Latest Additions

Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

Going Places

Going Places

Hospital for sick children Gt Ormond Street

 
Apple Super Serial Card II

Apple Super Serial Card II

This expansion card for the Apple II provides one serial communications port.

 
Amitar A500+ Memory Expansion

Amitar A500+ Memory Expansion

This expansion board for the A500+ allows you to add up to four SIMM memory modules to your Amiga.

 
Dreamcast Visual Memory Unit (US)

Dreamcast Visual Memory Unit (US)

This Dreamcast Visual Memory unit (VMU) in transparent green is for US (NTSC) systems.

 
Microbee Premium Plus

Microbee Premium Plus

The Microbee Premium Plus is a hybrid kit computer. The baseboard (which has the keyboard, Z80 CPU, PIO, 6545 screen controller and video circuits) is supplied in kit form with comprehensive assembly instructions, and the coreboard is pre-assembled using mostly surface mount technology. it is, effectively, an updated version of the original Microbee computer. The new coreboard design includes floppy disk emulation and storage via SDcard. There is also an ethernet port and high speed serial (RS232) port. There is also another microprocessor on the new coreboard and it has been configured to make the Premium Plus a true dual processor computer.

More information can be found here.

 
IBM Monochrome Display Adapter

IBM Monochrome Display Adapter

The IBM monochrome display adapter ('MDA') was one of two display adapters offered with the IBM Personal Computer. It used a 6845 CRT controller and 4KB of RAM to implement a 40x80 text mode display capable of two levels of intensity, bold, and underline effects. No graphics modes were supported, but as IBM expected it to be primarily purchased by business users it did include a parallel printer port. It's RAM and I/O ports were deliberately mapped to different locations than the CGA graphics card, allowing the MDA to be used simultaneously with a colour graphics board.

 
Amiga Action Replay Mk III

Amiga Action Replay Mk III

Amiga Action Replay plugs into the expansion port of the Amiga A500 and allows the user to freeze any program or activate slow-motion mode. By Datel.

 
Pioneer PX-TB7 Tablet

Pioneer PX-TB7 Tablet

The Pioneer PX-TB7 tablet connects to any MSX computer (and was designed specifically for Pioneer's PX-7 model) to allow user input using a pen.

 
Sage IV

Sage IV

The Sage IV came out in 1983, a year later than the Sage II. The Sage IV used the same CPU logic board as the Sage II and added a second board that sat atop the first board and connected via the system bus connectors. This second PCB contained another 512 KB of DRAM, four serial ports for supporting more simultaneous users, and a winchester controller connecting to either a 5 MB or 40 MB hard disk.

 
Nintendo Game Boy Rechargeable Battery Pack/Ac Adapter

Nintendo Game Boy Rechargeable Battery Pack/Ac Adapter

When fully charged, the Rechargeable Battery Pack provides 10 hours of power for the Nintendo Game Boy. Removable AC cord and snap action belt clip.

 
Amstrad CPC 6128 Plus

Amstrad CPC 6128 Plus

The CPC 6128 Plus was one of three machines in the Amstrad "Plus" range which tweaked the CPC hardware in many ways and added a cartridge slot to all models. Most improvements were to the video display which saw an increase in palette to 4096 colours and gained the capability of hardware sprites. Splitting the display into two separate windows and pixel scrolling both became fully supported hardware features although both were possible on the non-"Plus" hardware using clever programming of the existing Motorola 6845. An automatic DMA transfer system for feeding the sound chip was also added but the sound chip itself remained unchanged. Additionally, the BASIC command set for disc access was improved.

 
SQ88C Disk Drive

SQ88C Disk Drive

This external SCSI disk drive accepts 88MB hard disk cartridges.

 
Commodore Amiga A2630

Commodore Amiga A2630

This expansion card for the Commodore Amiga upgraded the system's CPU to either:

  • 68030 @ 25 MHz, PGA
  • 68882 @ 25 MHz, PGA
  • can also be upgraded to 50 MHz with CSA's Rocket Launcher

It also included memory expansion of:

  • 2 or 4 MB RAM on board
  • capable of DMA, but does not support burst mode
  • 16 or 32 256k×4 page mode ZIPs 80-100 ns
  • expansion slot for third party RAM boards

 
Altai Joystick Splitter Lead

Altai Joystick Splitter Lead

This lead by Altai allows you to connect two joysticks to the BBC Micro.

 
QuickShot Aviator 3

QuickShot Aviator 3

This third-party accessory for the Sega Mega Drive connects to both the player one and player two joypad ports. It maps the forward/back left/right movement of the control yoke to the joypad's up/down/left/right d-pad. The A/B/C buttons are positioned around the user's trigger fingers. A rapid-fire feature can be enabled for any of the three action buttons, as well as the start button ('slow-motion mode').

 
Fujitsu DynaMo 640

Fujitsu DynaMo 640

This external SCSI disk drive accepts magneto-optical disk cartridges in 128, 230, 540, and 640 MB capacities.

 
Cyrix 386 to 486 Upgrade

Cyrix 386 to 486 Upgrade

This upgrade kit contains a Cyrix CX486SRx2 CPU, designed to plug into a 386 processor socket. It also includes utilities to test and monitor the CPUs cache performance.

 
Radofin 3016 Hobby Module

Radofin 3016 Hobby Module

This cartridge fits the following programmable video systems:

  • Radofin model 1292
  • Radofin model 1392
  • Acetronic MPU 1000
  • Prinztronic Microprocessor
  • Audiosonic PP 1292

It provides a machine code monitor program and allows the user to enter and debug programs using the two joypads as a singel keyboard. Programs can be loaded and saved to cassette tape using the DIN connector on the rear of the cartridge. The manual provides a basic introduction to assembly-language programming and a more detailed introduction to the available opcodes for the Radofin CPU. It also documents the programmable video and sound generators, as well as useful subroutines exposed by the monitor ROM.

 
Acorn System 1

Acorn System 1

An Acorn System 1 board with 5-pin DIN socket added to the left expansion port.

 
White Replica ZX Spectrum (Millionth Edition)

White Replica ZX Spectrum (Millionth Edition)

To celebrate the one millionth ZX Spectrum being produced, a special one-off Spectrum was presented to creator Clive Sinclair. This 'millionth edition' had a unique white case.

This item is a modern replica of that case, containing an original ZX Spectrum circuit board.

 
Acorn Electron (Trial ROM)

Acorn Electron (Trial ROM)

This early model Acorn Electron contains an issue one board with a 16K EPROM marked "ELK 036" replacing the lower BASIC ROM. It has serial number 06-ALA01-0000087, marking it as the 87th machine produced by Acorn's Malaysian plant. When the machine turns on, the usual "Acorn Electron" banner is instead replaced by "Electron Trial".

 
ColecoVision Expansion Module No 2 - Steering Wheel

ColecoVision Expansion Module No 2 - Steering Wheel

Expansion Module No. 2 adds a steering wheel controller to your ColecoVision console.

 

 
Prototype / Homebrew 6809 Computer with Acorn System 1 Keyboard

Prototype / Homebrew 6809 Computer with Acorn System 1 Keyboard

A prototype / homebrew 6809 based computer with Acorn System 1 Keyboard.

 

 
Apple Macintosh PowerBook G3/400

Apple Macintosh PowerBook G3/400

Apple PowerBook G3 Series
Family number M7572

 
Commodore VC 1541 Disk Drive

Commodore VC 1541 Disk Drive

The 1541 disk drive was the most popular disk drive used with the Commodore 64 computer. The 5.25" floppy disks were capable of storing 170Kb of data.
 
The drives used a serial interface and were relatively slow in transferring data at just 300 bytes per seccond. Various third party programs were able to speed this up to rates of around 4000 bytes per second.
 

 
Atari 800 - 16K Memory Module

Atari 800 - 16K Memory Module

'This easily installed module allows you to expand the memory capacity of your ATARI 800 personal computer system.  It enables you to write longer programs, store more data, and run Atari 810 Floppy Disk Recorders.'

 
Pioneer PX-7(BK)

Pioneer PX-7(BK)

The Pioneer PX-7 is an MSX1 computer, aimed at the Japanese market. It was meant for attaching to a Laserdisc player, and as such has Superimpose capabilities. The PSG sound is stereo, contrary to almost all MSX machines.

The PX-7 was available in black and in silver with lilac keyboard keys. This PX-7 is the PX-7(BK) which was released in the UK in black.

A graphic tablet (PX-TB7) was also sold with the Palcom PX-7. With this you could create illustrations, shapes and various backgrounds, then store up to 8 of these shapes with their respective animation programmes into the computer memory.

The LD-700 Laser Disc Player was also sold as an option. When linked to the Palcom PX-7, the computer could entirely control it and exchange information.

Pionner also sold the ER-101 interface (Laser Vision) unit which made it possible for all MSX computers to have the same functionalities as the Palcom PX-7.

 
Rockwell AIM-65 computer (grey case)

Rockwell AIM-65 computer (grey case)

This Rockwell AIM-65 computer is housed in a grey plastic case.

 
Computer Stop 16K RAM Board

Computer Stop 16K RAM Board

This expansion board for the Apple II adds 16K RAM.

 
Titan Technologies Accelerator II

Titan Technologies Accelerator II

The Accelerator //e was released in 1984 by Titan Technologies (formerly Saturn Systems), and was an upgraded version of the original Saturn Accelerator, in response to the introduction of the Apple IIe. The card maintained the 64 KB of RAM of the original card and added the newer 65c02 microprocessor. This card solved the Auxiliary RAM incompatibility problem of the older card, however it did not speed up this second bank of RAM which was common on the Apple IIe.

 
Sound Blaster CT1350B (late model)

Sound Blaster CT1350B (late model)

Sound Blaster SB2.0 8 bit Sound Card 1991 Reference: CT1350B
 
The Sound Blaster family of sound cards was for many years the de facto standard for audio on the IBM PC compatible system platform, before PC audio became commoditized, and backward-compatibility became less of a feature.
 
The creator of Sound Blaster is the Singapore-based firm Creative Technology, also known by the name of its United States subsidiary, Creative Labs.
 
Sound Blaster 2.0 added support for "auto-init" DMA, which assisted in producing a continuous loop of double-buffered sound output and increased the maximum playback rate to 44 kHz (the same maximum as the Sound Blaster Pro, released around the same time). The earlier Sound Blaster 1.0 or 1.5 could be upgraded to support auto-init DMA by replacing the socketed V1.00 DSP with a V2.00 DSP, which was available from Creative Labs.-

 
Rockwell AIM-65 computer (caseless)

Rockwell AIM-65 computer (caseless)

The Rockwell AIM-65 computer was a development computer based on the MOS Technology 6502 microprocessor introduced in 1976. The AIM-65 was essentially an expanded KIM-1 computer. Available software included a monitor with line at a time assembler/disassembler, BASIC interpreter, assembler, Pascal, PL/65, and FORTH development system. Available hardware included a floppy disk controller and a backplane for expansion.

The AIM 65 (R6500 based Advanced Interactive Microcomputer) is an under $500 microcomputer, complete with keyboard, display and hard copy printer. It has extensive options, many interfaces and expansion capabilities. The AIM 65 is also a mini-development system at the price of most evaluation boards. In addition to bare board blue-coller versions, the AIM 65 is available in an enclosure, complete with power supply, for use as a desk top computer. 

Standard software included the system console monitor software in ROM, called Advanced Interactive Monitor. It featured line assembler, disassembler, setting and viewing memory and registers, starting execution of other programs and more. Single stepping was made possible using non-maskable interrupt (NMI). The command prompt was the less-than sign "<", and on receiving a single character command, it added this input character and the greater-than sign ">". If the thermal printer was turned on, this would be output on a single line. The monitor included a number of service routines that could be accessed and used by a user's program to control I/O and code execution, and was fully documented, including source code.

The machine featured dual cassette tape control. This made it possible to write large assembly programs using the two pass assembler ROM. Source code in text was written twice consecutively to the input tape, and then the assembler, which could start/stop the input cassette tape using motor control was invoked. During the first pass the symbol table was built and stored in RAM. During the second pass symbols would be translated and code written out to the second tape, also using start/stop motor control. Being able to avoid storing code in RAM made it possible to save much space. It was however, still important to keep the symbols list short since RAM size was often no more than 4 KB.

PRICE: US $375 w/1K RAM

ORIGIN U.S.A. 1976
BUILT-IN LANGUAGE Optional Basic ROM
KEYBOARD Full-stroke keyboard
CPU Rockwell 6502 @ 1MHz
RAM 4 KB (up to 32 KB of static RAM)
ROM 12 KB
TEXT MODES 20-digit alpha-numeric LED

There are 5 ROM sockets available for program installation, but 2 of them are normally occupied by the Monitor/Text Editor. The Monitor can be considered the Operating System, since it provides the over-all system control. 

The three remaining ROM sockets can be used for user-defined programs to be installed. BASIC, PASCAL, FORTH, or an Assembler/disassembler can also be installed, although the PASCAL ROMS require an additional expansion module. 

The AIM 65 can directly interface with external peripherals with its two 8-bit bi-directional parallel ports, a 9600 baud serial port, 4 control lines, and 2 timers.

 
Cosmac Super Elf

Cosmac Super Elf

The SuperElf single-board computer was made by Quest Electronics. It was an improvement of the Netronics Elf and Elf II training boards, also based on the RCA 1802, one of the first RISC microprocessors.

The board also featured an 1861 video chip that was closely tied to the 1802 to generate a video image of 128x64 dots.

2, 4 or 6 7-segment Led display could be used. Its hexadecimal keyboard allowed programs to be entered and controlled more efficiently thanks to 8 function keys:

  • I - Input
  • L - Load mode
  • R - Reset
  • G - Go (run mode)
  • W - Wait (processor clock could be stopped)
  • M - enable Monitor ROM
  • S - Single step
  • P - Protect memory

The main board had connections for a speaker (and a circuit to drive the speaker). Sound was entirely software driven as the hardware simply had a single digital output bit (Q) tied to an LED and also to the speaker.

An optional expansion board could be added, providing serial port (software driven), cassette interface (also software driven), 1 KB ROM monitor, optional 2K tiny basic, 4 KB RAM. 2 S-100 slots where additional static memory or a video board could be used. Along with a Super Monitor, there where two versions of pitman's tiny basic, one that used the 1861 video chip and another that used a 64 characters x16lines s-100 video board.

The cassette's output used the same 'Q' output used for audio on the main board, which meant that you heard all of your data as it was written out to cassette.

The 9 LEDs along the left side of the keypad indicate the state of the 'Q' output, the current operating mode (Load, Reset, Run, Wait) as well as the current state of the CPU (Fetch, Execute, DMA, Interrupt).

 
Jupiter Ace

Jupiter Ace

The Jupiter ACE was a British home computer of the 1980s, marketed by a company named Jupiter Cantab. The company was formed by Richard Altwasser and Stephen Vickers, who had been on the design team for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum.

The Jupiter ACE somewhat resembled a ZX81 in a white case, with black rubber keys like the Spectrum. It displayed output on a television, and programs could be saved and loaded on cassette tape, as was standard at that time. The machine came with 3 KB RAM, expandable to 49 K. While it had only one video mode, text only, which displayed 24 rows of 32 columns of characters in black and white, it was possible to display graphics, by redefining the 8×8 pixel bitmap of any of the 128 characters. Like the ZX Spectrum, the machine's audio capabilities were restricted to beeps of programmable frequency and duration, output through a small built-in speaker.

The major difference from the 'introductory computer' that was the ZX81, however, was that the Jupiter ACE's designers, from the outset, intended the machine to be for programmers: the machine came with Forth as its default programming language. Though this gave a great speed advantage over the interpreted BASIC that was used on other machines, it did, along with the meager sound and graphics capabilities compared to the upcoming competition, keep the ACE squarely in a niche market. Sales of the machine were never very large. The reported number of Ace’s sold before Jupiter Cantab closed for business was around 8,000. Surviving machines are quite uncommon, fetching quite high prices as collectors items.
   Jupiter Aces General Specifications.
  • CPU: Z80A running at 3.25 MHz
  • Language: O/S: Ace Forth [not a standard fig-Forth or Forth-79].
  • ROM: 2 x 4kB Eproms containing the FORTH compiler and editor.
  • RAM: 3 kB expandable to 51kB.
  • Program Storage: 1500 baud cassette tape.
  • Video Display: 32 x 24 Monochrome Graphics, High Res: 64 x 48,
    all 128 characters redefinable.
  • Keyboard: 40 key rubber membrane, with auto-repeat on every key,
    and two shift keys allow ASCII codes to be produced.
  • Sound: Single channel buzzer.
  • Interfaces: TV connector [UHF TV set to Channel 36], Cassette port x2: Ear & Mic,
    power (9v), two edge connectors: first has a complete address and data lines from
    the cpu, Second: has data and some selection lines.
  • Size: 215 x 190 x 30 mm.
  • Wait: 246g.
  • Documentation: 182 page Users manual.
 
 
The above information was taken from http://www.jupiter-ace.co.uk/  Further information can also be found at www.jupiter-ace.com

 
Heathkit ET-3400 Trainer

Heathkit ET-3400 Trainer

The Heathkit/Zenith MicroComputer Learning System model ET-3400 was a very popular item designed to teach principles of computers and programming at Universities in the 1970s., and to educate the students of internal computer hardware and software components by self-assembly and programming the machine in pure Hexadecimal language.

It was delivered in assembled or Kit form. It also featured a prototype area and could be used as a design aid for developing special interface circuitry with common 6820 parallel interface or 6850 asynchronous chips.

Several software in ROM were also available. Among them an Assembler and a Tiny BASIC.

Built-in Language
Monitor in ROM
Keyboard
17 keys Hexadecimal keypad
Cpu
Motorola 6800 then 6808 (1981) and 6802 (1987)
Speed
1 MHz
RAM
256 bytes expandable to 1 KB
ROM
1 KB
Display
6 x 7-segment LEDs
Size/weight
30.5 (W) x 30.5 (D) x 10.15 (H) cm. / 2 Kgs
Price
$199.95 Kit, $279.00 assembled

 
Sound Blaster Pro Value Edition

Sound Blaster Pro Value Edition

The Sound Blaster Pro, announced in May 1991, was the first significant redesign of the Sound Blaster card's core features, and complied with the Microsoft MPC standard. The Sound Blaster Pro supported faster digital input and output sampling rates (up to 22.05 kHz stereo or 44.1 kHz mono), added a "mixer" to provide a crude master volume control (independent of the volume of sound sources feeding the mixer), and a crude high pass or low pass filter. The Sound Blaster Pro used a pair of YM3812 chips to provide stereo music-synthesis (one for each channel). The Sound Blaster Pro was fully backward compatible with the original Sound Blaster line, and by extension, the AdLib sound card. The Sound Blaster Pro was the first Creative sound card to have a built-in CD-ROM interface. Most Sound Blaster Pro cards featured a proprietary interface for a Panasonic (Matsushita MKE) drive. The Sound Blaster Pro cards are basically 8-bit ISA cards, they use only the lower 8 data bits of the ISA bus. While at first glance it appears to be a 16-bit ISA card, it does not have 'fingers' for data transfer on the higher "AT" portion of the bus connector. It uses the 16-bit extension to the ISA bus to provide the user with an additional choice for an IRQ (10) and DMA (0)m channel only found on the 16-bit portion of the edge connector.

 
Creative PC-DVD Encore 5x

Creative PC-DVD Encore 5x

This upgrade kit from Create labs combined a 5x-speed internal DVD drive with an MPEG-2 accelerator decoding board. The DVD video was overlaid onto the computer's display using a video pass-through cable.

 
Sound Blaster 16 PCI

Sound Blaster 16 PCI

In 1998 Creative Technology acquired Ensoniq and subsequently released the Sound Blaster 16 PCI. The Sound Blaster 16 PCI was based on Ensoniq AudioPCI technology and is therefore unrelated to the ISA Sound Blaster 16, Sound Blaster 16 VIBRA and Sound Blaster 16 WavEffects. It has no dedicated hardware for Adlib/OPL support, instead using the Ensoniq sample-synthesis engine to (somewhat poorly) simulate it. It is General MIDI compatible in most games.

Our Sound Blaster 16 PCI is sealed in it's original box and has the following idenitfying marks:

  • Serial number: M4740220074497
  • Model number: SB4740
  • Product part number: 5047401001

 
Timex Sinclair 1000

Timex Sinclair 1000

The Timex Sinclair 1000 (TS1000) was the first computer produced by Timex Sinclair, a joint-venture between Timex Corporation and Sinclair Research. It was launched in July 1982.

The TS1000 was a slightly-modified Sinclair ZX81 with an NTSC RF modulator instead of a UK PAL (Units sold in Portugal have a PAL RF modulator) device and the onboard RAM doubled to 2K. The TS1000's casing had slightly more internal shielding but remained the same as Sinclair's, including the membrane keyboard. It had black-and-white graphics and no sound. It was followed by an improved version, the Timex Sinclair 1500.

Like the Sinclair ZX81, the TS1000 used a form of BASIC as its primary interface and programming language. To make the membrane keyboard less cumbersome for program entry, the TS1000 used a shortcut system of one-letter "keywords" for most commands (e.g. pressing "P" while the cursor was in "keyword mode" would generate the keyword "PRINT"). Some keywords required a short sequence of keystrokes (e.g. SHIFT-ENTER S would generate the keyword "LPRINT"). The TS1000 clued the user in on what to expect by changing the cursor to reflect the current input mode.

The TS1000 sold for $99.95 in the US when it debuted, making it the cheapest home computer to date at the time of its launch (its advertising angle was "the first computer under $100".) This pricing initiated a price war with Commodore International, who quickly reduced the price of its VIC-20 to match and later announced a trade-in program offering $100 for any competing computer toward the purchase of a Commodore 64. Since the TS1000 was selling for $49 by this time, many customers bought them for the sole purpose of trading it in to Commodore.

The black-and-white display showed 32 columns and 24 lines, 22 of which were normally accessible for display, with 2 reserved for data entry and error messages. The limited graphics were based on geometric shapes contained within the operating system's non-ASCII character set. The only form of long-term storage was a home tape cassette recorder. The 16K memory expansion sold for $49.95. A shortage of the memory expansions coupled with a lack of software that would run within 2K meant that the system had little use for anything other than an introduction to programming. Home computer magazines of the era such as Compute! showed enthusiasts how to interface the computer with various kinds of equipment, providing the opportunity for learning about early speech synthesis technology through a Speak & Spell, robotics control through the memory port, and scrolling text displays for advertising.

Over time, the TS1000 spawned a cottage industry of third-party add-ons designed to help remedy its limitations. Full-size keyboards, speech synthesizers, sound generators, disk drives, and memory expansions (up to 64K) were a few of the options available. Languages such as Forth and Pascal, as well as BASIC compilers and assemblers augmented the TS1000's programming possibilities. Microcomputing magazine published an article in April 1983 decrying the membrane keyboard ("The designers of the Timex-Sinclair 1000 ... reduced this important programming tool to a fraction of the required size") and describing how to wire up external full-size keyboards.

Type Home computer
Release date July 19
Discontinued 1983
Operating system Sinclair BASIC
CPU Zilog Z80A @ 3.25 MHz
Memory 2 KB

Our model is missing the sticker with the model number and a serial number, but is otherwise in excellent condition and complete with the original packaging and manual.

 
ICL Perq 3A

ICL Perq 3A

The PERQ 3A (otherwise known as the ICL 3300 Advanced Graphics Workstation) was developed by ICL as a replacement for the PERQ 2 in 1985. The PERQ 3A had an all-new hardware architecture based around a 12.5 MHz Motorola 68020 microprocessor and 68881 floating-point unit, plus two AMD 29116A 32-bit bit slice processors which acted as graphics co-processors. It also had up to 2 MB of RAM, a SCSI hard disk and was housed in a desktop "mini-tower"-style enclosure. The operating system was a port of UNIX System VRelease 2 called PNX 300. Prototype units were produced in 1985, but the project was cancelled before full production commenced (the project had run late and ICL decided it was a solution provider - it would sell Sun workstations as part of the solution).

 
Weide ST-M2V2

Weide ST-M2V2

This expansion board, sold by Weide Elektronik, provides an additional 512KB of RAM for the Atari ST.

 
NEC jubilee/Economatics Computer Interface

NEC jubilee/Economatics Computer Interface

This expansion board connects to the BBC Micro's user and analogue ports. It appears to be for use in an electronics lab or classroom environment. It provides the following features:

  • Two tactile button inputs
  • Eight DIP switch inputs
  • LED display of tactile/DIP switch states
  • Three analogue op-amps
  • One inverting schmitt trigger
  • Motor, with slotted disc interrupting an opto-isolator input
  • Connector for microphone input
  • Child board with three red, three green, and two amber LEDs. Connector is amrked "traffic light socket".
  • Off-board connectors for digital input/outputs and four analogue inputs.

While we have no documentation for this item, "NEC" is almost certainly not the PC manufacturer. Economatics were a UK company that supplied input/output control boxes and 'turtle' robots for Acorn (and later PC) computers.

 
Aleph One ARM3 Upgrade

Aleph One ARM3 Upgrade

This upgrade kit was produced by Aleph One Ltd in 1989. It upgrades the processor in an Acorn Archimedes from an ARM2 to a 60MHz ARM3. Also included were instructions for installing the upgrade, along with instructions for upgrading the system's memory controller to the MEMC1a chip - a required upgrade before the ARM3 CPU can be installed. Our copy of this manual is marked up with typographical corrections and may be a pre-release copy.

 
Amstrad DDI-1 / FD-1

Amstrad DDI-1 / FD-1

The Amstrad DDI-1 was sold as a set consisting of a DDI-1 (Disk Drive Interface) and an FD-1 3-inch disk drive. It also came with a CP/M 2.2 disk and license. This set was intended for the CPC-464 which did not come with a built-in 765 floppy disk controller.

The FD-1 disk drive was also sold seperately where it could be used as a secondary drive for the CPC-664, CPC-6128, and for the CPC-464 with DDI-1 attached.

 
Power Play Joystick Interface

Power Play Joystick Interface

This cartridge connects to the expansion port on a ZX Spectrumand allows the user to connect a single joystick.

 
RC2014

RC2014

The RC2014 is a kit computer based on the Z80 processor.  The Z80 was a highly popular processor used in 1970s and 1980s home computers, from which the RC2014 is based.

The RC2014 'is not a clone of anything specific, but there are suggestions of the ZX81, UK101, S100, Superboard II and Apple I...It nominally has 8K ROM, 32K RAM, runs at 7.3728MHz and communicates over serial at 115,200 baud.'  It was designed to allow for modular expansion, either with modules supplied by the makers of the RC2014 or with homemade additions.  It boots into Microsoft BASIC and can also be programmed with Z80 machine code.

Our RC2014 is complete in kit form with assembly instructions.  Also included is a trump card for the system, produced by the donor and designed to match the Home Computer Trump Cards sold through our shop.

Reference: http://rc2014.co.uk/, 16/07/2017.

 
RM Nimbus PC-486/66

RM Nimbus PC-486/66

This 1993 PC-compatible computer from Research Machines was powered by a 486 processor and shipped with up to 16MB of RAM. It typically shipped with a Mitsumi CD-ROM drive connected via a SoundBlaster expansion card.

 
Freecom Power CD

Freecom Power CD

This external CD-ROM drive connects via the PC's parallel port. Capable of reading discs recorded under the following formats:

  • MS-DOS CD-ROMs (High Sierra, Mode 1 and Mode 2 according to ISO9660)
  • CD-ROM XA
  • Kodak Photo-CD (single and multi-session)
  • Audio CDs can be played back and read from (with the appropriate software)

 
US Robotics Sportster Voice 28.8 Faxmodem

US Robotics Sportster Voice 28.8 Faxmodem

External serial modem, featuring:

  • Hardware based V.24/MNP 2-4 error control and V.42 bis/MNP 5 data compressions
  • Transmit speeds of up to 28,800bps with throughput to 115,200bps
  • Compatible with the following standards: V.34, V.32 bis, V.32, V.22 bis, Bell 212A/V.22, V.23, V.25, and Bell 103/V.21 modems
  • Useable with Class 1 or Class 2.0 fax software
  • Plug and play compatible
  • Useable as a full duplex speakerphone

 
RM Nimbus NB300

RM Nimbus NB300

This PC-compatible laptop from Research Machines shipped with up to 5MB of RAM.

 
Acorn Business Computer (ABC)

Acorn Business Computer (ABC)

The Acorn Business Computer (ABC) was a series of microcomputers announced at the end of 1983 by the British company Acorn Computers. The series of eight computers was aimed at the business, research and further education markets. However, the ABC range was cancelled before any of the models were shipped to customers. The ABC 210 was subsequently relaunched as the Acorn Cambridge Workstation, sold in modest numbers to academic and scientific users.

The ABC range was developed by Acorn essentially as a repackaged BBC Micro, expanded to 64 kB RAM, to which was added (in some models) a second processor and extra memory to complement the Micro's 6502. The electronics and disk drives were integrated into the monitor housing, with a separate keyboard.

The Zilog Z80, Intel 80286 and National Semiconductor 32016 were all used as second processors in the various models. Two of the eight models produced, the Personal Assistant and the Terminal, had no second processor.

 
Acorn System 4

Acorn System 4

he System 4 is disc-based computer housed in a double height rack with the capacity for up to 14 Eurocards. The minimum configuration is:

  • 1MHz 6502 CPU
  • VDU Interface
  • 16K RAM
  • Floppy disc controller with 2 floppy disc drives mounted in the top half of the rack.

This System 4 case contains some of the eurocards, but is missing the two disk drives that fit in the top rack. Also there is only an 8K static RAM card, and no Operating System in ROM.

 
Acorn System 5

Acorn System 5

The Acorn System 5 is a disc-based computer mounted in a card cage. The card cage can hold 10 cards and 2 floppy disc drives.

More information is available here.

 
Raspberry Pi Zero (packaged with MagPi magazine)

Raspberry Pi Zero (packaged with MagPi magazine)

Released at the end of 2015, the Raspberry Pi Zero is the smallest and cheapest computer in the Pi range.   It was launched at a retail price of just $5.  Our Pi Zero came free with Issue 40 of MagPi, the official magazine for the Raspberry Pi, which retailed at a cost of £5.99 - more expensive than the Zero itself.  It remains in that original packaging.

Specification:

  • 1GHz, Single-core CPU
  • 512MB RAM
  • Mini-HDMI port
  • Micro-USB OTG port
  • Micro-USB power
  • HAT-compatible 40-pin header
  • Composite video and reset headers
  • CSI camera connector (v1.3 only)

 
Kindle DX

Kindle DX

The Kindle DX was part of Amazon's Kindle range of e-readers.  E-readers first gained popularity in the mid-2000s and, by 2017, digital book sales have become an important part of the publishing market. 

 Display: 9.7" diagonal paper display with E Ink Pearl technology, 1200 x 824 pixel resolution at 150 ppi, 16-level gray scale, 10:1 contrast ratio.

Size: 10.4" x 7.2" x 0.38".

Weight: 18.9 ounces.

 
Apple iMac G3 (Tray Loading, Blue)

Apple iMac G3 (Tray Loading, Blue)

The iMac G3 was the first model of the iMac line of personal computers made by Apple Inc. (formerly Apple Computer, Inc.). The iMac G3 is an all-in-one, luggable personal computer, encompassing both the monitor and the CPU in a single enclosure. Originally released in striking bondi blue and later a range of brightly colored, translucent plastic, casings shipped with a keyboard and mouse in matching tints.

The company announced the iMac on 6th May 1998 and started shipping on 15th August 1998. The launch of the iMac was a landmark event for its time, and had a massive impact on both the company and the computer industry.
 
Our Model:Grape Imac Power PC G3
Power PC G3 233 MHz
512k cache/32MB
4GB Hard Drive
24X CD drive -tray loading
Rage Pro 6MB SGRAM

 

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