Things are tough right now ...

They're tough for everyone :( But when coronavirus hit here in the UK, the museum had to close its doors to the public, and we lost practically all our income overnight.

Please Donate Via Just GivingNo visitors, no workshops, no events, no school visits... no income. We know that things are tough for everyone right now, but if you can afford to help us through these tough times please donate what you can.

There's over 36,000 exhibits here! That should keep you occupied for a bit - get searching!

Or come and get involved on our social media channels ...

      Twitch  Facebook          Online Gift Shop      

Thank you.

Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) (US)

This US variant of the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) outputs NTSC and runs at 60Hz instead of the 50Hz of the European machines (17.5% faster). It is often claimed that the US console outputs superior picture quality.

The cartridge slot was redesigned to be wider than both the European SNES and the Japanese Super Famicom, as the cartridges are larger and more angular.

The colour of the controller fire buttons was changed, from multi coloured to plain purple. The reset and power buttons were made much larger and also the same colour.

Super Famicom cartridges are compatible with the US machine, although in an attempt to regionalize the machine, two plastic prongs were built into the cartridge slot, to prevent Japanese cartridges from being physically inserted, though these were easily removed, making this a very desirable variant of the SNES, as it could then play all US and Japanese games, at full speed and full screen, with no need for an adapter.

 The US console was designed by Nintendo of America industrial designer Lance Barr, and is slightly larger than the Super Famicom, and European machines, which used identical cases, but different branding, it is generally regarded as far more ugly than the Super Famicom and European SNES, having none of the curved lines, or coloured buttons.

Another difference is the power connector, the US machine has a very different one to the other versions and is DC, rather than the European, which were AC.

 The console is even more vulnerable to turning yellow than the other regions, our machine is very yellow on the bottom half, but thankfully, the top half is still it's original grey colour, this was due to the plastic oxidizing with air.

This would be the last time that Nintendo released a machine that was in a different case for a certain region.

 This version of the SNES was also released in Canada, and certain parts of South America.

Has a third party PSU and two controllers.

Manufacturer: Nintendo
Date: 21st November 1990

This exhibit has a reference ID of CH39976. Please quote this reference ID in any communication with the Centre for Computing History.

 
Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) (US)

  Games Archive   [8]

Click on the Image(s) For Detail


User Submitted Articles


Add Your Article >>>

Help support the museum by buying from the museum shop

View all items

Founding Sponsors
redgate Google ARM Real VNC Microsoft Research
Heritage Lottery Funded
Heritage Lottery Fund
Accredited Museum