Latest Additions

Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

Minor Miracles Modem WS2000

Minor Miracles Modem WS2000

Multi speed, multi standard modem for use with Prestel, Micronet, Telecom Gold as well as many public databases. 

 
Commodore 64 Dust Cover

Commodore 64 Dust Cover

A black PVC Commodore 64 dust cover with the Commodore User magazine logo printed off-center on its right side. Commodore User released its first issue in 1983 and was published monthly before changing its title to CU Amiga in 1990.

 
The Micro User Dust Cover

The Micro User Dust Cover

A grey PVC dust cover for the BBC Micro with 'The Micro User' printed in the bottom right corner. The Micro User was a magazine catering to owners of the BBC Micro, Acorn Electron and Archimedes computers from 1983-1992.

 
Micro Peripherals QL Floppy Disc interface

Micro Peripherals QL Floppy Disc interface

A QL floppy disc interface manufactured by Micro Peripherals.

Advertised features included:

  • Facilities and performance superior to any other system
  • Signal buffering between QL + Controller assures complete data integrity
  • ROM based utilities
  • Supports up to 4 drives in double density mode
  • Uses 40 or 80 track drives, single or double sides, 3", 3.5" or 5.25" format
  • High compatibility with microdrives
  • Easily connects into QL expansion socket

 
Sony Playstation Disc Wipes

Sony Playstation Disc Wipes

Official Playstation disc wipes, two individually wrapped wet disc wipes used to clean fingerprints etc inside a protective card sleeve.


 
Beebug Archimedes Serial Link

Beebug Archimedes Serial Link

A serial link cable for transfering files between Acorn Archimedes and the BBC Micro or Master Series computers. Our version is unopened and includes a software disk and printed instruction manual.


 
Expansion Board Kit

Expansion Board Kit

An electronics project kit designed to be used with Mike Cooks Body Building column in the BBC Micro User magazine. Ours is in kit form and unassembled, although a prebuilt version could also be ordered. It is designed to be used with experiements detailed in the October 1988 issue onwards.

The kit includes.
Printed circuit board
Loudspeaker
Motor
Relays
LED bar display

 
Tadpole Circuit Boards

Tadpole Circuit Boards

Selection of circuit boards including some development boards relating to Tadpole products. Mostly dated 1994 - 1995.

 
Videoshow Professional

Videoshow Professional

This machine allowed the user to have a portable answer to creating 2000x500 slideshows, images and presentations, when there were very few graphics packages on the market, let alone the computers powerful enough to equal the videoshow.

It runs off a N8OL 286 Chip, backing up a 320C25 DSP Chip.

.

 
i-cubed EtherLan 600

i-cubed EtherLan 600

The iEtherLan600 is a Network Interface card for the Risc PC and A7000 which fits in the Network slot. i3 produced 3 versions of the card: The E600 which only supports 10Base2, the E601 which only supports 10BaseT and the E602 combo card which supports both 10Base2 and 10BaseT. The first card (above) is an E601 which only supports 10baseT (RJ45), the second card is an E602 and supports both 10Base2 (BNC) and 10BaseT (RJ45). The card autosenses which interface is active when it is initialised. The EtherLan600 uses the EtherH driver which is in the card's ROM.

The Installation Instructions, User Guide and Fault Finding Guide are HERE .

I3 produced a utility program to scan the podule slots for EtherLan cards and report on their status. The i3 cardtype program is available HERE .

 
Atomwide A5000 4MB RAM Upgrade

Atomwide A5000 4MB RAM Upgrade

A 4MB RAM upgrade for the A5000. 

 
HCCS A5000 2MB RAM Upgrade

HCCS A5000 2MB RAM Upgrade

A 2MB RAM upgrade for the A5000. 

 
Atari 1040STFM

Atari 1040STFM

The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was released by Atari Corporation in 1985 and commercially available from that summer into the early 1990s. The "ST" officially stands for "Sixteen/Thirty-two", which referred to the Motorola 68000's 16-bit external bus and 32-bit internals.

The Atari ST was part of the 16/32 bit generation of home computers, based on the Motorola 68000 CPU, with 512 KB of RAM or more, and 3½" double-sided double-density floppy disks as storage (nominally 720 KB). It was similar to other contemporary machines which used the Motorola 68000, the Apple Macintosh and the Commodore Amiga. Although the Macintosh was the first widely available computer with a graphical user interface (GUI), it was limited to a monochromatic display on a smaller built-in monitor. Preceding the Amiga's commercial release by almost two months, the Atari ST was the first computer to come with a fully bit-mapped color GUI, using a version of Digital Research's GEM released that February.[5] It was also the first home computer with integrated MIDI support.

Atari later upgraded in 1989 the basic design in 1986 with the 1040STF (also written STF). The machine was generally similar to the earlier 520ST, but moved the power supply and a double-sided floppy drive into the rear of the housing of the computer, as opposed to being external. This added to the size of the machine, but reduced cable clutter in the back. The 1040 shipped with 1 MB of RAM, and the same design was also used for the new 512 KB 520STFM, which replaced the earlier models in the market. The early 'STF' machines lacked the 'M' modulator that allowed a TV to be used and would only work with a monitor.

The 1040ST was the first personal computer shipped with a base RAM configuration of 1 MB, and when the list price was reduced to $999 in the U.S. it became the first computer to break the $1000/megabyte price barrier, and was featured on the cover of BYTE. However, the ST remained generally the same internally over the majority of its several-year lifespan. The choice of model numbers was inherited from the model numbers of the XE series of the Atari 8-bit family of computers. A limited number of 1040STFs shipped with a single-sided floppy drive.

Our 1040St was kindly donated by Alan Hunter

 
Acorn BBC Micro 5.25

Acorn BBC Micro 5.25" Disk Drive

This is a 40 track single sided, 100k disk drive, manufactured for Acorn Computers and compatible with the BBC Micro

 
Sega Cartridge Soft Pak Travel Case

Sega Cartridge Soft Pak Travel Case

A nylon carry case for Sega Mega Drive or Master System cartridges. The case is black with blue trimming and Sega logo on the right hand side of the lid, it holds up to 8 boxed cartridges. There is a handle along one edge and a velcro strip to keep the lid closed. 

 
Atari 2600 Dust Cover

Atari 2600 Dust Cover

A dark blue cloth dust cover for the Atari 2600

 
ORIC VIA Expansion Card

ORIC VIA Expansion Card

An expansion card for the ORIC-1. This home brew card adds two 8-bit expansion ports, little else is known about it. 

 
Texas Instruments TM 990 / U89

Texas Instruments TM 990 / U89

This may look like a calculator - the keyboard is from a TI-59 calculator - but it's a training system for the TMS 9980A processor. The board has 1K of RAM and 4K of ROM, plus the ability to save and load code from tape.


This board is co-branded Radio Spares.

 
MicroProfessor MPF-1/88

MicroProfessor MPF-1/88

Another training system from Multitech (now Acer), similar to the Z80 based MPF-1. This system is based on the 8088, has a real keyboard and a two line by 20 character LCD display.


It has a 4.77MHz 8088, 8k of RAM and 16K of ROM containing a monitor, assembler and disassembler.

 
Compaq LTE 5280

Compaq LTE 5280

The Compaq LTE was a line of laptop computers made by Compaq, introduced in 1989. The first models, the Compaq LTE and the Compaq LTE 286, were among the first computers to be close to the size of a paper notebook, spurring the use of the term "notebook" to describe a smaller laptop. They were also among the first to include both built-in hard disk and floppy disk drives, offering performance comparable to then-current desktop machines.

The 5280 dates from 1995, and was still in use in 2016 by Mclaren Automotives for servicing the Mclaren F1 Supercar.

 
Micro-Professor MPF-IP

Micro-Professor MPF-IP

The Micro-Professor MPF-1 was a microcomputer designed to teach the fundamentals of machine code and assembly language. It was contained within a plastic case that could be placed on a bookshelf like any other training manual or book. It was manufactured by Multitech, known since 1987 as Acer. The item is still being sold as of 2018 by Flite Electronics Interntational, a former international distributor for Acer who purchased the copyright for the device in 1993.

Advert text:

"Here in one attractive package is a Z80 based microcomputer to lead you step by step to a thorough knowledge of the world of microprocessors. The Micro-Professor is a complete hardware and software system whose extensive teaching manual gives you detailed schematics and examples of program code. A superb learning tool for students, hobbyist and microprocessor enthusiasts, as wel as an excellent teaching aid for instructors of electrical engineering and computer science courses. But the Micro-Professor is much more than a teaching device. With it you can do bread-boarding and prototyping, designing your own custom hardware and software application with Z80, 8080 and 8085 compatible code. The standard 2K bytes of RAM is expandable to 4K, and the standard 2K bytes of ROM can be increased to 8K. All this plus a built-in speaker, a cassette interface, and sockets to accept optional CTC/PIO. Bus is extendable. As well as being an exciting learning tool, the Micro-Professor is a great low-cost board for OEM's. MPF-Basic software is included in the ROM."

Hardware Specifications

CPU: Zilog Z-80 CPU with 158 instructions and 2.5 Mhz maximum clock rate. The MPF-I system clock is 1.79 Mhz.

ROM: Single +5V EPROM 2516 (2532), total 2K (4K) bytes. Monitor EPROM Address: 000-07FF (0FFF).

RAM: Static RAM: 6116, total 2K bytes. Basic RAM Address: 1800-1FFF.

Memory Expansion Area: Single +5V EPROM 2516/2716/2532/2732 EPROM or 6116 static RAM on-Board Expansion Address: 2000-2FFF.

I/O Port: Programmable I/O Port 8255, a total 24 parallel I/O lines are used for keyboard scanning and seven segment LED display control. I/O addresses: 00-03. Programmable PIO, a total of 16 parallel I/O lines, I/O address: 80-83H. Programmable CTC, a total of 4 independent counter timers channels, I/O address: 40-43H.

Display: 6-digit, 0.5", 7-Segment red LED display

Keyboard: 36 keys including 19 function keys, 16 hexadecimal keys and 1 user-defined key.

Speaker and Speaker Driver Circuits: A 2.25" - diameter speaker is provided for user's expansion.

Further information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro-Professor_MPF-I

 
BBC Interface DCP Bus Expansion

BBC Interface DCP Bus Expansion

This expansion unit connects to the BBC Micro/Master 1MHz user port. It provides eight analogue inputs, four output relays, four switch inputs, and a DCP bus expansion port. Additional Interpacks from DCP Micro-developments can be stacked providing more expansion opportunities.

 
Thin Wire Transceiver

Thin Wire Transceiver

Marked with "Computer Laboratory, UCNW, Bangor" - unsure if the lab made it, or if it simply belonged to the University.

 
Atomwide parallel SCSI Adaptor

Atomwide parallel SCSI Adaptor

The Atomwide parallel port SCSI adaptor allows the connection of a range of SCSI devices to the computer, including hard disc drives, CD-ROMs, removeable discs, without using an expansion slot. The adaptor plugs into the parallel port. This is especially useful on systems without any expansion slots (e.g. A4).


For more information see: http://chrisacorns.computinghistory.org.uk/32bit_UpgradesA2G/Atomwide_ParallelSCSI.html

 
Database Games Computer

Database Games Computer

By Videomaster, this is an early and running on an S2650 processor.


Distributed by Voltmace, who were more famed in the UK for producing joysticks and other peripherals for Acorn machines, this could be considered part of the Interton VC 4000 group of consoles, and although using different carts, hardware wise it would be compatible with Radofin and Prinztronic machines, there apparently was an adaptor to be able to use interton cartridges.

The game cartridges include Duck hunting, horse racing, car Racing and of course card games.

 
Apple Desktop Bus Mouse II

Apple Desktop Bus Mouse II

The Apple Desktop Bus Mouse II was the third major redesign in ten years. This was the first mouse to have rounded curves rather than the previous rectangular shape and straight-lines. The so-called tear-drop mouse, was essentially the same as its predecessor but with a new case subsequently held as the ideal shape of mice. Indeed, the basic design has persevered into current models, as well as being widely adopted by other mouse manufacturers.

It was included with all Macintosh desktop computers from 1993 until 1998. It was also the first mouse produced by Apple in black to match the Macintosh TV as well as the Performa 5420 sold in black.

This model is Family No. M2707 and is grey in colour.

 
Core Memory Panel

Core Memory Panel

This piece of memory has no known machine, if anyone has any idea where it is from, please let us know.

 
Sony PlayStation Memory Card

Sony PlayStation Memory Card

The Sony PlayStation memory card has 1MB of storage space split into 15 blocks used for saving game data. The card can also be accessed using the PlayStation memory card manager. 

 
Commodore SFD-1001 Disk Drive

Commodore SFD-1001 Disk Drive

The SFD-1001 disk drive was a floppy drive originally built in 1984. It used 5.25" double sided double density disks.It could connect to any 8-bit Commodore computer with a IEEE-488 port such as the Commodore PET series. Connection to other Commodore home computers such as the C64 or C128 was possible with an adapter. 

 
Apple Macintosh PowerBook 1400cs

Apple Macintosh PowerBook 1400cs

Revised version of the Powerbook 1400 series

 
VGA- Out PC Card - HP300 & 600

VGA- Out PC Card - HP300 & 600

Card to give VGA output to the HP300 and 600 Series machines

 
Atari Lynx

Atari Lynx

Originally named the Handy, and developed by Epyx, the machine eventually found itself in the hands of Atari.

Launching in late 1989, it was the worlds first colour handheld console, and proved to be very popular in Europe.
Although selling well below the Gameboy and Game Gear, the machine has an exceptionally good quality library of games such Chips Challenge, California Games and Roadblasters, a healthy homebrew scene kept the library expanding well into the 2000s.

The system is also notable for its forward-looking Features, advanced graphics, and ambidextrous layout.

The Lynx was eventually discontinued in 1992 by Atari, so they could concentrate on the ill fated Panther and Jaguar projects, a decision especially regretted by Atari's UK head Darryl Still.

The Atari Lynx had several innovative features including it being the first colour handheld, with a Backlit display, a switch able right-handed/left-handed (upside down) configuration, and the ability to network with up to 17 other units via its "ComLynx” system (though most games would network eight or fewer players).

ComLynx was originally developed to run over infrared links (Codenamed RedEye), This was changed to a cable-based networking system before the final release

The Lynx was the second handheld console from Atari to be produced; the first was Atari Inc.’s "Touch Me”; Atari Inc. had previously worked on several other handheld projects including the Breakout and Space Invaders, the Atari Cosmos portable/tabletop console, and the Atari Atlantis. However, those projects were shut down during development, some just short of their intended commercial release.

The first generations of cartridges were flat, and were designed to be stackable. However, this design was proved to be very difficult to remove from the console and were replaced by the second generation of cartridges called Tabbed or ridged, these used the same basic design but with to small tabs on the underside of the cartridge to aid the removal, The original flat style cartridges could be stacked on top of the newer cartridges, but the newer cartridges could not be easily stacked on each other, nor were they stored easily. Thus a third style, the "curved lip" style was produced.

The Atari Lynx needed six batteries, and the Game Boy needed four, with the Lynx’s backlight screen, its would drain six AA batteries in less than 3 hours, however as battery technology has progressed, the battery life with lithium batteries is now more than six hours.
This Lynx apparently was used in the development of the Chips Challenge conversion for the Spectrum and Amstrad.

 
Sup 'R' Mod. II

Sup 'R' Mod. II

The Sup 'R' Mod II is an RF modulator allowing a computer with a composite output to be connected to a TV. The modulator was plugged directly onto the Apple II motherboard and presented a colour signal on UHF channel 33. 

 
Radofin Tele-Sports

Radofin Tele-Sports

The Radofin Tele-Sports is an early Pong console. This version comes with 4 games, Squash (practice), Squash, Football and Tennis. The games are played with controller paddles although a light gun was also included and an additional two games could be played using it. 

This version is complete and includes the original box. 

 
Logitech WingMan Gamepad

Logitech WingMan Gamepad

A programmable gamepad for Windows computers. The included software allows the user to assign single commands or multi-command macros to any button or D-pad direction. 

Features. 
  • 8-way D-pad.
  • 9 easy to reach buttons. 
  • 2 fast action triggers. 
  • Built in 2 player connectivity. 

Compatible with Windows 95 or 98. 

 
BBC Micro Dust Cover

BBC Micro Dust Cover

A Beige hard plastic dust cover for the BBC Micro

 
Cumana Flat Dual Disk Drive Non Switchable

Cumana Flat Dual Disk Drive Non Switchable

Dual double sided, 80-track switchable 5.25" floppy disk drives. Manufactured by Cumana. Drive and original box kindly donated by Chris Whytehead.

This version does not have the Switch for 40/80

 
Vtech I.T. Unlimited

Vtech I.T. Unlimited

Vtech are one of the largest companies in the world for providing electronic early learning machines.

The IT Unlimited was a machine that was aimed at the older child age group 10-12 years.

Functionally it looks like a home micro, with a full travel keyboard, number pad, and the ability to connect to a TV via composite or RF.

Below the keyboard are two funtion buttons set either side of a cursor wheel.

Like many V-tech machines it takes educational cartridges in a side port, the cartridge with ours is a Science Fact program.

 
Samsung Q1 Ultra

Samsung Q1 Ultra

Part of the Samsung Q1 Ultra Series, running Windows XP, and quite markedly different from the other machines in the family.

This model sports a split keyboard, has dual cameras, a 40 or 60 GB hard disk, also has an SD card slot and 1GB of onboard memory, and a screen resolution of 1080x600.

The Q1 can boot into two different modes, a windows one, then another OS, just for viewing music, photos and films.


Serial Number : CJ7793BQ800060P

 
Prinztronic Tournament Colour Programmable 2000

Prinztronic Tournament Colour Programmable 2000

Prinztronic was the own-brand trade name of the British "Dixons" photographic and electronic goods stores. Under this brand were calculators and home computer games consoles.

It is said that it is called Radiofin outside of the UK

Prinztronic Tournament 2000 console with two controls and t.v connection.


 

 
Galaxy Invader 1000

Galaxy Invader 1000

One of the most recognisable electronic hand held games of its era, the game plays a very good version of Space Invaders, albeit with only three lines of aliens, it has excellent controls.

It has three skill levels via a switch, and a large fire button, and left right joystick.

Later there was a larger Galaxy 5000, which had 5 rows of aliens.

The machine was released in the UK by CGL, who also were responsible for bringing over the Sord series of computers.

 
SGI Silicon Graphics 3000 to 4000 Upgrade Kit

SGI Silicon Graphics 3000 to 4000 Upgrade Kit

This box includes a full upgrade package, including new motherboard, power supply, full documentation and original box.

 
Kasparov Chess Computer

Kasparov Chess Computer

Electronic chess board with magnetic pieces, that are recognised by the board, can play against players of all skill levels, and also has a learning function.

 
Joystick for Apple II

Joystick for Apple II

Unbranded joystick for the Apple II. Interestingly, exactly the same design as the controller for the Tele-games pong console.

 
CGRS Microtech Spacemaker II

CGRS Microtech Spacemaker II

ROM expansion board for the Commodore Pet.

 
Logitech Wingman Joystick

Logitech Wingman Joystick

Complete with throttle control and steel-weighted base. For DOS 5.0 and Windows 95/98

 
Pegasus Digital Data Recorder

Pegasus Digital Data Recorder

Not much is known about this digital tape recorder. There's a DB25 connector on the rear, so perhaps it uses RS232? If you know more, please tell us!

 
Microscribe - Keyboard Membrane

Microscribe - Keyboard Membrane

These Microscribe Main Printed Circuit Boards were kindly donated by Mike Voss
 

 
Microscribe - Keyboard Circuit Boards

Microscribe - Keyboard Circuit Boards

These Microscribe Main Printed Circuit Boards were kindly donated by Mike Voss
 

 
Microscribe - Link

Microscribe - Link

"Microscribe is a general-purpose, miniature terminal that's equally at home in the office, on site, at home — or on the move. It's stylish, compact and lightweight. Superb ergonomic design makes it very easy to use. And inside that neat exterior, there's a formidable array of powerful features.

Microscribe works just like any other terminal, with keyboard input and visual display output. The big difference is that where other terminals dominate the work surface, Microscribe is little larger than a textbook. It can even fit easily into a briefcase. Yet it is rugged enough to stand uptoeveryday use in industrial applications. It uses the industry standard RS232 serial interface protocol, so it can communicate with virtually any host computer or periphera either directly or via modems or acoustic couplers. A battery operated version using low-power CMOS technology is ideal for field or mobile use, acting as an electronic notebook or data capture device. For dedicated applications, where the terminal is permanently linked to and powered from a host computer there is a standard low cost NMOS version. An optional AC adapter provides power and can act as a charger for the battery versions.

Microscribe gives a single line display of 16, 32 or 40 alphanumeric characters with true descenders. Special control circuitry in the battery-powered models ensures that the contrast ratio of the display remains constant during the full discharge curve of the battery.

The keyboard is microprocessor controlled, and each key has full travel and tactile response, with selectable audio feedback. It is designed for years of trouble-free operation — the switch pads, for example, are made of pure gold. Setting up the terminal to suit a particular role is carried out interactively via the keyboard, and a range of preprogrammed function keys simplifies frequently-used operations.

Superb styling, careful ergonomics and innovative electronic design makes Microscribe the ideal terminal for today's industrial and commercial computer systems. Its size and power brings new dimensions to applications hitherto considered impractical for reasons of cost, environment or space."

Our usit was very kindly donated by Mike Voss

 
Microscribe - Dumb Terminal

Microscribe - Dumb Terminal

"Microscribe is a general-purpose, miniature terminal that's equally at home in the office, on site, at home — or on the move. It's stylish, compact and lightweight. Superb ergonomic design makes it very easy to use. And inside that neat exterior, there's a formidable array of powerful features.

Microscribe works just like any other terminal, with keyboard input and visual display output. The big difference is that where other terminals dominate the work surface, Microscribe is little larger than a textbook. It can even fit easily into a briefcase. Yet it is rugged enough to stand uptoeveryday use in industrial applications. It uses the industry standard RS232 serial interface protocol, so it can communicate with virtually any host computer or periphera either directly or via modems or acoustic couplers. A battery operated version using low-power CMOS technology is ideal for field or mobile use, acting as an electronic notebook or data capture device. For dedicated applications, where the terminal is permanently linked to and powered from a host computer there is a standard low cost NMOS version. An optional AC adapter provides power and can act as a charger for the battery versions.

Microscribe gives a single line display of 16, 32 or 40 alphanumeric characters with true descenders. Special control circuitry in the battery-powered models ensures that the contrast ratio of the display remains constant during the full discharge curve of the battery.

The keyboard is microprocessor controlled, and each key has full travel and tactile response, with selectable audio feedback. It is designed for years of trouble-free operation — the switch pads, for example, are made of pure gold. Setting up the terminal to suit a particular role is carried out interactively via the keyboard, and a range of preprogrammed function keys simplifies frequently-used operations.

Superb styling, careful ergonomics and innovative electronic design makes Microscribe the ideal terminal for today's industrial and commercial computer systems. Its size and power brings new dimensions to applications hitherto considered impractical for reasons of cost, environment or space."

Our usit was very kindly donated by Mike Voss

 
Touchwindow

Touchwindow

Touchwindow is a touch screen peripheral that attaches to a computer monitor and could be used as a replacement for a mouse. This version is for use with IBM & compatible computers. The Touchwindow was supplied with two soft stylus although a finger could be used as well.

 
Konix Speedking Joystick

Konix Speedking Joystick

An ergonomically designed microswitch joystick, this version had no autofire switch. Compatible with most 8-bit systems.

 
Konix Speedking Autofire Joystick

Konix Speedking Autofire Joystick

An ergonomically designed microswitch joystick with autofire switch. Compatible with most 8-bit systems.

 
Xbox 360 Final Fantasy XIII Special Edition

Xbox 360 Final Fantasy XIII Special Edition

Released the same day as Final Fantasy XII this Xbox 360 Special Edition came with two wireless controllers, a wireless headset and a copy of Final Fantasy XIII. Apart from the packaging the console was identical to the Xbox 360 Pro.

 
Tandy TV Scoreboard

Tandy TV Scoreboard

A Pong style games console produced by Tandy from 1976 until the early 1980's. It features 10 games with a total of 88 game variations. The console used two Pong style dial controllers. It also came with a light gun and an analogue throttle control.

The 10 games were.
Tennis
Football
Squash
Practice (Pelota)
Target
Motorcycle
Enduro
Motocross
Stunt Cycle
Drag Race

The console could be powered using an AC power adapter or 6 AA batteries.

 
Namco Light Gun Adapter Cable

Namco Light Gun Adapter Cable

A Playstation adapter cable for G-CON light guns. Produced by Namco.

 
Street Fighter II SNES Controller

Street Fighter II SNES Controller

A third party controller for the SNES. It has a variety of turbo/slow options and is specifically designed to be used with Street Fighter 2.

 
Competition PRO Controller

Competition PRO Controller

A third party controller for the SNES produced by Honey Bee. It has a variety of turbo/slow options.

 

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