Latest Additions

Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

ICL Serial Peripheral Board

ICL Serial Peripheral Board

This 8-bit ISA expansion card from ICL appears to be some sort of serial communications board. The two large chips in the upper left are a Zilog serial communications controller and a custom ICL-specific LSI logic chip. The upper-right portion of the board has it's own ground plane and seems to be mostly analogue electronics with an RS485 interface chip. Any additional information about this item would be much appreciated.

Identifying marks:

  • 88808514 PRN 80093195 ICL (C) 1987 MLA04

 
Dreamcast Visual Memory Unit

Dreamcast Visual Memory Unit

"Visual Memory expands Dreamcast's gaming experience beyond the boundary of consoles. As well as being a memory cartridge, which allows you to save scores and game data from your Dreamcast, Visual Memory is a tiny portable games machine. Thanks to a liquid-crystal display on the front, you can load programs from your Dreamcast ont othe Visual Memory and play games on the move. Visual Memory slots into a wide variety of Dreamcast peripherals where the extra screen can display special game information. In addition, plugging two Visual Memory units together will allow you to share data between players."

 
DivMMC EnJOY! mint

DivMMC EnJOY! mint

The DivMMC EnJOY! mint is the little brother of the DivMMC EnJOY! interface. Unlike it's predecessor it lacks a case or joystick port. It features an NMI button for a break-in menu, as well as a reset button. It is  compatible with all Sinclair ZX Spectrum models: 16K, 48K, 48K+, 128K, +2, +2A, +2B, +3, and some clones. It is not compatible with the Spanish Investronica ZX Spectrum 128K.

 
Sinclair Spectrum with Homemade Keyboard

Sinclair Spectrum with Homemade Keyboard

This Sinclair Spectrum has had the standard keyboard replaced with a homemade cardboard and metal keyboard.

 
Papenmeier BrailleX Elba

Papenmeier BrailleX Elba

The BrailleX Elba is a combination braille display and keyboard.

 
Ferranti Memory Array 703897-D

Ferranti Memory Array 703897-D

Ferranti Memory Array, part number 703897-D. Serial number 540.

 
IBM MCA 5.25

IBM MCA 5.25" 360KB External Diskette Adapter

This adapter card plugs into a Microchannel bus slot and provides a DC-37F connector for an external 360KB 5.25" disk drive. It also has an edge connector which can be connected to a 'drive sled' adaptor for the internal drive bay.

Identifying marks:

  • IBM ASM P/N 72X6753
  • IBM FRU P/N 72X6758
  • IBM ASM P/N 72X6755

 
Opto-Transprocessor Exmem II Board

Opto-Transprocessor Exmem II Board

This 16-bit ISA expansion board for the PC features SIMM expansion memory and an IMST425-G25S 32-bit CMS microprocessor. The input/outputs ports suggest it was used for some form of video/image processing.

Identifying marks:

  • ASSY 6706394 SCHEM 6322949
  • OPTO-TRANSPROCESSOR EXMEM II

 
Owl Computers Owlmodem

Owl Computers Owlmodem

This expansion card from Owl Computers allows an Apple II to connect to remote computers over the public telephone network.

Identifying marks:

  • Owl Computers owlmodem 1981
  • Jeaborough Limited

 
IBM 64-256KB Memory Expansion

IBM 64-256KB Memory Expansion

This 8-bit ISA expansion card adds between 64KB and 256KB of RAM to an IBM-compatible PC. The RAM is added in four banks, with each bank consisting of eight memory chips to store data and one memory chip to store a parity bit.

Identifying marks:

  • 1501989 433 V0011
  • 5510003

 
Lung Hwa VGA Interface Card

Lung Hwa VGA Interface Card

This 16-bit ISA expansion card produced by Lung Hwa Electronics of Taiwan provides VGA graphic support with a maximum resolution of 1024x786 pixels.

Identifying marks:

  • S/N: 20912641
  • XP6676C
  • P/N 59-676C-0001 V1.0

 
Novell Ethernet Controller

Novell Ethernet Controller

This expansion board from Novell connects an ISA-bus PC to an Ethernet network using either a BNC connector or AUI connector.

Identifying marks:

  • BD #738-149-002 REV C
  • ASSY #810-149-002 REV D
  • 1092194

 
Unisys EISA Ethernet Controller

Unisys EISA Ethernet Controller

This expansion board connects to a PC via the EISA bus (typically used in server-class machines) and connects to an ethernet network using either BNC, AUI, or RJ11 connectors.

Identifying marks:

43601848-002 REV C

SLTN9418

J000FPSZ

 
CHI1012H Serial/Parallel Board

CHI1012H Serial/Parallel Board

This generic expansion board connects to a PC's ISA bus and provides one serial and one parallel port. On this board, the port are exposed on internal connectors instead of external D-sub connectors.

 
IBM 16/4 Short ISA Token Ring Adapter

IBM 16/4 Short ISA Token Ring Adapter

This half-length ISA expansion card allows a computer to be connected to a Token Ring local network.

Identifying marks:

  • 92F4554 ECC24968 V0011002830
  • IBM 53 5S 1914119990

 
Adaptec AHA-1510A

Adaptec AHA-1510A

This Adaptec expansion board allows the connection of SCSI disk drives to an ISA bus computer. The board itself can be populated as any of the 1510A, 1520A, or 1522A models. The different models are:

  • AHA-1510A: ISA-to-SCSI host adapter
  • AHA-1520A: ISA-to-SCSI host adapter with onboard BIOS
  • AHA-1522A: ISA-to-SCSI host adapter with onboard BIOS and floppy drive controller

This particular board is the mininal 1510A configuration.

Identifying marks:

  • AHA-1510A 555700 9521
  • ASSY 554006-02
  • FAB 554007-00 REV D
  • BA0E5210FYX

 
1PC-SATAR Expansion Board

1PC-SATAR Expansion Board

This PCI expansion board allows the connection of one serial ATA storage device, using either the internal or external connectors.

Identifying marks:

  • S/N: 89070100668
  • 1PC-SATAR-01.1

 
Princess Peach Amiibo

Princess Peach Amiibo

Amiibo is Nintendo's wireless communications and storage protocol, for use between figurines and the company's game consoles from the 3DS onwards.  Amiibo figures can provide new characters and abilities in game when placed near one of these consoles.

This item is the Princess Peach amiibo.  Peach is the main female character in Nintendo's Mario series of games.  The item was acquired for the Centre's Women in Gaming exhibition in October 2017.

 
Samus Amiibo

Samus Amiibo

Amiibo is Nintendo's wireless communications and storage protocol, for use between figurines and the company's game consoles from the 3DS onwards.  Amiibo figures can provide new characters and abilities in game when placed near one of these consoles.

This item is the Samus amiibo.  Samus is the star of Nintendo's Metroid series of games.  The item was acquired for the Centre's Women in Gaming exhibition in October 2017.

 
Zero Suit Samus Amiibo

Zero Suit Samus Amiibo

Amiibo is Nintendo's wireless communications and storage protocol, for use between figurines and the company's game consoles from the 3DS onwards.  Amiibo figures can provide new characters and abilities in game when placed near one of these consoles.

This item is the Zero Suit Samus amiibo.  Samus is the star of Nintendo's Metroid series of games, and the Zero Suit is the specialised bodysuit she wears beneath her armour.  The item was acquired for the Centre's Women in Gaming exhibition in October 2017.

 
Tomb Raider Lara Croft Action Figure

Tomb Raider Lara Croft Action Figure

An action figure of Tomb Raider heroine Lara Croft.  Containing action figure, monsters and guns, the figure was released in 1997, between Tomb Raider II and III, when the character was at the height of her fame.  This pack was purchased for the Centre's exhibition on Women in Gaming, October 2017.

 
Mario and Princess Peach 8-bit Figures

Mario and Princess Peach 8-bit Figures

Two figures complete in packaging of Mario and Princess Peach, inspired by their appearance in the game Super Mario Bros..  These figurines were available exclusively at San Diego Comic Con 2017 and were acquired by the Centre for use in our Women in Gaming exhibition, October 2017.

 
Team Dignitas Women's Jersey

Team Dignitas Women's Jersey

A female jersey for Team Dignitas, a professional e-sports team.  The team's all-female roster for the multiplayer shooter Counter-Strike: Global Offensive was featured during the Centre's exhibition on Women in Gaming, held in October 2017.

 
Commodore 64 C German

Commodore 64 C German

The Commodore 64 was one of the most succesful home computers in the world selling around 11-17 million units between 1982 to 1993!

There were several versions of the C64 from the original "Bull Nosed" style through to the later re-styled version and even versions produced specifically for the education market.

The C64 features 64 kilobytes of RAM with sound and graphics performance that were superior to IBM-compatible computers of that time. During the Commodore 64's lifetime (between 1982 and 1994), sales totalled around 17 million units. Part of its success was due to the fact that it was sold in retail stores instead of electronics stores, and that Commodore produced many of its parts in-house to control supplies and cost.

Approximately 10,000 commercial software titles were made for the Commodore 64 including development tools, office applications, and games. The machine is also credited with popularizing the computer demo scene. The Commodore 64 is still used today by some computer hobbyists, and emulators allow anyone with a modern computer to run these programs on their desktop.

The Commodore 64 C was released in 1986, and is cosmetically different to the original version, which is affectionately known as the bread bin, this was styled to fit more with the Amiga and C128 machines, there were also internal differences, such as revised SID and Vic chips.


 

 
IBM Token Ring Adapter

IBM Token Ring Adapter

Short-format MCA expansion card, designed to connect a PS/2 computer to a token ring network.

 
QLogic 64-bit PCI SCSI Controller

QLogic 64-bit PCI SCSI Controller

This expansion board connects through a 64-bit PCI connector and allows SCSI disk drives to be connected via intenral or external LVD connectors.

 
IBM SCSI/A Adapter

IBM SCSI/A Adapter

The SCSI Adapter is a 16-bit Micro Channel bus master adapter that features an 8.3MB per second burst data transfer rate, 16-bit data path with 32-bit address capabilities, and can be installed in either a 16- or 32-bit system card slot.

 
IBM MCA Dual Serial Board

IBM MCA Dual Serial Board

This expansion board for the IBM PS/2 connects via the MCA bus and expands the computer's I/O capabilities with an additional two serial ports (9-pin D-subminiature).

Identifying text:

  • IBM FRU 34F0008
  • FCC ID AN09SA6450347 IBM
  • 33F8702 55Q C00866 2128

 
HITACHI CD-ROM Adapter

HITACHI CD-ROM Adapter

This expansion board connects to an IBM PS/2 computer through the MCA bus. It allows the user to attach a Hitachi CD-ROM drive using a proprietary external 37-pin D-subminiature interface. Unusually, despite being designed for an MCA bus the card has a label indicating that it is only compatible with MS-DOS 3.1, 3.2, or 3.3 on an IBM PS/2 model 50, 60, or 80. It explicitly states that it is not compatible with OS/2. An ADF options file is required for the card to be configured in the PS/2 setup menu (attached).

 
MyComp MGP Expansion Board

MyComp MGP Expansion Board

This expansion board by the Taiwan-based fir MyComp combines a monochrome text-mode display adaptor and parallel printer port. It is a compatible replacement for the IBM MDA expansion option.

Identifying text:

  • S/N: 8901019958
  • FCC ID: FHG5UA-MGP

 
3Com EtherLink/MC TP

3Com EtherLink/MC TP

This micro-channel expansion card allows an IBM PS/2 computer to be connected to an Ethernet network using either an RJ11 jack or Media Attachment Unit.

 
3Com EtherLink/MC

3Com EtherLink/MC

This micro-channel expansion card allows an IBM PS/2 computer to be attached to an Ethernet network using either a BNC connector ('thinnet') or a Media Attachment Unit ('thicknet').

Identifying marks:

  • 3Com EtherLink/MC
  • (C) 1987 3Com MADE IN USA 4233-02 REV A
  • NETWORK ADDRESS 02608C-864138
  • Z55210 ELNK/MC
  • FAB P/N 4245-01 REV A
  • The rear of the PCB also has the designer's names included in the copper mask:
    • Kap Sah
    • Gary Wang
    • Carol Sikes
    • Pamela Black
    • Richard Hausman
    • Jack Moses
    • Brian Petersen
    • Henry Ohab
    • Dennis Rivera
    • David Schwartz
    • Vafha Shay

 
NCR Network Adapter

NCR Network Adapter

This micro-channel adapter allows an IBM PS/2 computer to be attached to a network. We are uncertain whether this is a token ring or Ethernet MAU connection.

 
Ungermann-Bass Ethernet Adapter

Ungermann-Bass Ethernet Adapter

This micro-channel expansion board allows an IBM PS/2 to connect to an Ethernet network using either an RJ11 jack or a Media Attachment Unit (MAU). It uses an Intel 80186 microprocessor to process network data.

Identifying marks:

  • UNGERMANN-BASS ASSY 31611-04

 
Ungermann-Bass Ethernet Adapter

Ungermann-Bass Ethernet Adapter

This micro-channel expansion board allows an IBM PS/2 to connect to an Ethernet network using either an RJ11 jack or a Media Attachment Unit (MAU). It uses an Intel 80186 microprocessor to process network data.

Identifying marks:

  • UNGERMANN-BASS ASSEMBLED IN HONG KONG
  • ASSY 33357-03

 
Madge Networks MCA Ring Node Adapter

Madge Networks MCA Ring Node Adapter

This Micro-Channel expansion board allows an IBM PS/2 computer to be connected to a token ring network.

Identifying marks:

  • (C) 1987 MADGE NETWORKS LTD
  • MCA RING NODE
  • 154-001 ISSUE B

 
Compaq EOB003 SCSI Controller

Compaq EOB003 SCSI Controller

This expansion board connected to a computer via IBM's Microchannel bus. It allows the connection of two SCSI storage devices using either internal or external connectors.

Identifying marks:

  • 2 CAHNNEL LVD/1 CHANNEL SE SCSI CONTROLLER
  • COMPAQ SERIES EOB003
  • BOARD NO. 010096-001 A/W REV C FAB REV C

 
Digital Microsystems DMS816

Digital Microsystems DMS816

Dumb Terminal

 
Commodore 64 C

Commodore 64 C

The Commodore 64 was one of the most succesful home computers in the world selling around 11-17 million units between 1982 to 1993!

There were several versions of the C64 from the original "Bull Nosed" style through to the later re-styled version and even versions produced specifically for the education market.

The C64 features 64 kilobytes of RAM with sound and graphics performance that were superior to IBM-compatible computers of that time. During the Commodore 64's lifetime (between 1982 and 1994), sales totalled around 17 million units. Part of its success was due to the fact that it was sold in retail stores instead of electronics stores, and that Commodore produced many of its parts in-house to control supplies and cost.

Approximately 10,000 commercial software titles were made for the Commodore 64 including development tools, office applications, and games. The machine is also credited with popularizing the computer demo scene. The Commodore 64 is still used today by some computer hobbyists, and emulators allow anyone with a modern computer to run these programs on their desktop.

The Commodore 64 C was released in 1986, and is cosmetically different to the original version, which is affectionately known as the bread bin, this was styled to fit more with the Amiga and C128 machines, there were also internal differences, such as revised SID and Vic chips.


 

 
Commodore 64 C Hollywood Presents Pack

Commodore 64 C Hollywood Presents Pack

The Commodore 64 was one of the most succesful home computers in the world selling around 11-17 million units between 1982 to 1993!

There were several versions of the C64 from the original "Bull Nosed" style through to the later re-styled version and even versions produced specifically for the education market.

The C64 features 64 kilobytes of RAM with sound and graphics performance that were superior to IBM-compatible computers of that time. During the Commodore 64's lifetime (between 1982 and 1994), sales totalled around 17 million units. Part of its success was due to the fact that it was sold in retail stores instead of electronics stores, and that Commodore produced many of its parts in-house to control supplies and cost.

Approximately 10,000 commercial software titles were made for the Commodore 64 including development tools, office applications, and games. The machine is also credited with popularizing the computer demo scene. The Commodore 64 is still used today by some computer hobbyists, and emulators allow anyone with a modern computer to run these programs on their desktop.

The Commodore 64 C was released in 1986, and is cosmetically different to the original version, which is affectionately known as the bread bin, this was styled to fit more with the Amiga and C128 machines, there were also internal differences, such as revised SID and Vic chips.

This machine is in a Hollywood Presents Pack with a compilation of Ocean games, which includes Rambo II, Miami Vice, Top Gun, Platoon and the Great Escape, also has a datasette unit for loading.

 

 
Microframe 12

Microframe 12

In 1983 Tycom Corporation introduced the Tycom Microframe, heralded at the time as the "first fourth-generation computer".

The computer at the core was an Intel Corp. 8088-based multiuser system that had a performance range extending from a mid-range microcomputer to a high-end minicomputer of the time.

Described by some observers of the London computer scene as "future proof," Microframe contained a vendor-developed bus architecture called Versatile Base Bus Connect (VBC) that enabled its chassis, which was available in 6-, 12- and 22-slot versions, to accommodate Zilog Z80, Motorola 68000 and Digital Equipment Corp. PDP-11/70 board-level upgrades. The main Intel 8088 processor ran Microsoft MS-DOS, and the hosted CPU boards allowed the system to run other operating systems including CP/M (on the Z80) and Xenix (on the 68000 board).

 
Sage IV (Enclosed Model)

Sage IV (Enclosed Model)

The Sage IV came out in 1983, a year later than the Sage II. The Sage IV used the same CPU logic board as the Sage II and added a second board that sat atop the first board and connected via the system bus connectors. This second PCB contained another 512 KB of DRAM, four serial ports for supporting more simultaneous users, and a winchester controller connecting to either a 5 MB or 40 MB hard disk.

One of two Sage IV in our collection, this model has a sticker on the front labelling it as machine 89, it has a DEC service slip on the top, with Tag E212.

The machine unlike the other model IV, is closed at the front and back, and has the main board higher up.

 
Sage II (Converted to a Model IV)

Sage II (Converted to a Model IV)

The Sage II was a 68000-based computer produced by Sage Technology of Reno, Nevada in 1982. The machine ran a multi-user version of the UCSD p-System IV.

Specifications:

  • CPU: Motorola 68000 at 8MHz
  • 512KB DRAM
  • One or two 5.25" floppy drives
  • Serial port (for modem)
  • Parallel port (for printer)
  • IEEE 488 port

 
IBM PS/2 Model 50

IBM PS/2 Model 50

Base Unit and Keyboard Only

 
IBM Personal Computer 730 - P75

IBM Personal Computer 730 - P75

The IBM PC 700 series systems used an Intel Pentium processor with clock frequencies of 75, 90, 100, 133 and 166 MHz. Initial systems had selectable bus architecture (SelectaBus) through a replaceable riser-card. Options were either PCI/ISA or PCI/MCA. The ISA or MCA bus would be connected to the PCI bus using a PCI to ISA/MCA bridge. The advantage of this is that even operating systems without MCA support worked on the system, as long as the MCA portion was not required.

 
Apple Power Macintosh 7200/90

Apple Power Macintosh 7200/90

The 7200 was introduced alongside the Power Macintosh 7500 and 8500 at the 1995 MacWorld Expo in Boston.[1] Apple referred to these machines collectively as the "Power Surge" line, communicating that these machines offered a significant speed improvement over its predecessors. Introduced as a successor to the Power Macintosh 7100, the 7200 represents the low end of this generation of Power Macintosh, which replaced NuBus with PCI. It was introduced at the same time as the Power Macintosh 8500 and the Power Macintosh 7500. With the latter, it also shares the novel "Outrigger" case. Unlike the 7500, however, the 7200 does not have video input capabilities, It was launched at processor speeds of 75 and 90 MHz, and the slower model was replaced by a 120 MHz model in February 1996. The 120MHz model was also available in a "PC compatible" variant, which came with a PCI card that allowed the computer to run Microsoft Windows and other PC operating systems. The card featured a 100 MHz Pentium processor.

 
HP Vectra 05/20

HP Vectra 05/20

Model : 01430A

 
Victor Vi

Victor Vi

The Victor Vi, possibly known as the Sirius Vi in the UK, has two slots for 5.25'' Disks, and a 10 MB hard drive, other models included the 3021, which had a 20 MB hard drive and the 3031, which had a 30 MB HD.

 
Going Places

Going Places

Hospital for sick children Gt Ormond Street

 
Apple Super Serial Card II

Apple Super Serial Card II

This expansion card for the Apple II provides one serial communications port.

 
Amitar A500+ Memory Expansion

Amitar A500+ Memory Expansion

This expansion board for the A500+ allows you to add up to four SIMM memory modules to your Amiga.

 
Dreamcast Visual Memory Unit (US)

Dreamcast Visual Memory Unit (US)

This Dreamcast Visual Memory unit (VMU) in transparent green is for US (NTSC) systems.

 
Microbee Premium Plus

Microbee Premium Plus

The Microbee Premium Plus is a hybrid kit computer. The baseboard (which has the keyboard, Z80 CPU, PIO, 6545 screen controller and video circuits) is supplied in kit form with comprehensive assembly instructions, and the coreboard is pre-assembled using mostly surface mount technology. it is, effectively, an updated version of the original Microbee computer. The new coreboard design includes floppy disk emulation and storage via SDcard. There is also an ethernet port and high speed serial (RS232) port. There is also another microprocessor on the new coreboard and it has been configured to make the Premium Plus a true dual processor computer.

More information can be found here.

 
IBM Monochrome Display Adapter

IBM Monochrome Display Adapter

The IBM monochrome display adapter ('MDA') was one of two display adapters offered with the IBM Personal Computer. It used a 6845 CRT controller and 4KB of RAM to implement a 40x80 text mode display capable of two levels of intensity, bold, and underline effects. No graphics modes were supported, but as IBM expected it to be primarily purchased by business users it did include a parallel printer port. It's RAM and I/O ports were deliberately mapped to different locations than the CGA graphics card, allowing the MDA to be used simultaneously with a colour graphics board.

 
Amiga Action Replay Mk III

Amiga Action Replay Mk III

Amiga Action Replay plugs into the expansion port of the Amiga A500 and allows the user to freeze any program or activate slow-motion mode. By Datel.

 
Pioneer PX-TB7 Tablet

Pioneer PX-TB7 Tablet

The Pioneer PX-TB7 tablet connects to any MSX computer (and was designed specifically for Pioneer's PX-7 model) to allow user input using a pen.

 
Sage IV (Open Model)

Sage IV (Open Model)

The Sage IV came out in 1983, a year later than the Sage II. The Sage IV used the same CPU logic board as the Sage II and added a second board that sat atop the first board and connected via the system bus connectors. This second PCB contained another 512 KB of DRAM, four serial ports for supporting more simultaneous users, and a winchester controller connecting to either a 5 MB or 40 MB hard disk.

One of two Sage IV in our collection, this model has a sticker on the front labelling it as machine 89, it has a DEC service slip on the top, with Tag E212.

The machine unlike the other model IV, is open at the front and back, and has the main board lower down.

 

Founding Sponsors
redgate Google ARM Real VNC Microsoft Research
Heritage Lottery Funded
Heritage Lottery Fund