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Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

Xerox 820-II Drive Controller Card

Xerox 820-II Drive Controller Card

This expansion card shipped inside the Xerox 820-II as standard. It provided support for external data storage drives, which can be dual 5 1/4-inch floppy drives, dual 8-inch floppy drives, or the 20Kg 8-inch floppy and rigid drive combination unit. Drives were supported in several combinations and could be daisy-chained with the secondary connection on the drive unit rear. The default drive assignments were A-D for floppy drives and E-H for hard-disc partitions.

 
Xerox 820 16/8 Personal Computer

Xerox 820 16/8 Personal Computer

The Xerox 8/16 was the successor to the Xerox 820 series. It has two CPUs: an 8-bit Z80 for running CP/M and an 8086 for MS DOS or CP/M-86. The power supply, display, and disc system weere shared between the two processors which were otherwise independent. This computer was one of the first desktop computers to feature concurrent processing : a task could be started on one operating system and, with a special keyboard command, the user could switch to the other processor to perfom another. Both processors could work at full speed as they shared no RAM or system resources. Only the input/output devices were locked to the user's active processor.

Our Xerox 8/16 is pictured here with the 8-inch floppy drive and hard drive unit.

 
Sega Mega Stick

Sega Mega Stick

Manufactured by ASCII Corporation, the Mega Stick is a three-button joystick for the Sega Mega Drive. It was released in Europe as an official SEGA product. In America and Japan it was a third-party peripheral marketed under the names "Power Clutch SG" and "Cluster Stick", respectively.

The Mega Stick an eight-direction joystick, variable speed autofire f or the A, B, and C triggers, and a 'slow-motion' toggle. As with all such peripherals, this was implemented as an auto-fire for the start button. The slow-motion was dependent on the game interpreting this as the player rapidly pausing and unpausing the game.

 
Acorn A500 ARM3 CPU with FPA11

Acorn A500 ARM3 CPU with FPA11

The 33MHz Archimedes A500 ARM3 CPU with FPA11 floating point accelerator installed.

 
Kempston BBC Pro Joystick

Kempston BBC Pro Joystick

Kempston Micro Electronics Ltd distributed this rebranded version of the Competition Pro 5000 joystick. Besides the colours, which were matched to the BBC Micro's cream and brown, the joystick's interface was changed to work with the BBC's user port (the BBC did not natively support the Atari-style 9-pin interface used by many other computers of the time).

 
Busicomputers Prophet 2

Busicomputers Prophet 2

The Prophet 2 is a modified Atom build by Acorn for Busicomputers Ltd.

Our Prophet 2 is part of the Chris Whytehead collection. More information on this item is available here.

 
ATM Motion Picture

ATM Motion Picture

This 16-bit ISA expansion card allows you to capture pictures from any PAL video source.

Features:

  • Real-time live viewfinder
  • Still & AVI movie capture
  • Fast 16-bit ISA hardware
  • 256K/512K on-board video VRAM
  • Still size 800x520 pixels
  • Movie size 384x258 pixels
  • Still colours 16.7 million (24-bit)
  • Movie colours 256 greyscale (8-bit)
  • Windows 95 and Windows 3.1 ready

Technical:

  • Input PAL 1V peak-to-peak
  • File formats: BMP, GIF, TIF, RVF, AVI
  • Rendering: WinG
  • Process: DSP colour decoding

 
Cumana 68008 Issue 1 Second Processor

Cumana 68008 Issue 1 Second Processor

A 68008 second processor board for the BBC Micro. The issue 1 "Mentor" version. Part of the Chris Whytehead collection; further details available at his site.

 
Cumana 68008 Issue A Pre-Production Second Processor

Cumana 68008 Issue A Pre-Production Second Processor

A 68008 second processor board for the BBC Micro. Believed to be a pre-production board. Part of the Chris Whytehead collection; further details available at his site.

 
Philips Nino 200 Series

Philips Nino 200 Series

The Philips Nino was a Palm-size PC, a predecessor to the Pocket PC platform. It was a PDA-style device with a stylus-operated touch screen. The Nino 200 and Nino 300 models had a monochrome screen while the Nino 500 had a color display. The Nino featured a Voice Control Software and Tegic T9.

 
Apple Powerbook Duo 230

Apple Powerbook Duo 230

The PowerBook Duo 230 was a portable notebook personal computer, manufactured by Apple Computer and introduced in October 1992. Priced at $2610, the PowerBook Duo 230 was the high end model of the two simultaneously released PowerBook Duos. The other one, the PowerBook Duo 210, was priced at $2,250. The PowerBook Duo 230 had a 120MB SCSI Hard Disk Drive. It was discontinued on July 27, 1994.

 
Addonic Electronics Light Pen

Addonic Electronics Light Pen

A light pen for the BBC Micro. Comes with software programme on cassette.

 
Dell Axim X51

Dell Axim X51

Released in September 2005, the Dell Axim X51 replaced the X50. It shipped with Windows Mobile 5 instead of Windows Mobile 2003 Second Edition.

The low-end X51 has an Intel XScale processor running at 416 MHz, 128MB flash ROM, and had retained for $299. The mid-range model increased the CPU speed to 520 MHz. The high-end X51v had a VGA screen, a 624 MHz processor, 256MB flash ROM, and had a list price of $379.

 
Fujitsu Point 510

Fujitsu Point 510

Released in the 1990s, the Point 510 from Fujitsu Personal Systems, Inc. was a low-cost Windows 95-compatible pen tablet computer with a 10.4" SVGA DSTN display. Along with a 100 MHz processor and integrated communications features, the Point 510 was intended to be used for mobile decision support applications. The Point 510 features a pressure-sensitive resistive digitizer which allows temporary use with a fingernail or other pointing object if the pen is misplaced or lost. The Point 510 features 8 MB of high-performance EDO RAM memory. Maximum memory capacity is 56 MB through two DIMM slots. The Point 510 uses an internal 2.5" hard disk with a 1.6 GB capacity.

 
Apple Powerbook 3400c/200

Apple Powerbook 3400c/200

The PowerBook 3400c was a laptop computer in the PowerBook line manufactured by Apple Computer from February to November 1997. It was, briefly, the swiftest laptop in the world. Using the PowerPC 603e processor running at speeds of up to 240MHz, this PowerBook was the first to feature a PCI architecture, EDO memory, and a 64-bit wide, 40MHz internal bus. It was also the first PowerBook to feature a PC card slot capable of being used as a zoomed video port. Like all Apple laptops since the PowerBook 500 series, it featured a built-in trackpad as the pointing device.

 
IBM ThinkPad 365XD

IBM ThinkPad 365XD

  • Intel Pentium 120 or 133 CPU
  • Trident Cyber9320 video controller with 1MB
  • 8MB memory standard
  • 1 x 144 pin SODIMM expansion slot
  • 810 or 1080MB HDD
  • ES1688 Audio controller
  • CD-ROM drive
  • IrDA 1.0
  • (2) Type II, or (1) Type III PCMCIA slot

 
Epson RAM Disk Unit 120

Epson RAM Disk Unit 120

This external RAM disk is designed to be used with the Epson PX-8 computer.

 
Alcatel 'Stingray' ADSL Modem

Alcatel 'Stingray' ADSL Modem

One of the first ADSL modems to be released in the UK by BT.

  • Hardware platform:
    • LAN interface: USB
    • WAN interface: ADSL line (RJ11)
    • 180mm x 130mm x 40mm
    • Powered directly by the PC
  • Line specification:
    • Up to 8Mbps downstream
    • Up to 800Kbps upstream
    • ADSL standards compliant: ITU G. DMT, ITU G. LITE, ANSI T1.413-1998, ITU AUTOMODE
  • Protocol support:
    • Bridging (RFC 1483)
    • PPP over ATM (RFC 2364)
    • Support for PPPoE (RFC 2516)

 
IBM POWERportable N40

IBM POWERportable N40

The Model N40 was PowerPC-based notebook developed and manufactured by Tadpole Technology for IBM. It was powered by a 50MHz PowerPC 601. It had between 16 and 64MB RAM. Our N40 runs AIX.

 
Microwriter MW4

Microwriter MW4

The Microwriter is a hand-held portable word-processor with a chording keyboard. It was sold in the early 1980s by Microwriter Ltd, of London, UK. Microwriter was invented by UK-based, US-born film director Cy Endfield.

The 23 cm x 12 cm x 5 cm device comprises:

  • A six-button chording keyboard.
  • A single line LCD display.
  • An 8 bit microprocessor.
  • Complete Word processing software in ROM.
  • 16 kilobytes of RAM.
  • Rechargeable Nickel-cadmium batteries - sufficient to run the device for 30 hours.
  • Various interfaces (see below).

This device is capable of allowing the user to enter and edit several pages of text - and by connecting a printer to the RS-232 serial port connector, documents can be printed without the aid of a separate computer.

The keyboard uses one button for each finger and two for the thumb of the user's right hand. The five buttons immediately beneath the fingers are pressed in different combinations to generate all letters.[2] The second thumb button is used to toggle through a range of modes that allow the user to switch case, enter numbers, insert punctuation and even add ASCII control characters, to be used in editing the document being prepared. To type a letter "T", for example, the user would tap the top thumb button to shift to uppercase, then chord a "t" by pressing the index finger and ring finger buttons simultaneously.

The manufacturers claimed that most people could learn to use it in just a couple of hours. With some practice, it is possible to become a faster typist with the Microwriter than with a conventional keyboard, providing that what is being entered is just text. Typing is slowed if a substantial number of special characters have to be entered using the "shifting" mechanism.

Learning the chords for the basic letters and numbers is facilitated by a set of flash-cards that show simple mnemonics for each character.

Despite a lack of similar products, the Microwriter was not a success, and ceased production in 1985. It is likely that the concept of a chording keyboard put off many potential customers.

 
Ferguson Model 3T27 Cassette Recorder

Ferguson Model 3T27 Cassette Recorder

  • Computer compatible
  • Mains or battery operation
  • Tape counter
  • Pause control
  • Auto stop
  • Auto level control

 
Phonemark PM-4401C Cassette Recorder

Phonemark PM-4401C Cassette Recorder

This third-party cassette recorder is designed to be used with the Commodore VIC20 and VIC64 home computers.

 
Burrough C-3350 Calculator

Burrough C-3350 Calculator

This calculator was designed in 1967 but sold into the early 1970's. Most of the logic is constructed from discrete transistors and resistor-diose gates, but some small-scale integration silicon IC's are also used. Despite the name on the case, the design and manufacture was actaully carried out by Sharp Corporation. Two memory registers are provided based on magnetic core memory. They therefore retain their values when power is turned off.

 
QuickShot II Deluxe Joystick Controller

QuickShot II Deluxe Joystick Controller

For use with:

  • Atari video game system
  • Sears video arcade
  • Atari 400/800 computers
  • Commodore VIC-20
  • Commodore C64
  • NEC DC-6001 computer
  • SVI-318/328 computers

 
Atari SF354 Disk Drive

Atari SF354 Disk Drive

This external disk drive was designed to work with the Atari ST. It uses single-sided media.

 
Atari SF314 Disk Drive

Atari SF314 Disk Drive

This external disk drive was designed to work with the Atari ST. It uses double-sided media.

 
Adder EPROM Programmer

Adder EPROM Programmer

This EPROM programmer connects to the BBC Micro user port.

 
Burroughs C2316 Calculator

Burroughs C2316 Calculator

This mains-powered electronic calculator has two memories and outputs results directly to a paper spool. The printer is of the impact drum type.

 
Burroughs C5306 Calculator

Burroughs C5306 Calculator

This electronic calculator dates from 1974. It is mains-powered and has large, red, LED digits with dual memories.

 
ANF01 Monochrome Monitor

ANF01 Monochrome Monitor

This green-screen monitor has composite inputs and was designed for use with the BBC Micro. In it's original box.

 
ALPS Desktop Glidepoint

ALPS Desktop Glidepoint

  • Replaces mouse or trackball
  • Three programmable buttons
  • "Taps" for instant selection
  • Large touchpad for comfort and accuracy
  • DOS, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95 compatible
  • Adjustable base for convenience and control

 
SJ Research Econet Bridge

SJ Research Econet Bridge

This Econet bridge module is powered by a 6502 processor.

The three buttons and LCD display on the front of the box provide status updates and allow the user to modify the configuration. The Run/Admin keyswitch for allows the configuration menu to be disabled.

The two network connections (A and B) can be run with different clock rates, allowing slower 6502 equipment such as BBC Micros to be on one network and faster RISC OS machiness one the other network. The clock intervals can be set down to the quarter microsecond.

 
National Micro Centres Hi-Fi Adapter

National Micro Centres Hi-Fi Adapter

This small unit is designed to be hooked in between the BBC Micro's sound output and the external connector. It filters the output to make it suitable for use with hi-fi inputs.

 
Om Remote Control

Om Remote Control

Designed by Meridian Audio Ltd. Serial number MSR102090.

 
Linnet Intelligent V21/V23 Modem

Linnet Intelligent V21/V23 Modem

Serial number C011394-135

 
INMOS B008 Transputer Evaluation Board

INMOS B008 Transputer Evaluation Board

This INMOS B008 PC Board was designed to plug into a standard IBM-compatible PC and allow it to control up to ten Transputer Modules ("TRAMs"). While different motherboards were developed for different host systems, the TRAMs were universal modules, each hosting a Transputer processor and up to four megabytes of RAM. Multiple B008 cards could be installed in a single PC, each chained together and controlled by a single 'master' board. Each TRAM could also act as a master controller for a separate subsystem of Transputer modules. All Transputer processors require a standard 5MHz external clock - high-frequency clocks are internally derived from this. The B008 Transputer processors internally run at 20MHz.

The motherboard contained an IMST212A processor and an IMSC004B processor to handle comunications between the TRAMs and the PC interface.

The IMST212A is a 16-bit processor containing 2KB on-chip RAM; up to 64KB external RAM is supported. It incorporates a pre-emptive microcoded scheduler, enabling any number of concurrent processes to be executed without a software kernel. Two hardware timers are available with 1-microsecond and 64-microsecond precision, respectively. Four identical bi-directional serial links are the 212's interface to the outside world. Each link has input and output channels, with TTL compatible signals at a standard 10Mbit/sec.

The IMS C004 is a transparent programmable link switch designed to provide a full crossbar switch between 32 link inputs and 32 link outputs. The IMS C004 will switch links running at either the standard speed of 10 Mbits/sec or at the higher speed of 20 Mbit/sec. It introduces, on average, only a 1.75 bit time delay on the signal.

This B008 motherboard is fully populated with four double-width TRAMs and two single-width. The TRAMs are:

  • Four IMSB404 modules with IMST800 processors and 2MB RAM. 4KB is internal to the Transputer (1 cycle access time), 32KB is SRAM (3 cycles), and the remainder is DRAM (4-5 cycles).
  • Two unknown single-with modules with IMST424A processors, possibly 1MB RAM.

 
Tadpole SPARCbook 2

Tadpole SPARCbook 2

The SPARCbook 2 was a portable SPARC system produced by Tadpole Technologies in the early 1990's. Retailing for $10,950 the standard configuration shipped with 16MB RAM, a 250MB hard disk, and a 640x480 colour TFT active-matrix LCD display. No floppy drive was included as standard, although external SCSI floppy drives were available.

 
Acorn DeskLite Prototype

Acorn DeskLite Prototype

This pre-production thin client was designed to support Citrix Systems WinFrame and MetaFrame. Based on the ARM7500FE, this reference design was intended to be licensed to other manufacturers. The DeskLite was one of the last products launched by Acorn.

Our DeskLite has serial number 009 and is part of the Chris Whytehead collection. Further details, including images of the internals, are available on the Chris Whytehead site.

 
Miracle Systems Gold Card 3

Miracle Systems Gold Card 3

The Gold Card was the first Miracle Systems board to replace the QL's 68008 processor. With 2MB RAM and a 16MHz 68000 processor, it could roughly quadruple a QL's performance.

1920K of the memory is directly available to the QL; the remainder is used for display memory and shadowing the QL and Gold Card's ROMs.

The Gold Card has a disk drive interface connector capable of supporting up to three disk drives. Double Density (720K), High Density (1.4MB) and Enhanced Density drives were supported, and the connector was backwards-compatible with the older Miracle Systems Trump Card.

The Gold Card has a battery backed clock, whose time and date are copied to the QL's inbuilt clock at startup.

Supplied on the built-in ROMs were the Toolkit 2 and level 2 directory drivers for floppy discs and RAM discs.

The Gold Card attaches to the QL via the standard interface slot.

 
Solidisk Two Meg/128 Upgrade Board

Solidisk Two Meg/128 Upgrade Board

This expansion board for the BBC Micro plugs into the 6502 socket and provides four ROM sockets plus shadow RAM.

 
QL Ace Card 256K RAM Expansion

QL Ace Card 256K RAM Expansion

When the Ace Card 256K is plugged into a Sinclair QL an extra 256K RAM is added to the QL's own memory to give 384K RAM total. The Ace CArd was also marketted under the name "Trump Card".

 
ZX interface 1

ZX interface 1

A peripheral from Sinclair Research for its ZX Spectrum home computer, the ZX Interface 1 was launched in 1983. Originally intended as a local area networkinterface for use in school classrooms, it was revised before launch to also act as the controller for up to eight ZX Microdrive high-speed tape-loop cartridge drives. It also included a DE-9 RS-232 interface capable of operating at up to 19.2 kbit/s — a rare instance of Sinclair using an industry-standard connector. At hardware level it was mainly a voltage adapter, the serial protocol being implemented in software bybit-banging. This led to problems when receiving data, but not when transmitting.

A wedge-shaped device fitting underneath the ZX Spectrum, ZX Interface 1 contained 8 kB of ROM comprising the control software for the Microdrives, RS-232 port and network interface. This extended the error handler in the Sinclair BASIC to allow extra keywords to be used. As this became an official standard, other developers quickly used this mechanism to create language extensions to Sinclair BASIC.

 
MOD Keyboard/Trackball

MOD Keyboard/Trackball

This keyboard was used by the Navy, possibly to control a radar system. It has an integrated trackball. The keycaps are similar to those used by the Sinclar QL.

 
IBM RS/6000 N40

IBM RS/6000 N40

The Model N40 was PowerPC-based notebook developed and manufactured by Tadpole Technology for IBM. It became available on 25 March 1994, priced at US$12,000. It was powered by a 50MHz PowerPC 601. It had between 16 and 64MB RAM.

 
Kempston Pro Joystick Interface

Kempston Pro Joystick Interface

Kempston produced a number of joystick interfaces for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum to allow normal Atari-style DE-9 connector joysticks to be used with it. Apart from implementing existing joystick interfacing modes they produced their own standard which delivered the joystick state on the Z80 bus at port 31 (read in BASIC using IN 31). This meant that the joystick did not produce key-presses like the other standards and the method was soon borrowed by other interface manufacturers and became quite popular.

This model allows the connection of up to 3 seperate joysticks via 9 pin d plugs as well as a rom pack via the use of an adaptor. The one we have is complete in box.

 
Official Commodore Joystick

Official Commodore Joystick

An official joystick manufactured by Commodore for use with there various systems. No specific consoles are mentioned on the box. The stick has one button and an 8 way directional stick. It connects via 9 pin plug simaler to that of the Atari 2600 and Sega Master System.

 
Sinclair ZX81 with keyboard upgrade

Sinclair ZX81 with keyboard upgrade

The ZX81 is a home computer produced by Sinclair Research and manufactured in Scotland by Timex Corporation. It was launched in the United Kingdom in March 1981 as the successor to Sinclair's ZX80 and was designed to be a low-cost introduction to home computing for the general public. It was hugely successful and more than 1.5 million units were sold before it was eventually discontinued. The ZX81 found commercial success in many other countries, notably the United States, where it was initially sold as the ZX-81. Timex manufactured and distributed it under licence and enjoyed a substantial but brief boom in sales. Timex later produced its own versions of the ZX81 for the US market – the Timex Sinclair 1000 and Timex Sinclair 1500. Unauthorised clones of the ZX81 were produced in a number of countries.

This model has been fitted with a 3rd party upgrade to the keyboard. It is a large, plastic device that is glued over the original keyboard to make the buttons larger and easier to hit.

 
Tadpole SPARCbook 3GX

Tadpole SPARCbook 3GX

The Tadpole SPARCbook 3GX has a 4G removeable hard disk, an ethernet port, built in 14.4 Fax/modem and built in ISDN, Fast SCSI-II, and 16 bit stereo in/out. It also has a 10.4" TFT display with a 2M Framebuffer with 800x600 resolution.

With carry case and power supply.

 
Cumana 5.25

Cumana 5.25" Disk Drive

Double sided, 80-track 5.25" floppy disk drives. Manufactured by Cumana. Drive and original box kindly donated by Chris Whytehead.

 
Sony Vaio PCG-FX109K

Sony Vaio PCG-FX109K

The Sony Vaio PCG FX109K was a laptop aimed at the small business market. Shipped with an 850MHz Intel Pentium III processor and 128MB RAM (expandable to 512MB). It also had a CD-RW / DVD-ROM combination drive.

The AGP graphics processor supported resolutions up to 1400x1050, with VGA or composite outputs. Ethernet and V.90 modem included.

The FX109K originally retailed at £2,250 (plus VAT). Ours is in it's original box with manuals.

 
CD drive, probably Amiga

CD drive, probably Amiga

A black, metal CD drive, probably for Amiga. The manufacturer is unknown. The drive door bears the compact disk and photo CD logos.

 
3.5

3.5" Amiga Floppy drive

A white, plastic floppy disk drive for Amiga. The manufacturer is unknown. The unit has the serial number of PC880B.

 
Squirrel SCSI interface

Squirrel SCSI interface

The Squirrel SCSI is an SCSI host adaptor that plus into the PCMCIA card slot. It is compatible with the Amiga A600 and A1200.

 
Amiga Capture Card

Amiga Capture Card

An Amiga capture card of an unknown maker. It has a parallel port input and output and a CVBS input and output. It is in a white painted metal case and has the serial number 0593047.

 
G-lock Genlock and Sound Mixer

G-lock Genlock and Sound Mixer

The G-lock was a device for the Commodore Amiga that allowed genlock and sound mixing. It was released in 1992.

 
Spaceball 3003

Spaceball 3003

Released by Spacetec in 1995, a serial device with two programmable buttons.

 
Spaceball 2003

Spaceball 2003

Released by by Spacetec IMC Ltd in 1991, and later rebranded for IBM and HP. It presents itself as a serial device with 8 programmable buttons and a hardware zeroing button (button 8). There is also a button integrated into the forward face of the ball.

The 2003 draws more power than the serial port can provide, so has a custom cable which allows for an external power supply.

 
Newtronic Master Videon

Newtronic Master Videon

The master videon was an accesory that could be connected to an amiga pc to capture framegrabs and sound samples.

 
Lo-Profile Professional Keyboard

Lo-Profile Professional Keyboard

This third-party keyboard is designed to replace the standard one on a ZX Spectrum.

 
Commodore C386SX-LT

Commodore C386SX-LT

The Commodore C386SX-LT is a laptop computer system with external power supply, disk drive, TFT screen and a motherboard. The C386SX-LT is a IBM compatible PC from Commodore.

 

 
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