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Some of our latest additions are shown below - clicking on the link will take you to the items main page and will also show any further photographs.

Commodore LC5K Calculator

Commodore LC5K Calculator

The Commodore LC5K is an arithmetic calculator with 8 digits precision and algebraic logic. It has 7 functions, 24 keys and one of the early LCD (liquid crystal) displays which incorporated a yellow filter. The power source is 2x1.5V cell.

 
Casio Digital Diary SF-4300A

Casio Digital Diary SF-4300A

  • Telephone directory
  • Schedule (with schedule alarm)
  • Memorandum
  • Reminder
  • Calendar
  • Home time and world time
  • Data communications

 
The Apprentice

The Apprentice

Perhaps the most appropriately named software title that we have in the collection, where the Amstrad range is concerned, The Apprentice of course is not based on the much later TV series starring Lord Sugar, but rather a wet round the ears Sorcerer's apprentice, who needs saving from all the blundering spells he has unleashed upon his master's abode.

 

 
Saisho DR10 Datacorder

Saisho DR10 Datacorder

Computer program data recorder with monitor function.

Serial number 96906544.

 
Network NW900 Cassette Recorder

Network NW900 Cassette Recorder

Serial number 189987.

 
6502 Assembler/Machine Code Monitor for the VIC-20

6502 Assembler/Machine Code Monitor for the VIC-20

  • 6502 assembler on Vickit 5.
  • Hi-speed cassette operations machine code monitor from Vickit 4.

 
VIC-20 16K Memory Expansion Cartridge

VIC-20 16K Memory Expansion Cartridge

A 16K RAM cartridge for the Commodore VIC-20 coomputer. This was required to run some larger games, including Jetpack.

 
Amstrad CPC 464 Plus

Amstrad CPC 464 Plus

The CPC 464plus model was intended as "more sophisticated and stylish" replacements for the CPC464. The 464plus has 64KB RAM and a cassette tape drive.

The plus range is not equipped with an on-board ROM, and thus the 464plus and the 6128plus do not contain a firmware. Instead, Amstrad provided the firmware for both models via the ROM extension facility, contained on the included Burnin' Rubber and Locomotive BASIC cartridge. This resulted in reduced hardware localization cost (only some select key caps and case labels had to be localized) with the added benefit of a rudimentary copy protection mechanism (without a firmware present, the machine itself could not copy a game cartridge's content).

Our CPC 464 is in excellent condition and has the Serial No: 532-0909050.

 
Wild Vision BBC Micro Chromalock

Wild Vision BBC Micro Chromalock

This genlock board for the BBC Micro allows video overlay.

 
Amstrad CM14 Monitor

Amstrad CM14 Monitor

This was the colour monitor sold together with the CPC464plus/CPC6128plus computers.

It was also available as an option to the GX4000 video console.

Our CM14 is in it's original box.

 
SuperPad 64 Plus

SuperPad 64 Plus

Developed by InterAct Game Products. For use with the Nintendo 64 game console.

  • Five fire buttons and view control
  • Analog joystick
  • Slow motion function
  • Auto-fire function
  • Mmeory card slot
  • Eight-way digital directional control

 
JoyTech Advanced Jolt Pack 2-in-1

JoyTech Advanced Jolt Pack 2-in-1

  • Both a memory card and jolt pack combined
  • Copatible with Nintendo rumble pack
  • Memory card compatible with N64 games
  • Save and restore game data
  • Save up to 123 pages of data

 
Memotech MTX512

Memotech MTX512

The Memotech MTX512 was a Z80-based home computer released by Memotech in 1983-1984. While not fully compatible with the MSX series of computers, they were technically very similar. The MTX512 had 64KB RAM. The MTX512 supported plug-in ROM boards.

 
Memotech MTX500

Memotech MTX500

The Memotech MTX500 was a Z80-based home computer released by Memotech in 1983-1984. While not fully compatible with the MSX series of computers, they were technically very similar. The MTX500 had 64KB RAM. The MTX500 supported plug-in ROM boards.

 
Acorn Stork Notebook

Acorn Stork Notebook

The Stork was a prototype notebook designed by Acorn in 1996. Very few were made, mainly to be used as demoonstrator units to third-parties who would license the design. The Stork was never produced commercially.

Our Stork has serial number STK14 and was kindly donated by Chris Whytehead. More information can be found at his website.

 
Burroughs C3260 Electronic Calculator

Burroughs C3260 Electronic Calculator

This is Burroughs' rebranding (OEM copy from) the Sharp EL-160 electronic calculator. Introduced in 1971, it was marketed in America and Europe.

It is a basic four-function, 8 digit floating decimal calculator with memory (or double-precision, depending on a mode switch).

It uses individual Itron vacuum fluorescent display tubes for the display. Itron tubes use a unique segmented pattern to create digits that look more handwritten than the traditional 7-segment digit rendition.

 

Using the calculator:

To multiply, the first number is entered, followed by the [÷X]" key, then the second number is typed in, followed by the [+=] key to calculate the product.

The same sequence is used for division, but rather than pressing the [+=] key, the red key (with Burroughs' unusual "dot = dot" nomenclature) is pressed to perform the division.

The keyboard panel has two slide switches to control the operational mode of the machine. The upper-most switch, with positions labeled "MEM" and "16", is used to select the operating mode of the machine.

 

The 'MEM' and '16' slide-switch:

The Burroughs C3260 has two operating modes.

'MEM'provides a memory accumulator, with a key to add the display to the memory [+], and one to recall the current content of the memory register to the display (diamond shape).

"16" uses the memory register as a double-precision register, allowing results of multiplication and division operations to return answers up to 16 significant digits in length. In this mode, when a result is greater than 8 significant digits, the display shows the upper eight significant digits of the result upon completion of the calculation. The [diamond] key can then be pressed to display the lower eight digits of the result. When the lowest digits are being displayed, a single press of the [C] key will return the upper-most digits of the answer to the display.

In "16" mode, the [+] key has no function. This double-precision mode is good only for use on single calculations...chain calculations in this mode result in the low part of the answer being lost, and answers that are of limited use.

 

The 'CM' slide-switch (clear memory):

The second slide switch is a momentary contact switch, used when the calculator is in "MEM" mode to clear the memory register. Sliding the switch downward to the "CM" position and releasing it causes the memory register to be set to zero.

 

Other details:

Serial No: C-034672-101

Volts: 240

Amps: 0.025

Watts: 7

C/S: 50/60

Dimensions: 254x159x89 mm

 Made in Japan

 
Iyonix PC

Iyonix PC

The Iyonix PC was sold by Castle Technology and Iyonix Ltd from 2002. It used standard PC-compatible hardware but ran RISC OS 5 (developed from source code licensed by Pace for set-top boxes). Development of the Iyonix PC was initially carried out in secret under the codename Tungsten. The Iyonix was the first major redesign of the RISC OS platform since the RISC PC was introduced in 1993.

The Iyonix had PCI and USB expansion ability, and also kept the ability to use the legacy "podule" cards. Unlike Acorn's Phoebe machine, no attempt was made to retain compatability with VIDC or 26-bit mode. The Iyonix is believed to be the first shipping computer to use Intel's XScale processor.

Production of the Iyonix PC ceased in 2006 following the introduction of RoHS regulations. Castle Technologies stopped taking orders for the Iyonix on 25 September 2008.

Our Iyonix PC is complete with original box, keyboard, and manuals. It has serial number IY01100939.

 
Cheetah 32K RAM Expansion

Cheetah 32K RAM Expansion

This expansion unit for the Sinclair ZX81 adds another 32K of RAM.

 
Olympia People

Olympia People

The Olympia People microcomputer system was released in the late eighties by Olympia International and was intended to be used as a general-purpose office microcomputer.

Specifications:

  • 8086 16-bit processor.
  • 128KB DRAM as standard; upgradable to 512KB.
  • Dual double-sided, double-density 5.25" disk drives. Total disc capacity 655KB (80 tracks, 16 sectors/track, 256 bytes/sector).
  • Monochrome green-screen monitor with four intensity levels. Text and graphics mode supported.
  • Detachable keyboard with programmable function keys and ASCII/national character support.
  • RS-232 serial port
  • Parallel printer port
  • ROM diagnostics and monitor program

The People is designed to run both CP/M-86 and MS-DOS 2.00.

Aftermarket options available included a 20MB Winchester hard disc; a high-resolution colour monitor; and a GPIB interface board.

Our Olympia People has been upgraded to the maximum 512KB memory.

 
HP-41CX

HP-41CX

The HP-41 series of calculators were the first to add alphanumeric input to simplify the programming of HP's increasingly sophisticated progrgammable calculators. The CX variant included by default the Time module (stopwatch plus clock with alarms), an Extended Functions / Extended Memory module, a text editor, and some additional functions.

 
Sord DR-5 Personal Data Recorder

Sord DR-5 Personal Data Recorder

This cassette recorder is specially designed for storing computer programs and data. Fast-forward, cue, rewind, and review are independent functions of the computer. Features one-key recording.

Our DR-5 has serial number 30738321 and is in it's original box.

 
16k Memory Expansion for the Mattel Aquarius

16k Memory Expansion for the Mattel Aquarius

A 16k Memory Expansion module for the Mattel Aquarius computer.
 
New and unused, still sealed.

 
Stonechip Electronics Echo Amplifier

Stonechip Electronics Echo Amplifier

This accessory for the Spectrum amplifies the audio signal produced by a Spectrum and plays it through a speaker. Saving and loading to cassette can be acomplished without switching leads due to the save/load/beep switch. An audible cue facility allows recorded tapes to be quickly searched.

 
Superbrain JR

Superbrain JR

The Superbrain II JR was a variant of the Interac Superbrain II. It shipped with 170KB disc drives.

 
Interton Electronic PIC 9000

Interton Electronic PIC 9000

The Interton Electronic PIC 9000 is a non-programmable calculator from the 1970's. Three slots on the bottom of the machine allow modules to be inserted allowing additional features, such as conversion tables or word translation.

 
Casio fx-180P

Casio fx-180P

The Casio fx-180p is a programmable calculator offering 38 merged program steps, plus six registers.

 
HP 32E

HP 32E

Introduced in 1978, the HP 32E was a non-programmable calculator that offered statistical functions and additional registers over the lower-end 30-series models.

 
Sega Dreamcast Gun

Sega Dreamcast Gun

The official Sega light gun for the Dreamcast. Not released in the US due to concerns about bad publicity following the Columbine High School shootings.

 
Miniscribe B438

Miniscribe B438

This 'hardcard' is designed to be placed inside a standard PC and is essentially a standard Miniscribe hard disk bolted onto a controller card.

 
Ram Electronics Music Machine

Ram Electronics Music Machine

A digital sound sampling and playback device. The Music Machine was designed by Flare Technology and manufactured by RAM Electronics. The Amstrad CPC version is almost identical to the the ZX Spectrum version, only difference was the address decoding logic.

 
Dk'tronics Speech Synth

Dk'tronics Speech Synth

Dk'tronics Speech Synthesizer based on SPO256-AL2 chip.

 
Psion Serial Link for Apple Macintosh

Psion Serial Link for Apple Macintosh

The serial link for Apple Macintosh consists of:

  • A 3Link cable (for Psion Series 3 and 3a) to connect you Psion to Apple Macintosh computers.
  • Psion Link software for Apple Macintosh computers which allows you to control the transfer of files between your Psion and Apple Macintosh on the Apple Macintosh.
  • MCLINK software whic hallows you to access and transfer files on you Apple Macintosh from your Psion.
  • COMMS application for Psion Series 3 and Series 3a computers; housed in the 3Link cable, it provides terminal emulation (for connecting you Psion to another computer directly or via a modem) for data access and exchange. Protocols supported: XMODEM and YMODEM.

 
Psion Infrared Printer Link

Psion Infrared Printer Link

The infrared printer link enables you to print from your Psion machine to a printer without using a cable. The infrared printer link uses one 9V PP3 battery.

 
Psion Series 3 Parallel Link

Psion Series 3 Parallel Link

Links the Psion Series 3 with any standard parallel printer.

 
Tadpole P1000G

Tadpole P1000G

The P1000G is a 100MHz Pentium PCI local bus laptop manufactured by Tadpole Technology.

List prices for the P1000 configured with 8MB DRAM, a 340MB hard drive, Windows for Workgroups 3.11 and DOS 6.22, Phoenix BIOS with Plug & Play, an external floppy drive, internal NiMH battery and leather carrying case start at $6,495.

 
Sony PTM-064V 64KB RAM Card

Sony PTM-064V 64KB RAM Card

This 64KB battery-backed RAM card is designed for use with the PTC-500 Palmtop computer.

 
Sinclair ZX Printer

Sinclair ZX Printer

The Sinclair ZX Printer is a spark printer which was produced by Sinclair Research for its ZX81 home computer. It was launched in 1981, with a recommended retail price of £49.95.

The ZX Printer used special 4-inch (100 mm) wide black paper which was supplied coated with a thin layer of aluminium. To mark the paper, one of the printer's two styluses passed a current through a small area of the aluminium layer, causing the aluminium to evaporate and reveal the black under-surface. The printer's horizontal resolution was the same as the ZX81's video display, i.e. 256 dots (pixels) or 32 characters (using the standard character definition). The print quality was crude, but no other printer was compatible with the ZX81 without the use of additional software and interface hardware.

The ZX Printer was also compatible with the earlier ZX80 computer (when fitted with the 8kB ROM upgrade) and the later ZX Spectrum, and plugged directly into the expansion bus connector via a short cable. The expansion bus was duplicated on the outside of the printer's connector, allowing other peripherals to be connected concurrently. The printer drew its power directly from the expansion bus, and was sold with a larger (1-2A) power supply for the ZX81 to accommodate the additional power drain. The Spectrum's user manual noted that this was not needed for the Spectrum as its default 1.1A power supply was sufficient.

 
Hewlett Packard HP-16C Programmer's Calculator

Hewlett Packard HP-16C Programmer's Calculator

Sold between 1982 and 1989, this was HP's only calculator designed to be used by programmers. It could display numbers in decimal, hexadecimal, octal, or binary. Numbers wider than the LCD display were displayed in a 'windowed' format, with the visible digits able to be shifted left and right.

The calculator was configurable to match the computer the user was currently working with. The word size could be set to anywhere from 1 to 64 bits, with maths being perfomed in either unsigned, ones-complement, or twos-complement format.

Floating point calculations could be performed, wirth two conversion algorithms to convert between the HP-16C floating point format and the (not yet standard) IEEE format.

As well as the 'standard' calculator functions, the HP-16C also provided some specialised features designed for computer users:

  • Shift functions: left and right, arithmetic and regular.
  • Rotate functions: by multiple positions in either direction, optionally through the carry bit.
  • Left justify the bits of a word.
  • Masking: Create masks to mask left or right N bits.
  • #B: returned number of bits set in a word.
  • Bitwise Logic: and, or, not, xor; also bit setting and testing.

 
Suncom Analog Edge Joystick

Suncom Analog Edge Joystick

This joystick is switchable between IBM and Apple modes. it also has an additional switch for choosing between "Fire Button/Selector". The cable ends in a DA-15 connector.

 
Voltmace Delta-Cat Joystick Mouse Eliminator

Voltmace Delta-Cat Joystick Mouse Eliminator

This joystick plugs into the Archimedes mosue port and repalces it as a pointing device.

 
LocoLink for Windows

LocoLink for Windows

LocoLink for Windows allows you to transfer files from any UK model Amstrad PC to an IBM-compatible PC. An adapter cable connects from the PCW expansion port to the PC parallel printer port; the included software handles file transfer and can also convert LocoScript documents to PC formats.

System Requirements

  • Any UK Amstrad PCW (8256, 8512, 9512, 9256, 9512+, and PcW 10)
  • Any IBM PC suitable for running Windows
  • MS DOS 3.3 or later and Windows 3.1 or later
  • Parallel printer port for using the LocoLink cable
  • One 3.5" or one 5.25" disc drive

Original box with cable, PCW software disc, and user guide.

 
Tadpole Voyager IIi

Tadpole Voyager IIi

The Tadpole Voyager IIi is a portable Solaris server. It has two removable drive caddies, each taking laptop drives. The 360MHz UltraSPARC IIi processor is paired with 512MB of RAM.

 
BBC Master ROM/RAM Cartridge Card

BBC Master ROM/RAM Cartridge Card

This modern cartridge card for the BBC Master allows you to load up to eight 16KB ROM images into battery-backed RAM. The ROM images can be switched without removing the card by using the toggle switches. There is also a socket to allow an external ROM to be fitted.

Kindly donated by Chris Whytehead. Further details for available here.

 
LTM Portable

LTM Portable

The LTM Portable is a 'luggable' BBC Master, with built-in monochrome CRT monitor and dual disk drives. It runs off mains power.

Kindly donated by Chris Whytehead - further details, including photographs of the internals, are available here.

 
Sony Palmtop PTC-500

Sony Palmtop PTC-500

Released in Japan in 1990, this is one of Sony's earliest portable computers. It features handwriting recognition, although the stylus is connected via a wire.

 
Sony Magic Link PIC-1000

Sony Magic Link PIC-1000

The Magic Link was a personal communicator and PDA marketed by Sony from 1994, based on the General Magic's Magic Cap operating system. The "Link" part of the name refers to the device's ability to send and receive data over a modem.

 
Kyocera Refalo KX-1601

Kyocera Refalo KX-1601

The Kyocera Refalo is a personal organiser shaped like a Filofax. It can hold standard Filofac pages. The 240x320 greyscale screen is touch-sensitive. Handwriting recognition can be used to enter text; alternatively a keyboard 'page' can be inserted into the binder and is powered through induction.

The processor is an NEC V30 and runs an MS-DOS variant. There are two PCMCIA slots available as well as an RS-232 jack and speaker output.

The Refalo was only sold in Japan.

Kindly donated by Mik Lamming.

 
DaynaTALK PC Card

DaynaTALK PC Card

This full-length PC ISA card allows you to connect a standard PC to an Apple LocalTalk network.

 
TRS-80 Color Mouse

TRS-80 Color Mouse

This mouse connects to the TRS-80 Color Computer.

 
Open University Hektor Peripheral Board

Open University Hektor Peripheral Board

The PT502 Peripheral Board connects to the Open University Hektor single-board computer and provides a variety of input and output devices. The available peripherals are:

  • Four switches
  • Four LEDs
  • Speaker with variable volume
  • Incandescant lamps
  • Thermister connected to an ADC
  • Motor connected to fan and optical speed sensor

 
Intel 80287XL Numeric Processing Unit

Intel 80287XL Numeric Processing Unit

This coprocessor works alongside an 80287 CPU to provide floating-point support. The XL was the second '287 model to be released and was introduced in 1990. Implemented in CMOS instead of NMOS, it uses less power than it's predecessor. Internally the XL is actually based on the '387 core and therefore supports full IEEE 754 compatibility, as well being ~50% faster than the older '287 chip.

 
Dual Power Supply for BBC Micro Disc Drives

Dual Power Supply for BBC Micro Disc Drives

This mains power supply allows you to power two BBC Micro disc drives (or other peripherals that use a compatible plug).

 
Open University Hektor I

Open University Hektor I

The Hektor (sometimes known as the PT502, although this is actually the course number) was a single board computer used by the Open University to teach electronic and engineer students how to design and build a microcomputer. On completing the course the computer was to be returned to the Open University.

Our Hektor is in it's original box with course booklets, user manual, experimentation notes, and University correspondence.

 
HP-97 Calculator

HP-97 Calculator

The HP-97 programmable calculator was introduced in 1976. It was the most powerful calculator HP had produced so far. It featured a program memory of 224 eight-bit words. Programs could include up to 20 labels, 3 levels of subroutines, four flag registers, 8 comparison functions, and extended index and loop control functions. Programs could be saved onto magnetic strip cards for later use.

Our HP-97 was kindly donated by Mike Young, and is complete with:

  • HP-97 calculator
  • HP carry case
  • 5 spare rolls of thermal paper (boxed)
  • Spare battery (boxed)
  • Battery charger (boxed)
  • Mains supply
  • Two boxes of blank program cards (120 each)
  • Owner's handbook and programming guide
  • Applications and accessories list
  • HP-97 Standard Pac manual
  • Program cards and usage instructions from Shell Nigeria

 
Cheetah Sweet Talker

Cheetah Sweet Talker

This accessory for the ZX Spectrum provided speech synthesis, poorly.

 
Sega Master System Light Phaser

Sega Master System Light Phaser

Serial number C7520385.

 
Casio VL-Tone

Casio VL-Tone

The VL-1 was the first instrument of Casio's VL-Tone product line, and is sometimes referred to as the VL-Tone. It combined a calculator, synthesizer, and sequencer. Released in 1980 and selling for around $150, the VL-1 is notable for its kitsch value among electronic musicians, due to its cheap construction and its unrealistic, uniquely low-fidelity sounds.

Its sounds were mostly composed of filtered squarewaves with varied pulse-widths. Its piano, violin, flute and guitar timbres were nearly unrecognizable abstractions of real instruments. It also featured a "fantasy" voice, and a programmable synthesizer which provided for choice of both oscillator waveform and ADSR envelope. The synthesizer was programmed by entering a number into the calculator section's memory, then switching back to keyboard mode. It had a range of two and a halfoctaves.

The VL-1 featured a small LCD display capable of displaying 8 characters. This was primarily used for the calculator function, but also displayed notes played. As well as this, the VL-1 also had changeable tone and balance, basic tempo settings and a real-time monophonic music sequencer, which could play back up to 99 notes. There were also 10 pre-loaded rhythms which utilized just three basic drum sounds.

 

 
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