Latest Additions

Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

Prototype 'Slogger' Electron Products

Prototype 'Slogger' Electron Products

Assorted prototype boards from Slogger Electron Products. Includes Pegasus 400 Disc Interface.

 
AIO Serial and Parallel Apple Interface

AIO Serial and Parallel Apple Interface

The AIO Serial and Parallel Apple Interface from SSM Microcomputer Products allows the user to connect an external parallel or serial driven device, like a terminal or printer, to the Apple II computer. The AIO uses two software controllable LSI (Large Scale Integration) chips for the parallel and serial interfaces to give the user maximum flexibility in configuring to system needs.

The included manual covers cable connections; serial and parallel setup; sample applications; use of included firmware and software; troubleshooting; and software listings and schematics.

 
BeebOPL Kit (Assembled)

BeebOPL Kit (Assembled)

The BeebOPL is a modern peripheral designed for the BBC Micro. It functions as an FM synthesizer using the Yamaha OPL chip. From the manual:

"This easy to assemble and install card transforms your computer into a powerful synthesiser which will faithfully reproduce the sound of a single instrument or an entire orchestra.

"In fact, it uses the same digital sound technology as the best electronic keyboard, so you hear rich, rumbling base, crystal clear highs, and true up-front mid-range. It also has up to 11 discrete channels for up to 11 different instruments and game sounds playing at once. You can listen to the sound straight from the speaker of your BBC Microcomputer and with the built-in pre-amplifier and output jack you can even listen to it on your home stereo."

Kit fully assembled with original manual, packing list, and schematic.

 
Philips CD-i Touchpad 22ER9017

Philips CD-i Touchpad 22ER9017

Joypad controller for "CDI-2**" series CD-i players. 12 foot (3.6m) cord.

 
HandyPort Wireless RS-232 Transceiver

HandyPort Wireless RS-232 Transceiver

This pair of wireless transceivers can connect two DE9 serial ports wirelessly.

Specifications:

  • 2.4GHz frequency hopping spread spectrum
  • D-sub 9P female connector
  • Maximum 20dBm (100mW) output power
  • Typical -80dBm receive sensitivity
  • 1.2 ~ 115.2 Kbps scalable baud rates
  • 2 LEDs for status indication (operation, link)
  • Reset button for factory setting recovery and user reconfiguration
  • SMA interface for external antenna (dipole or patch)
  • DC jack for external power feeding (+5V ~ 12V)
  • User reconfigurable locally and remotely; no extra software needed
  • CE certified (registration number G5M203060109-C)

 
Sega Saturn Arcade Racer

Sega Saturn Arcade Racer

This official racing controller for the Sega Saturn allows analogue control of racing games.

 
Micro Peripheral's 5.25

Micro Peripheral's 5.25" Disk Drive

5.25" floppy disk drive by Micro Peripherals Inc. Model 51SM; manufactured March 1983. Note the striped label on the bottom of the drive, used for calibrating the rotation rate with a strobe lamp.

 
Dacom Unity+ Gold

Dacom Unity+ Gold

8-bit ISA modem expansion by Dacom. Features:

  • V21/V22/V22bis/V23 PC Model
  • MNP5 error correction/data compression
  • Datatalk communications software

 
Acorn A540 ARM3 CPU with FPA10

Acorn A540 ARM3 CPU with FPA10

The 33MHz Archimedes A540 ARM3 CPU with FPA10 floating point accelerator installed.

 
Mark XIV Bomb Sight

Mark XIV Bomb Sight

The Mark XIV Computing Bomb Sight was a vector bombsight developed and used by Royal Air Force Bomber Command during the Second World War. The bombsight was also known as the Blackett sight after its primary inventor, P. M. S. Blackett. Production of a slightly modified version was also undertaken in the United States as the Sperry T-1, which was interchangeable with UK-built version.

Developed in 1939, the Mk. XIV started replacing the First World War-era Course Setting Bomb Sight in 1942. The Mk. XIV was essentially an automated version of the Course Setting sight, using a mechanical computer to update the sights in real-time as conditions changed. The Mk. XIV required only 10 seconds of straight flight before the drop, and could account for shallow climbs and dives as well. More importantly, the Mk. XIV sighting unit was much smaller than the Course Setting sight, which allowed it to be mounted on a gyro stabilization platform. This kept the sight pointed at the target even as the bomber manoeuvred, dramatically increasing its accuracy and ease of sighting.

The Mk. XIV was theoretically less accurate than the contemporary Norden bombsight but was smaller, easier to use, faster-acting and better suited to night bombing. It equipped the majority of the RAF bomber fleet; small numbers of Stabilized Automatic Bomb Sights and Sperry S-1s were used in specialist roles. A post-war upgrade, the T-4, also known by its rainbow code Blue Devil, connected directly to the navigation computer to automate the setting of windspeed and direction and further increase accuracy. These equipped the V Bomber force as well as other aircraft.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Mark XIV bomb sight", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

 
Phonemark Quick Data Drive Model 8500

Phonemark Quick Data Drive Model 8500

Designed for the Commodore 64 for computer program/data loading and saving.

Features:

  • High speed: 15 times audio cassette.
  • Speed selection: 892 or 14000 bits/second.
  • Reliable: 1 soft error in 10 7 bits transferred.
  • Fully computer controlled operation.
  • Drive-in-use indicator.

 
Phoenix ROM Sharer

Phoenix ROM Sharer

This internal accessory allows a Commodore Amiga 500/1500/2000 owner to switch between two different Kickstart ROM versions at the flick of a switch.

 
Commodore Amiga 2090 Hard Disk/SCSI Controller

Commodore Amiga 2090 Hard Disk/SCSI Controller

The Commodore Amiga 2090 Hard Disk/SCSI Controller supports both ST506 hard disks and SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) systems. Both 3.5" and 5.25" drives can be installed.

In addition, the A2090 can function as a SCSI "host adapter", allowing you to connect one or more external SCSI storage subsystems such as hard disks, tape streamers, or combined disk/tape systems. Most external SCSI subsystems designed for the Macintosh Plus will plug directly into the rear connector of the A2090 controller.

 
Apple IIe Extended 80-Column Text Card

Apple IIe Extended 80-Column Text Card

This expansion card for the Apple IIe adds support for 80-column text mode and also provides a 64K memory expansion.

 
Nintendo GameCube Broadband Adapter

Nintendo GameCube Broadband Adapter

This accessory for the Nintendo GameCube allows on-line play over the telephone network. This is the Japanese version.

 
WKK Remote Control System

WKK Remote Control System

This third-party infra-red controller for the Sega Mega Drive was produced by WKK Industries. Two wireless controllers can be used at once. A similar system was available for the Sega Master System.

 
Sun Ultra 60

Sun Ultra 60

The Ultra 60 is a fairly large and heavy computer workstation in a tower enclosure from Sun Microsystems. The Ultra 60 was launched in November 1997 and shipped with Solaris 7. It was available in several specifications.

 
Atari Game Controller (Alamogordo Atari Dig)

Atari Game Controller (Alamogordo Atari Dig)

This controller is one that was dug up from the Alamogordo, New Mexico desert.

The 'Atari Tomb' is a landfill site in the New Mexico desert full of Atari games, peripherals and other stock.  The story surrounding it became one of the great myths of the gaming industry.  

In 1983, the young videogame industry in North America collapsed.  One of the reasons for this was saturation of the market.  Atari, one of the giants of the industry, was left with a mountain of unsold and returned stock as consumers lost confidence in gaming.  This useless stock was dumped in a landfill site near Alamogordo, New Mexico, beginning in September 1983.

The games industry quickly recovered and became an entertainment giant.  Soon, Atari items of this vintage became desirable, and myths spread about what lost treasures might be buried in the Tomb.  The amount of speculation led to some doubt as to whether the burial site even existed.

In April 2014, an excavation took place as part of the production of a documentary on the topic.  Some 1,300 cartridges were excavated out of an estimated 728,000, and other items such as peripherals were also recovered.  They have become symbols of the early days of the gaming industry.

 
Solidisk PC Plus

Solidisk PC Plus

80168 second processor for the BCC Master 128. Unusually mounted in an external enclosure.

 
The Magnus Connection

The Magnus Connection

A computer resource pack for the offshore oil industry. Part of the Microelectronics Education Programme by BP Educational Service. Includes VHS tape, card reader, ID cards, keyboard overlays, and resource pack.

 
ACP 08 Disk Interface

ACP 08 Disk Interface

This disk interface for the Acorn Electron was produced in 1986 by Advanced Computer Products.

 
HP F1015A DOS-compatible cable

HP F1015A DOS-compatible cable

For connecting HP Palmtop PCs and HP-48 to DOS PCs.

 
Pre-printed Port-a-Punch Cards

Pre-printed Port-a-Punch Cards

These 80-column punched cards are pre-printed with the locations for IBM alphanumeric code punches. Intended for use in teaching environments.

 
marchant AC1M Adding Machine

marchant AC1M Adding Machine

Electro-mechanical adding machine.

 
Compaq Armada 4160T

Compaq Armada 4160T

Pentium-class machine laptop. Shipped with Windows 95.

 
Matrox Rainbow Runner

Matrox Rainbow Runner

This daughterboard expansion for the Matrox Mystique graphics card adds extra hardware to enable high-resolution Motion JPEG video capture and editing. It also has a composite TV-out connector and hardware MPEG1 decoder for full-screen video playback.

Pictured here attahced to the Matrox Mystique graphics card.

 
Home-made Acorn Atom ROM Switcher

Home-made Acorn Atom ROM Switcher

This home-made expansion box for the Acorn Atom allows the user to switch between multiple ROMs at the press of a button.

 
Linux Gaming Computer

Linux Gaming Computer

This Linux-based touch-screen computer was originally designed in the US for the Chuck E Cheese franchies. It was brought over to the UK in order to seek venture funding from Amadeus Group.

 
Sun Ultra 1

Sun Ultra 1

The Ultra 1 is a family of Sun Microsystems workstations based on the 64-bit UltraSPARC microprocessor. It was the first model in the Sun Ultra series of Sun computers, which succeeded the SPARCstation series. It launched in 1995 and shipped with Solaris 2.5. It is capable of running other operating systems such as Linux and BSD.

The Ultra 1 was available in a variety of different specifications. Three different CPU speeds were available - 143 MHz (Model 140), 167 MHz (Model 170) and 200 MHz (Model 200). The Ultra 1 Creator3D 170E launched in November 1995 with a list price of US$27,995.

 
Newbury 7003 Terminal

Newbury 7003 Terminal

This terminal from Newbury Laboratories Ltd is designed to connect to computers over an RS-232 serial link. An optional local printer can be connected to create hard copy.

 
EG3008 Video Genie II System

EG3008 Video Genie II System

EG3008 Video Genie System - Third Version

Video Genie (or simply Genie) was the name given to a series of computers produced by Hong Kong-based manufacturer EACA during the early 1980s. They were compatible with the Tandy TRS-80 Model I computers and could be considered a clone although there were hardware and software differences.

The computers making up the series were

    * Video Genie System (EG3003 - first version, early/mid 1980)
    * Video Genie System (EG3003 - second version, late 1980) - our unit
    * Genie I (EG3003 - third version, late 1981)
    * Genie II (EG3008 - late 1981)
    * Genie III (EG3200 - mid 1982) - a more business-oriented machine with CP/M-compatibility.

Although Video Genie was the name used in Western Europe, the machines were sold under different names in other countries. In Australia and New Zealand they were known as the Dick Smith System 80 MK I (EG3003) and System 80 MK II (EG3008). In North America they were sold as the PMC-80 and PMC-81.

Features

 CPU: Zilog Z80, at 1.76 MHz
 Video: Monochrome
           64x16 / 32x16 uppercase text
           128x48 block graphics
           Composite video output, cable included
           RF tv signal output, cable included
 16 KB RAM, expandable to 48 KB
 12 KB ROM containing Microsoft LEVEL II BASIC
 Storage: Built in 500 baud cassette deck
           Cable for using an external cassette deck included
 Built in powersupply

The EG 3008 is complete with:
EG 100 Monitor
EG 3013 Expander
EG 400 Disk drive unit

 
British Antarctic Survey

British Antarctic Survey "Micro" (caseless)

We are grateful to Michael Pinnock of the British Antarctic Survey for the following description of this exhibit:

A custom-made microcomputer used by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) on its Antarctic research stations, ships, aircraft, and its Cambridge research institute. It was primarily designed for controlling and logging data from experiments (e.g. automatic weather stations, airborne geophysics, shipborne oceanography) but could also be used for data and text processing.

Its design evolved in the early 1980's (1980-1982) and some 25 of them were produced by 1985. The last unit was taken out of service in 2003 - at that time it was still reliably logging geomagnetic field data at BAS's Halley research station.

Based around a Motorola 6809 processor, it ran the Flex operating system.

The design owes much to the rapidly evolving Cambridge microcomputer scene in the early 1980's, e.g. the first processor board used was an Acorn Atom design, although later units had a custom made processor board.

Additional design details from Jim Turton:

The BAS micro was indeed spawned from the SWTPC and Flex. However the hardware was more similar to the CMS (Cambridge Microprocessor Systems) board, which was a single board 6809 computer that also ran Flex DOS. This was also inspired by the Acorn Atom single boards around at the time. Acorn mostly used the 6502 processor - later used in the BBC Micro, but it did make a 6809 version. Although Acorn never used Flex like CMS. Essentially we cribbed this idea to design our own 19 inch card frame board. We designed the hardware and it was laid out on PCB by one Arthur Bartrum of 'Batvale' in Sutton. The processor board had 6809 processor and 8k of static memory plus address decoding only. We also developed our own bootstrap monitor which had some powerful debugging features. Additional cards had an ACIA (6851) serial port (for RS232) terminal comms, a PIA (6820) for a parallel printer port and a PIA for disc interface. Other cards had vaarious custom interfaces such as ADC's and DAC's for experiment interfacing.

For the printer we used the Epson RX80 dot matrix printer then the FX80 (or the other way round). The system supported two 5.25in floppy drives. One for the Flex DOS and programs and the other for data.

 
Intel A80386DX-20

Intel A80386DX-20

Intel i386 32-bit processor.

 
Intel 16/4 MCA Token Ring Adapter

Intel 16/4 MCA Token Ring Adapter

This Intel MicroChannel adapter allows you to connect a PS/2 computer to a TokenRing network.

 
Sound to Light Converter

Sound to Light Converter

This board was designed by Mike Cook and converts signals from the BBC Micro's cassette cable to signals which can be read from the user port. From there software would convert the data into colour visuals on screen. Originally published in The Micro User Body Build series.

 
Hom-made ZX80 Memory Expansion

Hom-made ZX80 Memory Expansion

This home-made memory expansion is designed to connect to the Sinclair ZX80.

 
Pioneer UC-V109BC Barcode Scanner

Pioneer UC-V109BC Barcode Scanner

This barcode reader is designed to connect to a Pioneer Laserdisc player to control which audio tracks and video sequences play.

 
Answer Box 100

Answer Box 100

This barcode scanner is designed to connect to a Laserdisc player and allows the user to control it by scanning barcodes. The player can be commanded to play a series of frames, switch audio tracks, or turn the video on/off.

Our Answer Box 100 is packaged as part of 'An Interactive Videodisc package for Initial Teacher Trainers' published by 'The Technical & Vocational Educational Intiative'. This package also includes a Laserdisc and two copies of the supporting book.

 
Prototype ZXpand PCBs

Prototype ZXpand PCBs

Two prototypes of the ZXpand MMC board for the Sinclair Spectrum.

 
Prototype AtoMMC PCB

Prototype AtoMMC PCB

Prototype MMC expansion board for the Acorn Atom.

 
Philip Harris DL Plus

Philip Harris DL Plus

The DL plus enables you to view, record, display, and store data collected from Philip harris First Sene or Blue Box sensors.

Whilst connected to the computer it wil gather data as a interface. More powerfully, whilst away from the computer it will record in a variety of ways, allow you to view the data graphically or in a tabular form, and store sets of data for loading into a computer later.

 
Apple IEEE-488 Interface Card

Apple IEEE-488 Interface Card

This expansion card for the Apple II allowed it to connect to an IEEE-488 (GBIP) network.

 
Apple II language Card

Apple II language Card

The Apple Language Card was designed by Wendell Sander, and was one of the first Apple cards available for the Apple II. it was released in 1979 with the Apple Pascal Language system. The Language Card provided an Autostart ROM F8 to earlier Apple systems that did not have the F8 boot ROM installed, allowing an Apple II to boot from a Disk Drive; and also provided an extra 16K of RAM to a fully expanded 48K Apple to bring the total memory available to 64k.

 
Baird Apple II Card

Baird Apple II Card

Expansion card for the Apple II. Function unknown.

 
Apple Sync Printer Interface Card

Apple Sync Printer Interface Card

Printer interface card, sychronous, for the Apple II.

 
Saturn Systems Accelerator II

Saturn Systems Accelerator II

This expansion card for the Apple II accelarates operation of software by using a high-speed 6502 processor and on-board high-speed RAM. Once activated, software runs on the board - the Apple II's original processor is left idle. The DIP-switches configure slot access speed and timing.

 
Hawk 3210 Logic Analyzer

Hawk 3210 Logic Analyzer

This logic analyzer by Hawk is designed to connect to the Apple II computer. Up to four analyzer 'pods' can be connected. It connects to the computer using a GBIB connector. The interface card contains software in ROM to operate the analyzer.

 
Toshiba T2200SX

Toshiba T2200SX

An 80386SX-based laptop.

 
Compaq LTE Elite 4/75CX

Compaq LTE Elite 4/75CX

The Compaq LTE was a line of laptop computers made by Compaq, introduced in 1989. The first models, the Compaq LTE and the Compaq LTE 286, were among the first computers to be close to the size of a paper notebook, spurring the use of the term "notebook" to describe a smaller laptop. They were also among the first to include both built-in hard disk and floppy disk drives, offering performance comparable to then-current desktop machines.

The LTE Elite series had an easily removable hard drive for data security purposes.

 
Compaq LTE Elite 4/40CX

Compaq LTE Elite 4/40CX

The Compaq LTE was a line of laptop computers made by Compaq, introduced in 1989. The first models, the Compaq LTE and the Compaq LTE 286, were among the first computers to be close to the size of a paper notebook, spurring the use of the term "notebook" to describe a smaller laptop. They were also among the first to include both built-in hard disk and floppy disk drives, offering performance comparable to then-current desktop machines.

The LTE Elite series had an easily removable hard drive for data security purposes.

 
Google Glass

Google Glass

Google Glass is an optical head-mounted display, that is designed in the shape of a pair of eyeglasses. It was developed by Janco van der Merwe with the mission of producing a ubiquitous computer. Google Glass displayed information in a smartphone-like hands-free format. Wearers communicated with the Internet via natural language voice commands. Google started selling a prototype of Google Glass to qualified "Glass Explorers" in the US on April 15, 2013, for a limited period for $1,500, before it became available to the public on May 15, 2014.

 
Toshiba Libretto 100CT

Toshiba Libretto 100CT

The Libretto110CT is a subnotebook computer designed and produced by Toshiba. Its squeezed a full Windows PC into a device the size of a paperback book. The first Libretto model, the Libretto 20, was released on April 17, 1996 (in Japan only), with a volume of 821cm (50.1cu in) and weighing just 840g (30oz), making it by far, the world's smallest commercially available Windows PC at the time, and a trend the Libretto Range continued for many years. The original Libretto line was discontinued in Europe and the U.S. in 1999, but the production continued in Japan with the SS, FF and then the L series until 2002. The first L series Libretto (The L1) was released on 18 May 2001 (in Japan only) and the last (The L5) just 11 Months later on 24 April 2002. Production of all Librettos ceased from 2002 until the release of the Libretto U100 in 2005.

The 100 model featured an Intel Pentium 166 MHz MMX, 32 MB RAM (expandable to 64 MB max), 2.1 GB hard disk, and a 7.1" TFT display.

Model number PA1254E, with I/O adaptor CAB0356A.

 
NCR C446 Core Memory

NCR C446 Core Memory

Text from PCB:

800-0005227
PRC 800-0005229
ASSY 800-0006040
ASSY 800-0006059
REGISTER

 
XT-IDE Rev 03 Kit

XT-IDE Rev 03 Kit

The XT-IDE is a modern 8-bit ISA expansion card designed to allow IBM-compatible machines with an 8-bit ISA bus to use modern 16-bit IDE hard disk drives. Revision 03 was produced in 2016 and removes several infrequently-used features from the previous revision, including the serial port and molex power connector.

Boards were available in built or kit form. This kit has not been assembled.

More details on the XT-IDE project can be found at:

http://www.glitchwrks.com/xt-ide

http://dangerousprototypes.com/docs/XT_IDE_disk_controller

 
A500 RAM Upgrade

A500 RAM Upgrade

This expansion card for the Acorn A500 expands it's memory.

 
Research Machines Disc Controller

Research Machines Disc Controller

This expansion board allows a Research Machines RM380Z computer to control two 5.25" disk drives.

 
Wyse Winterm SX0 (model S30)

Wyse Winterm SX0 (model S30)

The Wyse SX0 is a small, lightweight thin client. It has a single serial port and lacks any PS/2 ports. There are two USB ports at the front and two USB ports on the rear. It is available in a number of configurations which is reflected in the product ID: S10/S30/S50/S90. Specifications:

Processor
AMD Geode GX500 (366MHz)
Memory
64MB Flash, 128MB RAM
Video
CS5536 chip (1600 x 1200 16-bit colour)
Ports
Network, USB, Serial, Parallel, PS/2, 10/100 Ethernet
Dimensions
W x H x D: 17.5cm x 3cm x 12.5cm

 
Gravis UltraSound

Gravis UltraSound

This 16-bit ISA expansion card from Advanced Gravis Computer Technology Ltd features:

  • 16-bit 44.1kHz CD quality sound.
  • 32 multi-timbral digital and/or synthesized voices.
  • Windows 3.1 Multimedia extensions support.
  • Wave table synthesis.
  • 8-bit digital recording with sample rates from 4 to 44.1kHz in either mono or stereo. Seperate circuits allow for simultaneous recording and playback.
  • Standard MPU-401/UART MIDI interface supports MIDI in/out/passthru (with optional cable).
  • Speed compensating joystick game port.
  • Built-in 4 watt amplifier.
  • 256K onboard memory, expandable to 1MB with standard DRAM chips.
  • Optional CD-ROM interfaces for LMSI, Sony, Mitsumi, SCSI drives.

 
Analog Input Card

Analog Input Card

This 8-bit analogue input card is effectively a PC joystick expansion card. The four joystick analog inputs are implemented using a pair of 555 timers. The timer is started by a read from the CPU which then polls the card until it signals the timer has expired. The delay depends on the value of the analogue input and the values of the Rc network attached to the 555 chip.

 
Amstrad PC3286 386 Daughterboard

Amstrad PC3286 386 Daughterboard

This daughterboard adds an Intel 80386 processor to the Amstrad PC3286.

 

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