Latest Additions

Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

Tandy 1400 Professional Computer LT

Tandy 1400 Professional Computer LT

The Tandy 1400 was Tandy's first fully IBM-compatible laptop computer. It was available in three versions: the LT, FT, and HD. The main difference between the three was the inclusion of a hard drive and the presence of an external floppy drive connector.

The machine used a NEC V20 processor and shipped with up to 640KB RAM. The display was an 80x25 LCD screen. Connection to an external monitor was possible through the 9-pin TTL connector.

 
Logimouse

Logimouse

By Logitech

 
Dk'tronics ZX Spectrum Light Pen-

Dk'tronics ZX Spectrum Light Pen-

This light pen for the ZX Spectrum was produced by Dk'Tronics.

 
Microcare Powerbase

Microcare Powerbase

This third-party accessory from Microbase holds a Sinclair ZX81 computer at a more comfortable angle for use. It also has a built-in power switch and tape save/load switch, as well as a shelf extension to hold the RAM expansion pack securely.

A separate version was available for the Spectrum.

 
Super UFO Super Drive Pro 7

Super UFO Super Drive Pro 7

The Super UFO Super Drive Pro 7 (referred to as the SUFO Pro 7 in this article for brevity) is a videogame cartridge copier that can copy Nintendo SNES videogame cartridges to ordinary 3-1/2" DS/HD floppy disks. Once on this disk, the original cartridge is not needed to play the game.

Features:

  • Built-in X-Terminator codes (the manufacturer claimed over 2,000) for hundreds of videogames. X-Terminator was a feature comparable to Game Genie and is compatible with Pro Action Replay codes. X-Terminator codes can be saved to the disk.
  • Built-in controller test program.
  • Capable of reading videogame files generated by competing copier products, including UFO; G Doctor; and P Fighter.
  • Capable of maintaining a copy of the cartridge contents in memory even when the SNES is powered off and later writing the cartridge image to disk.
  • Capable of copying a videogame cartridge's BRAM (battery-backed-up RAM) to its internal BRAM. The unit can also copy its internal BRAM to a videogame cartridge's BRAM.
  • Supports two languages: English and Chinese. It can use alphanumeric (uppercase and lowercase), Japanese (Hiragana and Katakana), and special characters in filenames.

 
Tandy Color Computer 3 (CoCo 3)

Tandy Color Computer 3 (CoCo 3)

The Color Computer 3 was announced on July 30, 1986 by Tandy. It came with 128 kB of RAM, which could be upgraded to 512 kB. The keyboard surround and cartridge door plastic were changed from black to grey. The keyboard layout was revised, putting the arrow keys in a diamond configuration and adding CTRL, ALT, F1 and F2 keys. It sold in Radio Shack stores and Tandy Computer Centers for $219.95.

The CoCo 3 was compatible with most older software and CoCo 2 peripherals. Taking the place of the graphics and memory hardware in the CoCo 1 and 2 was an application-specific integrated circuit called the "GIME" (Graphics Interrupt Memory Enhancement) chip. The GIME also provided additional features:

  • Output to a composite video monitor or analog RGB monitor, in addition to the CoCo 1 and 2's TV output. This did much to improve the clarity of its output.
  • A paged memory management unit broke up the 6809's 64 kB address space into 8 × 8 kB chunks. Although these chunks were considered to be too large by many programmers, the scheme would later allow third party RAM upgrades of up to 2 MB (256 × 8 kB).
  • Text display with real lowercase at 32, 40, 64, or 80 characters per line and between 16 and 24 lines per screen.
  • Text character attributes, including 8 foreground and 8 background colors, underline, and blink.
  • New graphics resolutions of 160, 256, 320 or 640 pixels wide by 192 to 225 lines.
  • Up to 16 simultaneous colors from a palette of 64.

Previous versions of the CoCo ROM had been licensed from Microsoft, but by this time Microsoft was not interested in extending the code further. Instead, Microware provided extensions to Extended Color BASIC to support the new display modes. In order to not violate the spirit of the licensing agreement between Microsoft and Tandy, Microsoft's unmodified BASIC software was loaded in the CoCo 3's ROM. Upon startup, the ROM is copied to RAM and then patched by Microware's code. Although this was a clever way of adding features to BASIC, it was not without some flaws: the patched code had several bugs, and support for many of the new hardware features was incomplete.

 
Casio Loopy Mouse

Casio Loopy Mouse

This mouse (product code XN-110) connects to the Casio Loopy game console. Several of the games released for this system either supported or required the mouse for game play.

 
QL Rom Disq

QL Rom Disq

This card for the QL is designed to plug into the QL ROM Slot and gives up tp 8Mbytes of Witeable but permanent memory, note the 2MB card does not have all the ICs fitted, each 8MB Rom Disq has over 64 million transistors.

 
Super Q Board

Super Q Board

The SuperQBoard was a disk interface card from Sandy with up to 512K RAM, a centronics parallel printer port and Toolkit 2 on board. The 256K version could be upgraded by a small plug-in RAM card.

There were three revisions of the board. Version 1 had a heatsink by the QL connector, and 256 KB on-board. A 256 KB daughterboard would bring it up to the full compliment of 512 KB. This board implemented a floppy interface by way of a WD1770 floppy controller.

Version two deleted the heatsink and carried no memory, using a modified standard 512K Sandy memory expansion as a daughterboard. The deletion of the heatsink often meant that the 7805 voltage regulator could get very hot, but it remained within specification.

This third version had tracks that could be optionally populated with components to implement a standard QIMI mouse interface version and also implemented the floppy using a WD1770 or 1772 floppy controller.

The 

All boards included TK2 on EPROM.

These boards were sold from 1985 to 1987.

 
QL Trump Card 2  RAM expansion

QL Trump Card 2 RAM expansion

QL Trump Card 786K RAM expansion card from Miracle Systems
Dimensions 1 x 6 3/4 x 4 in.

The QL Trump Card from Miracle Systems soon became the standard expansion interface for the Sinclair QL, incorporating Toolkit II, a floppy disk interface and breaking through the 512K memory barrier on the QL, providing an additional 768K memory.

This meant that for the first time, the Sinclair QL could have 896K memory, plus Toolkit II on ROM and access to disk drives, all on one small card which plugged into the expansion bus. The additional memory also increased the speed of the QL.

Other people released updated ROMs for the Trump Card, which provided Level-2 Drivers (allowing you to control sub-directories) and built in device drivers to access PC disks. The Trump Card was also released as Trump Card 2, which worked more quickly.

The Miracle Disk Expander could be used with the Trump Card to provide it with the ability to control up to 4 floppy disk drives.

The Trump Card remained the mainstay of the average Sinclair QL user, until Miracle Systems released the later Gold Cardand Super Gold card interfaces.

 
Zenith Supersport

Zenith Supersport

Zenith Data Systems (ZDS) was a division of Zenith founded in 1979 after Zenith acquired Heathkit, who had, in 1977, entered the personal computer market. Headquartered in Benton Harbor, Michigan, Zenith sold personal computers under both the Heath/Zenith and Zenith Data Systems names. Zenith was an early partner with Microsoft, licensing all Microsoft languages for the Heath/Zenith 8-bit computers. Conversely, Microsoft programmers of the early 80s did much of their work using Zenith Z 19 and Z-29 CRT display terminals hooked to central mainframe computers.

Zenith Data Systems introduced the SupersPort SX portable computer in 1989. It featured 16 MHz 80386SX processor, 40 MB hard drive, 1.44 MB floppy drive, 1 MB RAM, 10-inch monochrome VGA LCD screen, MS-DOS 3.3. Weight is about 17 pounds; price is about US$6000. This was a battery-powered portable microcomputers designed to satisfy users who want both a small but powerful machine. A Zenith Supersport can be purchased with a 100Mbyte hard disk for $6,699.


 
Toshiba Satellite S4000CDS/4.0

Toshiba Satellite S4000CDS/4.0

Processor

  • Intel Mobile Pentium II processor
  • 233MHz (1.7V) clock speed
  • Integrated co-processor
  • 32KB internal cache
  • Integrated 512KB pipelined burst SRAM Level 2 cache
  • Data/Address Bus Width: 64-bit/32-bit
  • 66MHz Front Side Bus

Memory

  • 64Mbit Synchronous DRAM, 3.3V, 60ns
  • 32MB standard, expandable to 160MB
  • Internal memory expansion slot

BIOS

  • APM V1.2; ACPI V1.0; PnP V1.0a; VESA V2.0; DPMS; DDC2B; DMI 2.0, PCI BIOS

System Architecture

  • PCI Bus V2.1: Intel 440BX system chipset

Disk Drives

  • 4.1 billion byte Enhanced IDE, 2.5" Hard disk
  • Service -removable
  • 12.7 mm height
  • 13ms average access time
  • Supports PIO Mode 4 or Ultra DMA 33 mode 2
  • Diskette Drive:
  • Built-in 3.5", 1.44MB

CD-ROM

  • Built-in 24X max. speed CD-ROM
  • 130ms average access time
  • 3,600KB/s average data transfer rate

Display System

  • 12.1" diagonal
  • Color bright dual scan color display (Satellite 4000 CDS): up to 16 million colors at 800 x 600 resolution
  • TFT active matrix color display (Satellite 4000 CDT) : up to 16 million colors at 800 x 600 resolution
  • External Color Support:
  • 800 x 600 and 640 x 480; 85Hz Non-Interlaced @ 64K; 60Hz Non-Interlaced @ 16M
  • 1024 x 768; 60Hz Non-Interlaced @ 64K
  • 1280 x 1024; 60Hz Non-Interlaced @ 256

Expansion

  • Two PC Card slots support two Type II or one Type III PC Cards; 32-bit CardBus ready
  • SVGA video port
  • Fast infrared port (4MBps, IrDA V1.1 compliant)
  • PS/2 mouse/keyboard port (Y-connector supported)
  • Universal Serial Bus port
  • ECP parallel port
  • High speed serial port (16550 UART compatible)
  • Headphone
  • External microphone (monaural)
  • Line-in

Communications

  • 3Com-Noteworthy 56K PC Card modem with V.90 support

Keyboard

  • Full sized 84 keys with 12 function keys
  • 3mm pitch
  • Dedicated Windows keys
  • Integrated AccuPoint pointing device

Video

  • Chips & Technologies HiQVideo 65555 Graphics Controller
  • 64-bit Graphics Accelerator
  • 32-BIT PCI local bus support
  • BitBLT hardware
  • 2MB EDO DRAM Video Memory

Audio

  • Yamaha 3D sound effect-enabled, OPL3-SA3 and software-enabled Wavetable synthesis sound
  • 16-bit stereo, .WAV and Sound Blaster Pro compatible, MIDI playback
  • 2 built-in stereo speakers
  • Full duplex sound
  • Microphone, headphone and Line-in ports

 
Microbee VGA Video Converter

Microbee VGA Video Converter

Designed to enable the use of VGA monitors with older computers, the Microbee VGA video converter allows for analogue or digital inputs. The digital mode converts true CGA digital input (RGB + Intensity) and provides the proper CGA color map. This is the mode that is used by the Microbee Premium, Premium Plus & 256TC models, along with regular IBM PC’s (CGA) and numerous other computers. Also included is a jumper ‘C128FIX’ to adapt the normal CGA color set to match the Commodore 128’s 80 column mode color set (dark yellow of the CGA set is brown in the C128’s color set). The analogue mode allows for use with other computers that have true analogue outputs, such as the Commodore Amiga.

 
Juko Electronics Super Turbo ST Mainboard

Juko Electronics Super Turbo ST Mainboard

This Super Turbo ST Mainboard by Juko Electronics is an IBM PC-compatible motherboard. It uses an NEC V20 CPU running at 12MHz.

 
RetroClinic KIT/DCI - DataCentre Internal Upgrade

RetroClinic KIT/DCI - DataCentre Internal Upgrade

This kit is compatible with the BBC Micro Model B, B+ 64K, and 128K, as well as Master 128 computers. It allows the BBC Micro to read and write data from USB drives, as well as allowing disk images to be mounted from an attached PC.

 
Control UNiversal Teletext Video Card

Control UNiversal Teletext Video Card

This Eurocard-format expansion card by Control Universal allows a EuroBEEB computer to display Teletext data over an RGB video connection.

 
OAK Solutions ClassROM for A3020/4000

OAK Solutions ClassROM for A3020/4000

Oak Solutions ClassRom is designed for use in a school environment. The structure of RISC OS applications and system resources stored on a hard disc is important and if any important files are overwritten or deleted, this could stop the system working. As hard discs are read/write devices this means that there is no protection of the applications from the user (child)

ClassRom is a system of protecting hard discs. It partitions the disc in two separate areas; one which is protected (the Applications partition) and one which is read/write (the User partition). All applications, system resources and fonts are stored in the Applications partition. They are accessible to users but cannot be changed or deleted. The User partition is used for temporary file storage.

The school IT Coordinator has a management disc which allows the Application partition to be unlocked in order for new applications to be added or old ones deleted. The software is password protected.

 
Acorn Atom 50Hz Converter

Acorn Atom 50Hz Converter

This expansion card for the Acorn Atom tweaks the video timing to make it closer to the 50Hz PAL standard, although it does not add the ability to display colour -- a separate expansion board was needed for that.

 
RetroClinic 1MHz IDE Compact Flash Kit

RetroClinic 1MHz IDE Compact Flash Kit

A full fit-yourself kit, to give your BBC B or Master up to 1GB of fast hard drive storage space.

 
CUBE EuroBEEB

CUBE EuroBEEB

EuroBEEB is a 6502-based single board computer (SBC) with BBC BASIC II ROM and either 8KB or 16KB of CMOS RAM on board. EuroBEEB has been designed in Eurocard format (100mm x 160mm) with a standard DIN 41612 bus connector, making the CPU card compatible with the CUBE range of Eurocards.

Features:

  • 6502 CPU running at 2 MHz
  • On-board real-time calendar clock
  • A VIA I/O chip providing 16 I/O channels, 4 control lines, and 2 timers
  • 8 or 16 KB CMOS RAM
  • CUBE bus
  • Four 28-pin memory sockets with a choice of memory devices
  • Choice of memory maps
  • Battery backup for the real-time clocl and any CMOS RAM
  • RS-433 serial interface (RS-232 compatible)
  • RS-422 option for noisy environments
  • Autorun feature allowing turnkey operation
  • On-board BASIC II standard
  • Control BASIC extension to BBC BASIC
  • EPROMable user BASIC programs
  • Real-Time BASIC option
  • Single +5V rail supply

 
CUBE Doublestore Double Density Disk Controller

CUBE Doublestore Double Density Disk Controller

CUBE Doublestore was primarily developed to provide the disk controller for use with EuroBEEB. The designed was influenced by the license agreement for the Microware Double-density Disk Filing System (DDFS), and uses the Western Digital 2793 FDC device. With CUBE Doublestore, the complete range of Microware disk commands are available to the user.

Features:

  • Full operation with BBC BASIC on EuroBEEB.
  • Provides the disk controller for EuroBEEB.
  • 1 MHz or 2 MHz operations.
  • Single or double density.
  • On-board formatter.
  • Will support both 3.5" and 5.25" disk dives.
  • Full Microware DDFS software for 6502 users.
  • Four drive operation for 6809 FLEX users.
  • Versatile memory mapping including sideways facilities.
  • Four 28-pin paged memory sockets.
  • Support BBC-compatible DFS and FLEX disk formats.

 
CU-MEM Selecta Sideways Memory Carrier

CU-MEM Selecta Sideways Memory Carrier

CU-MEM Selecta is a 'paged' memory carrier in Eurocard format. The paging concept allows 8-bit microprocessors to overcome the limitations of a 64kB address space.

CU-MEM Selecta provides eight 28-pin memory sockets which may be configured in a variety of ways using an on-board option switch. Its great flexibility derives from an advanced design incorporating the use of PALs (Programmable Logic Arrays).

CU-MEM Selecta is designed for use with the CUBE processor cards including EuroBEEB, EuroCUBE-65, and EuroCUBE-09.

Features:

  • Accepts EPROMs up to 32kB and RAMs up to 8kB.
  • Up to 256kB of EPROMs on each board.
  • Up to 64kB of CMOS RAM on each board.
  • Battery back-up for CMOS RAM.
  • Combinations of RAM and ROM allowed.
  • Supports sideways paging on EuroBEEB.
  • Cards can be stacked to give up to 1MB of sideways memory.
  • Can give additional linear memory from &4000 to &7FFF.

 
Delegate Indio Industrial Interface

Delegate Indio Industrial Interface

The Delegate Indio is an expansion card for Control Universal computers.

General features:

  • Industrial input/output system for the control and monitoring of heavy-duty AC and DC signals.
  • Designed around the DELEGATE driver system with a 6522 VIA for user I/O.
  • Provides an interface from the CUBE Eurorack to a standard industrial I/O system, using plug-in opto-isolated modules.
  • Opto-isolated solid-state relays mounted on a 16-way motherboard.
  • Voltages up to 280 VAC will switch curents up to 3A.
  • Input and output modules freely interchangeable.
  • Fuse protection on the motherboard.

The INDIO system consists of four elementss:

  1. a Eurocard interface
  2. an interface cable
  3. a motherboard
  4. a range of opto-isolated I/O modules

 
Amstrad ALT-286 Laptop Computer

Amstrad ALT-286 Laptop Computer

Computer:  ALT 286
Processor: 80286
Screen: VGA LCD 640*480 Pixel 
Reverse by programming plus contrast and brightness switches
Graphics: Cirrus Logic
Memory: 4x 1024 KB
Harddisk: 60 MB
FDD Drive 720 KB FD-235HF
Extensionslots VGA 
ISA  
AT Keyboard 
FDD Floppydrive
System:  DOS 3.3 and DOS 5.0
Printerport Centronics
Serial Ports 2x9 Pens. One for mouse
Weight: 7 KG
RRP: £1600

 
Mapsoft Keyboard for ZX81

Mapsoft Keyboard for ZX81

This keyboard is the board and keys only, no case.

Made by Maplin, it gave the ZX81 a more professional keyboard, in a case, with full travel and correctly marked keys for the little Sinclair machine.

The keyboard did not house the computer, instead two ribbon cables came out of the side, and would be required to plug into the cable slots inside the computer, making the appearance of a seperate keyboard.

More information here: http://www.zx81stuff.org.uk/zx81/hardware/MapsoftKeyboard/hardwarefiles/.Instructions.1.jpg

 
Wizard Accessories Joystick Interface

Wizard Accessories Joystick Interface

This interface plugs into the BBC 15 pin connector, and converts to the more standard 9 pin board on the side for a regular joystick, a very good idea as BBC joysticks were expensive, and after 1986 increasingly hard to find.

 
Commodore 9R-25

Commodore 9R-25

One of a line of Calculators that has a rechargeable internal battery charged by an external PSU, very forward thinking for the time.

Type Arithmetic
Functions 8
Keys 25
Precision 8
Logic Algebraic
Display type VFD
Display size  
Printer  
Length 140 mm
Width 78 mm
Thickness 28 mm
Weight 164 g
Power Source 2xAA sealed
Country Japan
Original price unknown
Est. current value unknown
Year introduced 1976
Year discontinued 1976

Information supplied by Calculator.Org

Our calculator has a serial number of 065341.

 
Toshiba T6600C

Toshiba T6600C

Aimed at the multi media user, the computer has a 486sx processor at 66Mhz, 8MB of Ram as standard and a 510 MB hard Disk.

The keyboard can be removed from the top of the unit.

Our model has a 3.5 Drive, but no CD-Rom fitted.

 

 
IBM PC Jr 4860-067

IBM PC Jr 4860-067

The IBM PCJr (read "PC junior") was IBMs first attempt to enter the home computer market. The PCjr, IBM model number 4860, retained the IBM Pcs 8088 CPU and Bios interface for compatibility, but various design and implementation decisions led the PCjr to be a commercial failure.

It's small size and infrared keyboard which is powered by 4 AA batteries make it an interesting addition to the IBM range.

Announced November 1, 1983, and first shipped in late January 1984, the PCjr—nicknamed "Peanut" before its debut came in two models: the 4860-004, with 64 KB of memory, priced at US$669 (equivalent to $1,609 in 2016); and the 4860-067, with 128 KB of memory and a 360 KB 5.25-inch floppy disk drive, priced at US$1,269 (equivalent to $3,051 in 2016). It was manufactured for IBM inLewisburg Tennessee by Teledyne. The PCjr promised a high degree of compatibility with the IBM PC, which was already a popular business computer, in addition to offering built-in color graphics and 3 voice sound that was better than the standard PC Speaker sound and colour graphics of the standard IBM PC and compatibles of the day. The PCjr is also the first PC compatible machine that supports page flipping for graphics operation. Since the PCjr uses system RAM to store video content and the location of this storage area can be changed, it could perform flicker-free animation and other effects that were either difficult or impossible to produce on contemporary PC clones.
George Morrow was one of the few to be pessimistic about the PCjr after its announcement, predicting that Commodore's Jack Tramiel would "make mincemeat" of the "toylike" computer. "Somehow the mighty colossus looked a lot smaller that day", Poular mechanics wrote of the announcement, calling PCjr "a terrible disappointment". InCider agreed that the computer was disappointing, but observed that "no product could have lived up to the jr's pre-release publicity". The New York Times noted that "After all that waiting, it seems odd that no one appears particularly enthusiastic about the machine".Several Infoworld writers criticized the computer. Offering a "contrarian view: the PCjr could actually turn out to be a dog", Gantz wrote that "it's consumer and buyer demand that will spell success, not how awesome IBM is. It's still a free country, we don't have to buy the PCjr." John Dvorak joked that "champagne corks were popping all over the place. The bottles were being opened by Apple shareholders". John Clapp called PCjr "a pathetic, crippled computer", but glumly expected that "the magic letters IBM" and the company's enormous financial and marketing resources would let it "get away with this stuff".

Dvorak added that after the PCjr announcement "I go to my local ComputerLand dealer and everyone there is depressed. 'I'm not sure I even want to carry it,' said the manager", in contrast to the reaction to the PC. Despite Clapp's fear, when the PCjr became widely available in early 1984sales were below expectations. One store owner reported that "Interest was at a fever pitch" after the announcement, but "Once we had a demonstration model (in January), the only thing I can say is that the response was underwhelming".Stores began discounts almost immediately, and IBM admitting that demand was "variable and not growing as expected"began unusually early discounts of up to US$370 in June, but many of its 1,400 dealers could not sell their initial allotments of 25 computers. "Inventory is beginning to pile up", Time wrote in April; by August InfoWorld described it as "the colossal flop that the experts said couldn't happen";and in December Time stated that the PCjr "looked like one of the biggest flops in the history of computing...[it] sold as sluggishly as Edsels in the late 1950s".

 

Our model is complete in it's two boxes.

 
SPX 2.01

SPX 2.01

The SPX 2.01 increases the amount of colours produced by the Master 128 from 8 to 4096.

Contains a detailed manual, fitting instructions, diagram, 

 
Advanced Quarter Meg Ram

Advanced Quarter Meg Ram

The Pres Advanced Quarter Meg (AQM) Cartridge is a large 9cm x 7cm x 1.5cm creme coloured interface, the same size as an Acornsoft ROM cartridge. It connects only to an Acorn Electron computer equipped with an expansion unit (e.g. an Acorn Plus 1, an AP1 or a Rombox+).

The PRES AQM provides a whole 256K of extra sideways RAM. In conjuction with the software it was supplied with, it can be used to load ROM images into each of its separate 16K banks. It can also be configured as a "RAM Disc", allowing instantaneous loading of games from the cartridge.

 
OQO Model 01

OQO Model 01

In early 2005 OQO launched its model 1 – probably the smallest machine yet to run full-blown Windows. It was little larger than a standard PDA, had the sort of build quality you’d be more likely to associate with military hardware, and it had a sliding screen which smoothly rolled back on a rack-and pinion-system to reveal a full blown QWERTY keyboard, complete with number pad, underneath.

The original OQO model 01 was announced several years before prototypes were even seen, leading many people to call it vaporware until it was finally released in the fall of 2004. The computer shipped with windows XP installed (Home Edition or Professional, but the tablet PC Edition was not available until the model 01+ was released) and featured a 1 GHZ Transmeta Crusoe processor, 20 GB HD, and 256 MB of RAM. It included USB 1.1, Fire Wire, a headphone port, and a built-in microphone, integrated wireless radio, as well as Blutooth. The OQO uses an Wacom electromagnetic induction-type pen stylus with a magnetic field sensitive 800x480 resolution transflective screen. Retail shipments began on October 14, 2004. Its size is 4.9 in by 3.4 in by 0.9 in and it weighs 0.9 lbs

OQO ceased operations in April 2009

 
Little Berg Printer

Little Berg Printer

BERG, which stands for British Experimental Rocket Group, started out in 2005 as a design consultancy working for clients including Google and Intel and developing innovative apps such as Mag+, the first magazine publishing platform for the iPad. In 2012 BERG was named one of the world’s 50 most innovative companies by Fast Company.

BERG became a darling of the UK tech scene thanks to this Little Printer, a cute wireless desktop mini-printer that prints information culled from the user's favourite news, information and social media sources onto thermal paper to create a personalised miniature newspaper.

The charming product was an early indicator of the possibilities of "internet of things" technology and was shortlisted for the Design Museum's Design of the year award in 2013.

BERG had planned to build a business around the technology they had developed for Little Printer and launched BERG CLOUD, which they described as "cloud services for hardware innovators".

However, despite receiving a round of funding in 2013 to push Little Printer and its associated technology onto the market, Berg announced that the company was to close in September 2014.

 
Amstrad PCW9512 Test PCB

Amstrad PCW9512 Test PCB

A development board for the Amstrad PCW9512. Labelled ''Test PCB".

 
Sinclair QL (German)

Sinclair QL (German)

The Sinclair QL German model featured standard D-sub connectors for the serial ports instead of the proprietary connectors used in the original model, also it seems to

 
Daytona Netfax - NFX101

Daytona Netfax - NFX101

 

Notes: produced for Netfax by Acorn in 1997.  Notes provided by donor: 

Between 1996 and 1998, I worked for Acorn Computers (before they went into liquidation) in the division that became Advanced RISC Technologies (or ART for short). As well as the division responsible for the desktop computers, it was also a consultancy shop that did bespoke work for hire.
 
One of its clients was a company called Netfax, who had patented a way of sending faxes using better compression. They hired ART to develop a product that they could sell using this algorithm, the idea being there would be a line in for a normal phone socket connection (this was obviously in the days of dial-up) and a line out to the regular FAX machine. The product would then act as the arbiter in the middle carrying out the compression of the FAX and sending/receiving it.
 
Two prototype products were made, the Laguna, which was a ‘black box’ and simply did nothing more than sending FAXes in a speedier fashion, and the Daytona, which had a keyboard and a screen, and could also be used as an emailer, hold email/FAX addresses, schedule FAX/email sending for each day of the week and other functionality.
 
I worked as an engineer on the latter, handling the scheduling, address book, configuration and a few other bits and pieces to do with the UI. Netfax paid ART a very small sum for this work, but every engineer working on the project also got shares in the company (tiny in value though they were). Both models ran RISC OS 3.5, and used an ARM7500FE processor (from what I can remember).
There’s a lot more information on how the company eventually slid into a bitter feud between its senior execs here:https://www.forbes.com/forbes/1999/0419/6308182a.html
It’s worth noting that in that article, Victor Lombardi states that there was ‘trouble with the subcontractor’. Well, I have a fully working production prototype here that proves otherwise. ART eventually cut ties with Netfax as they didn’t pay up on a due date.
Archived from this donation:

 

 
Acorn BBC Winchester Disc 110

Acorn BBC Winchester Disc 110

External Hard Disk for the BBC Microcomputer. Connects to the 1Mhz Bus port of the BBC Micro. Includes a 5.25" Floppy Disk drive in the case as well as a hard disk.

 
Amstrad PCW 9512+

Amstrad PCW 9512+

The Amstrad PCW 9512+


 
ICL Serial Peripheral Board

ICL Serial Peripheral Board

This 8-bit ISA expansion card from ICL appears to be some sort of serial communications board. The two large chips in the upper left are a Zilog serial communications controller and a custom ICL-specific LSI logic chip. The upper-right portion of the board has it's own ground plane and seems to be mostly analogue electronics with an RS485 interface chip. Any additional information about this item would be much appreciated.

Identifying marks:

  • 88808514 PRN 80093195 ICL (C) 1987 MLA04

 
Dreamcast Visual Memory Unit

Dreamcast Visual Memory Unit

"Visual Memory expands Dreamcast's gaming experience beyond the boundary of consoles. As well as being a memory cartridge, which allows you to save scores and game data from your Dreamcast, Visual Memory is a tiny portable games machine. Thanks to a liquid-crystal display on the front, you can load programs from your Dreamcast ont othe Visual Memory and play games on the move. Visual Memory slots into a wide variety of Dreamcast peripherals where the extra screen can display special game information. In addition, plugging two Visual Memory units together will allow you to share data between players."

 
DivMMC EnJOY! mint

DivMMC EnJOY! mint

The DivMMC EnJOY! mint is the little brother of the DivMMC EnJOY! interface. Unlike it's predecessor it lacks a case or joystick port. It features an NMI button for a break-in menu, as well as a reset button. It is  compatible with all Sinclair ZX Spectrum models: 16K, 48K, 48K+, 128K, +2, +2A, +2B, +3, and some clones. It is not compatible with the Spanish Investronica ZX Spectrum 128K.

 
Sinclair Spectrum with Homemade Keyboard

Sinclair Spectrum with Homemade Keyboard

This Sinclair Spectrum has had the standard keyboard replaced with a homemade cardboard and metal keyboard.

 
Papenmeier BrailleX Elba

Papenmeier BrailleX Elba

The BrailleX Elba is a combination braille display and keyboard.

 
Ferranti Memory Array 703897-D

Ferranti Memory Array 703897-D

Ferranti Memory Array, part number 703897-D. Serial number 540.

 
IBM MCA 5.25

IBM MCA 5.25" 360KB External Diskette Adapter

This adapter card plugs into a Microchannel bus slot and provides a DC-37F connector for an external 360KB 5.25" disk drive. It also has an edge connector which can be connected to a 'drive sled' adaptor for the internal drive bay.

Identifying marks:

  • IBM ASM P/N 72X6753
  • IBM FRU P/N 72X6758
  • IBM ASM P/N 72X6755

 
Opto-Transprocessor Exmem II Board

Opto-Transprocessor Exmem II Board

This 16-bit ISA expansion board for the PC features SIMM expansion memory and an IMST425-G25S 32-bit CMS microprocessor. The input/outputs ports suggest it was used for some form of video/image processing.

Identifying marks:

  • ASSY 6706394 SCHEM 6322949
  • OPTO-TRANSPROCESSOR EXMEM II

 
Owl Computers Owlmodem

Owl Computers Owlmodem

This expansion card from Owl Computers allows an Apple II to connect to remote computers over the public telephone network.

Identifying marks:

  • Owl Computers owlmodem 1981
  • Jeaborough Limited

 
IBM 64-256KB Memory Expansion

IBM 64-256KB Memory Expansion

This 8-bit ISA expansion card adds between 64KB and 256KB of RAM to an IBM-compatible PC. The RAM is added in four banks, with each bank consisting of eight memory chips to store data and one memory chip to store a parity bit.

Identifying marks:

  • 1501989 433 V0011
  • 5510003

 
Lung Hwa VGA Interface Card

Lung Hwa VGA Interface Card

This 16-bit ISA expansion card produced by Lung Hwa Electronics of Taiwan provides VGA graphic support with a maximum resolution of 1024x786 pixels.

Identifying marks:

  • S/N: 20912641
  • XP6676C
  • P/N 59-676C-0001 V1.0

 
Novell Ethernet Controller

Novell Ethernet Controller

This expansion board from Novell connects an ISA-bus PC to an Ethernet network using either a BNC connector or AUI connector.

Identifying marks:

  • BD #738-149-002 REV C
  • ASSY #810-149-002 REV D
  • 1092194

 
Unisys EISA Ethernet Controller

Unisys EISA Ethernet Controller

This expansion board connects to a PC via the EISA bus (typically used in server-class machines) and connects to an ethernet network using either BNC, AUI, or RJ11 connectors.

Identifying marks:

43601848-002 REV C

SLTN9418

J000FPSZ

 
CHI1012H Serial/Parallel Board

CHI1012H Serial/Parallel Board

This generic expansion board connects to a PC's ISA bus and provides one serial and one parallel port. On this board, the port are exposed on internal connectors instead of external D-sub connectors.

 
IBM 16/4 Short ISA Token Ring Adapter

IBM 16/4 Short ISA Token Ring Adapter

This half-length ISA expansion card allows a computer to be connected to a Token Ring local network.

Identifying marks:

  • 92F4554 ECC24968 V0011002830
  • IBM 53 5S 1914119990

 
Adaptec AHA-1510A

Adaptec AHA-1510A

This Adaptec expansion board allows the connection of SCSI disk drives to an ISA bus computer. The board itself can be populated as any of the 1510A, 1520A, or 1522A models. The different models are:

  • AHA-1510A: ISA-to-SCSI host adapter
  • AHA-1520A: ISA-to-SCSI host adapter with onboard BIOS
  • AHA-1522A: ISA-to-SCSI host adapter with onboard BIOS and floppy drive controller

This particular board is the mininal 1510A configuration.

Identifying marks:

  • AHA-1510A 555700 9521
  • ASSY 554006-02
  • FAB 554007-00 REV D
  • BA0E5210FYX

 
1PC-SATAR Expansion Board

1PC-SATAR Expansion Board

This PCI expansion board allows the connection of one serial ATA storage device, using either the internal or external connectors.

Identifying marks:

  • S/N: 89070100668
  • 1PC-SATAR-01.1

 
Princess Peach Amiibo

Princess Peach Amiibo

Amiibo is Nintendo's wireless communications and storage protocol, for use between figurines and the company's game consoles from the 3DS onwards.  Amiibo figures can provide new characters and abilities in game when placed near one of these consoles.

This item is the Princess Peach amiibo.  Peach is the main female character in Nintendo's Mario series of games.  The item was acquired for the Centre's Women in Gaming exhibition in October 2017.

 
Samus Amiibo

Samus Amiibo

Amiibo is Nintendo's wireless communications and storage protocol, for use between figurines and the company's game consoles from the 3DS onwards.  Amiibo figures can provide new characters and abilities in game when placed near one of these consoles.

This item is the Samus amiibo.  Samus is the star of Nintendo's Metroid series of games.  The item was acquired for the Centre's Women in Gaming exhibition in October 2017.

 

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