricot Portable).

The F2 and the F10 use an Apricot-modified version of MS-DOS, so they were not 100% IBM compatible. They were provided with a nice graphical and iconized interface called Activity. Integrated were a desktop, and software including a wordprocessor, communication, painting and Basic. They were also sold with GEM Write, GEM Paint and the GEM desktop.

 
Commodore PET 2001-32

Commodore PET 2001-32

The PET has a special place in the history of micro-computers, as it was one of the biggest sellers in the 1979 / 1980 period, when computers were aimed at both the home and business market. Many people instantly recognise the PET as it stood out from the usual ' terminal plus box' computer.

This was the first PET model, launched in 1977. It was a popular machine and found many admirers, from educational use, hobbyists, and some business users. The first machines only had 4K of RAM, mine has 8K, but even this was very limiting so several third-party memory expansion boards were available to take the memory up to 32K. It has a built in system ROM (6K) and BASIC (8K), and with additional memory could run 6502 assemblers and even compilers The screen could display upper and lower case letters, and an attractive range of graphics symbols. These features encouraged a large library of software to be written.

The 2001 model was found to be slow in updating its display, until someone discovered a way of speeding up the graphics routines with a POKE to memory. This was fine, but on later machines the graphics hardware was improved and the same POKE caused the screen to go blank and was know as 'the killer POKE'.

Some of the chips used on the motherboard:

Main RAM 16 x MOS MPS 6550 (8K)
Main ROM 7 x MOS MPS 6540 (14K)
Video RAM 2 x MOS MPS 6550 (1K)

 
Crayola EZ Type Keyboard

Crayola EZ Type Keyboard

This Crayola-branded USB keyboard has oversized keys and a modified layout to make it easier for children to type on the computer.

 
Commodore Music Maker keyboard

Commodore Music Maker keyboard

This Commodore accessory attaches over the Commodore 64's keyboard and allows you to play music using the included Music Maker software. Includes software, manual, keyboard stickers, and songbook.

 
InterLynx 3278

InterLynx 3278

The InterLynx 3278 from Local Data allows any asynchronous printer to be connected to an IBM mainframe host. it provides 3287/3289 emulation and translation and can be configured from the serial port or front panel. Settings are stored in non-volatile EEPROM.

 
CTR-80A TRS-80 Computer Cassette Recorder

CTR-80A TRS-80 Computer Cassette Recorder

Designed for use with the TRS-80 microcomputer. Auto-stop and auto-level. Digital counter.

 
TRS-80 Microcomputer System Model III

TRS-80 Microcomputer System Model III

TRS-80 Microcomputer System Model III

The Model III is basically an upgrade of the Model I, which was released three years earlier. It has the same CPU, but it is faster, has more memory, and the floppy drives hold twice as much data, although the Model I could be upgraded to some of these features.

The major reason for developing the Model III was because the FCC had just instituted new regulations about RF emissions generated by computers and other electronic devices. The Model I was completely unshielded and was unable to pass the emission restrictions.

The Model III system is entirely self-contained. The original Model I had edge-type connectors with ribbon cable connecting the keyboard to the (optional) Expansion Interface, as well as the floppy drives. This type of connection is very unreliable, and led to the occasional system crash or lock-up.

Introduced July 1980

The improvements of the Model III included built-in lower case, a better keyboard, and a faster (2.03 MHz) Z-80 processor.

 
Apple Macintosh SE/30 (Douglas Adams)

Apple Macintosh SE/30 (Douglas Adams)

This Macintosh SE/30 was once owned by Douglas Adams.

 
Sharp MZ-721

Sharp MZ-721

The MZ-700 was launched in Japan in October 1982, but did not appear in the U.K. until October 1983. lt was the first Sharp home Computer with colour, but it came without a built-in display unit; instead, sockets were provided for a colour TV or an RGB Monitor; or a B/W TV set or a Mono Monitor. lt also had a built-in printer I/F with a switch which allowed you to run the MZ-1P01 4-pen plotter-printer or a more standard MZ-80P5( K ) dot-matrix printer.

Thus, with its clock speed of 3.5MHz, the MZ-700 seemed to meet many of the criticisms levelled at the MZ-80A when it was launched in June 1982. But it was still only a halfway-house - the printer I/F only suited Sharp printers, the screen was only 40 columns, and to run disk drives you needed an extra interface of some kind.

The MZ-700 was reviewed in the PCW Magazine in February 1984. By then most of the competing machines had high-res graphics, and the reviewer was hard on the MZ-700 over that. But he was impressed by the alternative languages available, and concluded that the MZ-700 was ‘worthy of serious consideration‘. The prices below come from this review; significantly, there is no mention of disk drives:

MZ-700 £250
Colour Plotter / Printer  £135
Data Recorder £50
P5 Printer £350

All these are INC VAT; in the same Magazine: BBC Model B £350, Commodore 64 £240

 

Model Numbers :

 

  • MZ 711 was the basic model without any peripherals
  • MZ 721 has an integrated tape recorder
  • MZ 731 has built-in plotter and tape recorder

 

 
Olivetti M290

Olivetti M290

The Olivetti M290 was a personal computer based around the Intel 80286 processor. Unlike standard IBM machines, it was designed around a largely passive backplane. The majority of what the modern user would consider 'the computer' was based on an add-on expansion card. This 'processor card' held the CPU, main memory, optional maths co-processor, and keyboard interface. Other expansion cards handled external connectivity such as video, serial, and parallel I/O. The standard M290 shipped with a video card and monitor compatible with the IBM EGA standard. Various storage options were available, ranging from one 5.25" floppy drive, to dual floppy drives plus a 40MB hard disk unit.

This machine was owned and used by Chris Turner who was Chief Engineer at Acorn Computers Ltd.

 
Burroughs C 3660

Burroughs C 3660

Electronic calculator by Burroughs. Nixie tube display.

 
Burroughs C 7203 Calculator

Burroughs C 7203 Calculator

The C 7203 is one of the last calculators produced by Burroughs. It was introduced around 1973 and is a print-only calculator with programming facilities including loop, branch and subroutines. It had 16 data memory locations, and could store up to 204 program steps. The slot on the right is a magnetic card unit that could read and write programs and data. It does not have scientific notation for numbers, nor any further inbuilt mathematical functions beyond square root.

 
Commotion Buggy Kit

Commotion Buggy Kit

The Commotion Buggy Kit is a low-cost general-purpose robotic buggy. It runs on 3-6 volts and can be controlled either manually or by a computer.

 
UltraSound MIDI Adaptor

UltraSound MIDI Adaptor

The Gravis ultraSound MIDI Adaptor connects to any PC sound card which has a standard 15-pin D-sub connector and that uses the standard MIDI UART (MPU-401 'dumb' mode).

Features:

  • Standard 5-pin DIN MIDI connectors for MIDI IN, OUT, and THRU.
  • MIDI activity indicator LEDs for MIDI IN and OUT.
  • Two 15-pin joystick connectors (joystick A and B); functions as a joystick 'Y' connector/extension cable.
  • Four foot cable for easy access to connections.
  • Bonus six foot MIDI cable.

 
Power Replay

Power Replay

This third-party accessory for the Sony Playstation allows you to enter cheat codes to unlock infinite lives, unlimited energy, and hidden levels. Includes a connector allowing it to be attached to a PC.

 
Sega Dreamcast Controller

Sega Dreamcast Controller

Official Sega Dreamcast controller, boxed.

Model MK 55100-50.

 
DEC RQDX3 M7555 Controller Module

DEC RQDX3 M7555 Controller Module

Qbus disk controller for a DEV PDP-11 or MicroVax system.

 
GlowGuard

GlowGuard

This GameBoy accessory plugs into the expansion connector and uses an LED to illuminate the screen.

 
DEC M7957 SG-2 I/O Communication Card

DEC M7957 SG-2 I/O Communication Card

Believed to be a serial expansion option for a DEC minicomputer.

 
Advantage Six A9home

Advantage Six A9home

The A9home is a small-form-factor desktop computer that runs RISC OS Adjust32. It first announced at the 2005 Wakefield Show, and following the withdrawl of the Iyonix RISC PC was the only hardware to be manufactured specifically for the RISC OS marketplace.

Measuring 168x103x53mm in size, it runs on a 400 MHz Samsung ARM9 processor. It has 128MB SDRAM main memory and 8MB video RAM. The internal hard disk has a capacity of 40GB. The front panel features two USB 1.1 ports, and microphone and a headphone sockets. On the rear, it has two USB 1.1 ports, two PS/2 ports, a 10/100 BaseT network port, an RS-232 serial port, and a power connection socket. Like the Mac mini, it is powered by an external PSU (5V, 20W). The front panel also features a power/reset switch, a status/health indicator, and a drive activity indicator LED. The A9home is not designed to be internally expanded.

The A9home can use a program called Aemulor to emulate older 26-bit applications. This was originally developed for Castle's Iyonix PC.

 
Sony Data Discman - DD-10EX

Sony Data Discman - DD-10EX

The Sony Data Discman was an electronic book player launched by Sony Corporation in 1990.

It was marketed in the United States towards college students and international travelers, but had little success outside of Japan. The Data Discman's purpose was for a quick access to electronic reference information on a pre-recorded disc. Searches for information were entered through a QWERTY-style keyboard and the "Yes" and "No" keys. A typical Data Discman model had a low resolution small grayscale LCD, CD drive unit, and a low-power computer. Early versions of the device were incapable of playing audio CD discs. Software was prerecorded and usually feature encyclopedias, foreign language dictionaries, novels, and the like.

 
The Mill

The Mill

This expansion card for the Apple II was developed by Stellation Two. it contains a 6809 microprocessor which can execute code concurrently with the Apple II's 6502 processor. The card is supplied with the OS9 operating system, the BASIC09  language, and full documentation.

 

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